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Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1963"

Copyright © 1963, Kent State University 

ROBERT R. BLUMEL, EDITOR 
THOMAS A. SUCHAN, ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
JOHN R. KLOSS, BUSINESS MANAGER 
RICHARD P. GOODRICK, ADVISOR 



CHESTNUT 

BURR 





NINETEEN 

SIXTY 

THRPP 

CHESTNUT 

BURR 




NINETEEN 

SIXTY 

CHESTNUT 

BURR 




KENT STATE UNIVERSITY 

KENT, OHIO 
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 
June 1963 
To All Students, Alumni, Faculty and Staff: 

As I contemplate my nineteen years on this campus, I 
realize ho^v rewarding they have been, though sometimes 
strenuous. My greatest re\vards have come from -(vatching 
the thousands of students as they gro^v and develop in the 
environment of this campus, and go on to advanced study 
or to a vocation, distinguishing themselves and their alma 
mater. 

I cannot refrain from mentioning, too, the great satisfac- 
tions and pleasure I have had in being associated ^vith the 
scholars who are or have been on oiu- faculty. Growth has 
been continuous and rapid, demanding increase in staff in 
the fields of instruction, business and finance. The loyal 
and devoted persons in these areas have helped immeasur- 
ably ^vith the burdens of this office, and I shall always owe 
them a great debt. 

After so many re^varding years, I have mingled feelings 
about leaving, but time is catching up with me. We shall 
be living here, and oiu" affection for and interest in the 
University will never falter. 

^'— ^ Faithfully, 

* I George A. Bo^vman 
President 



6 






Dedication 



President Bowman has played such a signi- 
ficant role in the life of Kent State University 
for the past 19 years that his retirement will 
be difficult for many of us to accept. Under 
his guidance a pattern of gro\vth ^s•as devel- 
oped which has increased the enrollment, fa- 
cilities, acreage, faculty and academic repu- 
tation of the University. This multiple growth 
in Kent's stature has been achieved by Dr. 
Bo^vman's sincere dedication to Kent State 
University and the welfare of its students and 
faculty. For this reason, the staff of the 196? 
Chestnut Bury respectfully dedicates this 
book to Dr. George A. Bo^vman. 



Patterns of growth are many in form. In recognizing this, President Bow- 
man encouraged the upkeep and improvement of existing facilities along 
with building construction. Even the most insignificant piece of equipment 
or bit of remodeling needed during this, possibly the most dynamic, period 
of Kent State University \vas anticipated during the Bowman administra- 
tion. Worn classrooms ^vere modernized, insufficient lighting was replaced 
and the natural beauty of the University's ^vooded campus was improved. 
Trained specialists have been permanently added to the payroll to see 
that any and all refurbishing can be made without the slightest delay and 
least expense. The school no-w employs regular gardeners, carpenters, 
electricians, glass ^vorkers and other skilled staff. 



CARPENTER AND . . . 

Hammering our growth. 





. . . MAINTENANCE MAN 
jj "Improving existing facilities." 



ELECTRICIAN 

A chair of higher education. 



LANDSCAPERS 

Cementing the new frontiers. 




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NORTH HALL 

'Temporary" W.W. II structure still in use. 



A REMINDER 

Defeat in Columbus. 



Funds from the State's treasury could not keep pace with the growth of the 
University as shortages of student housing and classroom space threatened. 
Unable to impress legislators with the need for expansion in housing, Presi- 
dent Bowman and his staff turned to private loans and assistance from the 
Federal Housing Authority. Under his plan eight residence halls, valued at 
more than ten million dollars, were constructed without cost to Ohio's 
taxpayers. But the State Legislature was the only source for funds to build 
needed classrooms, and President Bowman made frequent trips to Columbus 
to speak before finance committees on the needs of the University. Although 
his words were sometimes ignored. President Bowman stubbornly continued 
to fight for better classroom facilities. 






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OHIO 

Fifth in total income; ■t2nd in percentage of 
support to higher education. 



ORATOR 

In Columbus he was always voluble. 









ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Opened in 1962. 



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n The newly constructed Arts and Sciences 
Building reflects the forward thinking of 
President Bowman. The academic center, a 
product of his legislative battles, is a 2.5 mil- 
lion dollar structure. Functional with such 
facilities as air conditioning and indirect 
lighting, the building features a strikingly 
bold appearance. The blue - paneled outer 
walls and all-glass entrance are duplicated 
nowhere else on campus. In addition to 
classrooms, the Arts and Sciences Building 
houses numerous seminar rooms for depart- 
mental use and two lecture halls, one with a 
seating capacity of 450. The ground floor, 
location of the Registrar's Office, is a hub of 
activity in the University. 







1 



RECTANGULAR TRANSPARENCIES 
"Through a glass darkly." 



The physical gTo^sth of the campus during the Bow- 
man administration is indeed impressive. More than 
fivo-thirds of all buildings have been turned from 
blueprint to reality under his guidance. Since 1944, 
when he assumed the presidency, the Health Center, 
three temporary classroom buildings and the Univer- 
sity ^varehouse have been constructed. Among mod- 
ern facilities for students are four residence halls for 
^vomen — Terrace, Verder, Dimbar and Prentice — 
and four for men— Johnson, Lake, Olson and Stopher. 
Quarters for married students will soon be com- 
pleted, and the first coed dormitories are taking 
shape. Other large-scale projects include Memorial 
Gymnasium, Memorial Stadium, Van Deusen Hall, 
a library addition and the Student Union Building. 
Latest of President Bowman's ventures are the Speech 
and Music Building and the Arts and Sciences Build- 
ing, monuments to his visiori for growth. 




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CO-ED DORMITORY 

Progressive symbol of growth. 



FAMILY LIVING 

New housing for married students. 









,ti.*ik; 1.500 CAPACITY 

, .JiiJp Built without taxpayers' aid. 



■ ;•« PATTERNS 

J, '11 j^V^yS "From blueprint to reality.' 



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VICTORY BELL 

A stolen gong— the silent tolling of our triumphs. 

STUDENT HOUSING 

Built to fulfill a demand 




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HEALTH CENTER 
Providing a major student service. 



No man ever left less to chance in guiding 
the physical growth of an institution than 
President Bowman. Each structure built dur- 
ing his tenure of office is both attractive and 
practical. From the victory bell on the Com- 
mons to the buildings that surround it, there 
is evidence of a deliberate "pattern of 
growth." Whether it be one section of the 
campus or the entire University, symmetry 
and harmony are evident. 




PAINTER 

Adding the final touch. 



ARCHITECT MORBITO 

A moment of examination. 




SKILLED ARTISAN 
The exactness of growth. 



THE FINISHED FUNCTIONAL PRODUCT 







. . . FROM PLANNING 
AND EFFORT . . . 



LEAVING THE NATURAL BEAUTY. 



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At the end of this decade it is estimated that there 
will be more than a 70 per cent increase in college 
enrollments. The President has helped to prepare 
the University's facilities for this increase. Addi- 
tional residence halls are now underway, and re- 
quests for additional classroom space are before 
the legislators. And, the Bowman administration 
had already obtained land for considerable future 
expansion. The total acreage of the campus in 
1944 was 105. Today it is 556 acres, plus a 200- 
acre airport. 



The physical gro^vth of the University stands 
as a monument to Dr. Bo^vman's planning 
ability. The impetus he has given the Uni- 
versity's campus expansion will be felt in 
succeeding generations. Dr. Bowman has es- 
tablished the pattern and procured valuable 




land that will make possible the continuation 
of the School's gro^vth. He not only has kept 
pace with a growing institution, but he has 
made it possible for others to continue build- 
ing an educational plant that can be among 
the finest in the State. 




THE MEANS OF GROWTH 




HAVE BEEN CONSTANTLY APPARENT . . . 

. . . FOR NINETEEN YEARS 



When Dr. Bowman took office, the presidency 
of the University was a "one-man job." As 
the University grew, the work of the presi- 
dent inci-eased. Not wishing to become the 
indispensable man or to hinder the operation 
of the School by holding too tightly to every 
duty. President Bowman surrounded himself 
with able assistants. As the ^vork continued, 
two of his assistants were elevated to vice 
presidents. Dr. Robert White was named 
Vice President of Academic Affairs in 1958, 
and John W. Bunn was designated Vice Pres- 
ident in Charge of Financial Affairs in 1962. 
This delegation of authority has been in no 
sense an abdication of responsibility for Dr. 
Bowman. The president with his staff has 
steadfastly guided the University's growth in 
cooperation with the Board of Trustees. 




Board of Trustees, l-r: Robert C. Dix, Frederick M. Broda, Ray P. Dinsmore, President Bowman, John R. Williams, presi- 
dent: John McSwecney, Robert H. Stopher, Otto J. Korb, vice president (deceased); Mrs. Alice Makinson, secretary. 




VICE PRESIDENT BUNN 
In charge of Business and Finance. 







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FINANCEMEN DUNN, BERG AND BAUER 

Comptroller, Treasurer, Business Manager 




VICE PRESIDENT WHITE 
A man of perception. 



MRS. MAKINSON 
Secretary to the President. 




R. G. ROTZEL 

Director of Admissions. 



FRED HEAD AND MRS. LINNARD 

Assistants to the Registrar. 





CAROLYN WILES AND DR. ATKINSON 

Registrar and his secretary. 



A basic, yet anticipated, disadvantage of a progTessive and 
conscientious administration is that thiough its work present 
facilities and procedures become inadequate. An expanding 
enrollment inevitably resulted in tight quarters for the reg- 
istration and admissions staffs. Because of the booming ntim- 
ber of students during Dr. Bowman's term of office, from 
900 in 1944 to 10,000 at present, the offices of Registrar 
Charles E. Atkinson and Director of Admissions Richard 
Rotzel outgrew their base of operations in the Atrium. Last 
year they relocated on the first floor of the ne^v Arts and 
Sciences Building to handle the thousands of letters from 
prospective students and class schedules they process an- 
nually. 



DR. BRAILEY AND STUDENT 
Director of Orientation. 





The measure of a University is not ho^v many 
buildings or how much land it has, nor is it 
the number of students Avho enroll. Rather, 
it is the quality of the student and the ca- 
pabilities of his instructor. Academic yard- 
sticks now restrict the admission of below-av- 
erage high school graduates. This improves 
the quality of the ra^v material and has re- 
duced the number of failures. To increase 
the caliber of instruction, the emphasis for 
the hiring and promotion of faculty members 
is placed on advanced degrees and practical 
experience in the field. The apex of Presi- 
dent Bo^vman's efforts to advance the academ- 
ic climate of the University was reached in 
1961 when a doctor of philosophy program 
was inaugurated. When a university has the 
resources to offer the Ph. D., it signifies that 
it has matured. Another mark of a univer- 
sity is a museum. Kent State University does 
not have one, but it does have a committee 
that was set up by President Bowman this 
year to study the practical need for a mu- 
seum. The establishment of this committee 
again shows President Bowman's awareness 
of the balanced growth pattern of a flourish- 
ing university. 



SYMBOLIC OF THE PH. D. 

Attainment of the highest academic honor. 



Museum Committee, clockwise from bottom.: Joseph Morbito, Sherman B. Barnes, Walter B. Barbe, Robert Morrow, John B. Nicholson Jr., 
William Taylor, Roy E. Wenger, Henry A. Christopher, Jordan A. Hodgkins. Members not pictured are Ralph Dexter and Glenn Frank. 





MILITARY DAY 

Dr. Bowman greets the officers during the Presidential Review. 





Dr. Bowman is a man with a strong sense of what is 
right and wrong. He is a fraternity man himself but 
does not permit the Greeks to become the focal 
point of the campus. He is an avid sports fan, but 
he will not permit athletics to supersede the value 
of an education or honest work. He knows the Uni- 
versity needs funds but is reluctant to raise the cost 
of attending classes because he believes a state-sup- 
ported school should be within the reach of every 
income group. 



DEAN NYGREEN AND PRESIDENT 

Campus Day chat. 




ROTARY 

Exchanging international views. 




THE BOWMANS AT HOME 
A chance to relax. 



27 



RECEPTION 

An impressive host. 






VICE PRESIDENT AND PRESIDENT 

A personal gesture. 




CLASS OF '17 TO '63 
Between handshakes. 




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HOST 

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President Bowman is not the personification 
of an omniscient machine. But what he has 
done in his capacity as president of Kent 
State University has increased the worth of 
the institution and the value of our diplomas. 
Dr. Bowman will walk out of our lives this 
June when he leaves the Office of the Uni- 
versity President, but he leaves with the 
knowledge that his ^vork has materially 
shaped the future of Kent State University. 
For this we are grateful. 





SENIORS 
Some concerned, some lethargic, all grndiinting. 



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From the beauty land Ohio comes a universal praise, 'tis the song o£ 




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Alma Mater that her sons and daughters raise. 'Tis a hail to Kent forever, on the Cuyahoga shore. Xow we join the 





loving thousands as they sing it o'er and o'er. Hail to thee our Alma Mater, oh how beautiful thou art. 



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Table of Contents 




36 




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Research 



Tapeworms, monkeys, molecules — all 
are part of research being done by 
faculty and graduate students. While 
Kent considers teaching its primary 
duty, original research work is com- 
ing into importance as the curricu- 
lum expands to include many gradu- 
ate degrees. It now offers these de- 
grees: M. Ed., M.B.A., M.S., M.F.A. 
and Ph. D. The awarding of the 
master of arts degree and the found- 
ing of a graduate school at Kent were 
authorized by the State Legislature. 
Kent gained University status in 1935. 
To encourage advanced study in busi- 
ness, education, the humanities, social 
studies and the sciences, the Univer- 
sity Research Committee was formed 
in 1958 under the leadership of Vice 
President Robert White. Among the 
group's first measures was the award 
of faculty research grants. With aid 
from. federal, state and private 
sources, faculty grants have totaled 
a half million dollars in the last five 
years. Through this financial aid, 
professors are able to bring the most 
recent discoveries to graduate stu- 
dents. The University believes that a 
strong graduate program can only be 
carried on if the instructors them- 
selves pursue original research. 



Believing that research and teaching are 
simultaneous functions of the faculty, 63 pro- 
fessors have organized 80 research projects in 
the last five years. However, faculty interest 
in University research dates to 1946 ^vhen 
faculty and community members formed the 
Kent Research Group. Though not officially 
connected \vith the University, the group 
encouraged individual investigation and 
scholarly ivriting. To further these aims, the 
University offered study giants. Financial 
support came in three forms: Alumni Fund 
Awards, Summer Faculty Research Employ- 
ment and Research Time Grants. The time 
grants permitted professors partial relief from 
teaching duties during the year to organize 
study projects. Especially active in the pro- 
gram were instructors in the biology, chem- 
istry, English, history, physics, psychology and 
special education departments Their inves- 
tigation varied from the study of marine food 
chains to critical analyses of literary ^vorks. 
Representative of Kent's biological investiga- 
tion are studies of electrolyte solutions made 
for the United States Air Force by Prof. 
Thomas Myers. Three physics projects in- 
volved proton study, while the psychology 
faculty made advances in the study of stim- 
ulus-reward theories. In the English depart- 
ment Prof. Glenn Burne wrote The English 
Nineties and French Literary Theory under 
the Summer Faculty Research Employment 
Fund. Communal societies of the American 
frontier was the research topic of Prof. Hal- 
lock Raup, geography department head. In 
addition to many studies of gifted children, 
the education department sponsored an inves- 
tigation of ^vhat high school students do in 
study halls. Included in numerous history 
projects was Prof. William Zornow's book 
Harry S. Truman: The Story of the Pres- 
idency. A campus project that made its world 
premiere at Kent was Prof. John White's 
opera based on Washington Irving's The 
Legend of Sleepy Hollow. The comic opera 
in three acts was presented by the music 
department in E. Turner Stump Theatre 
last spring. 




ROBERT OLSON 

Man's orientation in space. 



FRED NEUMAN 
Stimulus generalization and the pigeon. 




In laboratories and behind desks, Kent's _s;raduate students 
perform systematic, patient studies from original sources to 
discover facts and principles. Future psychologists, chem- 
ists, physicists and biologists are working toward M.A., M.S. 
and Ph. D. degrees in their major fields. In the psychology 
department's recently acquired primate laboratory, gradu- 
ate students are busy on new theories to add to the knowl- 
edge in this science of behavior. Of prime importance is 
their understanding of how patterns of behavior can be 
predicted by controlling environmental situations for both 
animals and human beings. 




Graduate student Fred Neuman is experimenting with pi- 
geons on stimulus generalization for his masters thesis. The 
ability of monkeys to solve complex problems is the topic 
of Jon Williams in his research with Profs. Robert Treich- 
ler and Robert Morin. Their work is the first neural-be- 
havioral study involving primates that has been done at 
Kent. Within the last decade psychological research of 
man's awareness of his physical balance has been concen- 
trated on a person's ability to orient himself in space. In 
connection with this, Robert Olson is working on the ef- 
fects of set and practice upon man's perception of verticality. 



DAVE MILITICH 

Chromosomes and internal anatomy. 



The molecule, one of the smallest bits of matter 
known to scientists, is one of the largest research 
topics of Kent's graduate students in chemistry. 
Synthesis of new and unusual molecules which 
contain a nitrogen atom in the ring structure 
is the research topic of George Newkome. New- 
kome must find the best way to make this type 
of molecule, study its physical and chemical 
properties and eventually learn what physiolog- 
ical effects it will have on the human organism. 
George Kletecka, a Kent graduate, is studying 
the ability of certain molecules to attach them- 
selves to or to complex themselves with other 
molecules which are able to induce cancers in 
laboratory animals and humans. 



GEORGE KLETECKA 
Attachment of synthetic molecules. 




In association with the chemistry department, 
the physics department offers major study in 
chemical physics leading to a Ph. D. degree. 
Presently David Koltenbah is constructing and 
testing apparatus which will be used in his doc- 
toral program to study the effect known as 
nuclear or pure quadrupole resonance. Study 
of this effect is important in determining mol- 
ecular 'and crystalline structures and is under 
increasing attention by chemical physicists. Ray- 
mond Wise is preparing a masters thesis in- 
volving a study of the motion of water mole- 
cules in various hydrated crystals. 




DAVID KOLTENBAH 

Nuclear or pure quadrupole resonance. 



CHEMISTRY GRADUATE 

Cancer induced by molecules. 




OSCILLOSCOPE 

Showing changes in a varying current. 



RAYMOND WISE 

New Mexico State University graduate. 




CONCERNED WITH CANCER 

Controlling the normal function of a cell. 



Cells, snails and salamanders provide theses topics for bi- 
ology graduate students. Michael Sipes is doing field work 
in a taxonomic survey of the salamanders of northeastern 
Ohio. Snail parasites concern Dave Militich who is working 
on a thesis about the type, number, and morphology of 
the chromosomes and the internal anatomy of parasitoid 
larvae. Militich's work may lead to the biological control 
of undesirable snails which transmit diseases to humans. 
Dick Klatt, a former Kent physiology major, is conducting 
research on the nematode pork\vorm. For his work, Klatt 
is using live human embryonic skeletal muscle tissue. He 
plans to collect the young larval stages of the porkworm 
from the blood of infected albino rats. In cooperation 
with Prof. Vincent Gallicchio, the extracts of certain hu- 
man parasitic worms will be tested against a strain of hu- 
man cancer cells to see if the extracts have any effect on 
the mitotic division of the cells. 




PRIM.ATES IN STUDY 

Squirrel monkeys. 




DICK KLATT 

Research on ncmntnde porkworm. 




PHYSIOLOGY MAJOR 

Blood of albino rats. 



WORKING ON MASTERS 

Handling the problem of Trichinosis. 




DAVE MILITICH 

In search of a control for host snails. 



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WEATHER 

from drizzling to sizzling 



Carnival-like atmosphere descends on the University with the arrival of Campus 
Day, Kent's oldest and most festive social event. Eye-pleasing floats, open 
houses, a relaxing Songfest, bands, a parade and the 1962 Campus Day queen 
contributed to the excitement of the festive day last May. The day's whirl 
began with the judging of 30 floats on the theme of Jules Verne's Around the 
World in Eighty Days. Hours of stretching chicken wire into symbolic fonns 
and arranging crepe paper flowers in story-telling patterns were washed out 
this year as a 15-minute rain drenched entries lined up on Midway Drive for 
judging. On the front campus, showers did not stop Delta Upsilon fraternity's 
"K" girl, Nancy Epstein, from the traditional painting of the cement K near 
the library. After members of Cardinal and Blue Key honoraries marched in 
processional, Joan Mikluschak was crowned 1962 Campus Day queen. From 
her throne on the front campus. Queen Joan and four attendants watched the 
annual Maypole Dance in her honor. 



REVIEWER 

Of last night's work 



Campus Day 




SQUARED GALLERY 

With balloons held high 




TRAIL BEARERS 
A lag in the proceedings. 



PERFORMANCES EMI 

The moment they've been wailing for. 



Time moved quickly for spectators at the 49th 
Campus Day. As weather changed from drizz- 
ling to sizzling, the patched and dried floats, 
KSU and high school bands and ROTC units 
moved down the streets of Kent. Curbs were 
jammed. Record crowds viewed the parade led 
by Grand Marshall Mona Fletcher, political 
science professor. When the caravan of cars, 
musicians and military ended. Mid - American 
Conference Relays began at Memorial Field. 
Queen Joan and her attendants, reigning over 
this event, presented medals and ribbons to re- 
lay winners. In the afternoon the Men's Glee 
Club and Merrymen performed in an outdoor 
band concert. 




ENVOYS 

Defining the location. 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Guest bands marched with the Flashes. 




FLASHERETTES 

Stepping in the lead. 







DELTA UPSILONS MASCOT 
Showing sensitivity to music. 




COMMUNICATIONS 

ng and showing the message 



DRILL 

"No, Mr. Jones, this ain't.' 




INDEPENDENT MENS FIRST 
Turning Main Street into the Nile 



FORSHADOWING 

The end's in sight. 



HANSOM 

Handsomely driven, carelessly pulled. 




PRESENTATION 

With many yet to come. 



,J 1 \ ADMIRERS 

. Directing their attention toward the Queen 



Crowds gathered on the front campus to hear 
the Campus Day Songfest selections of 29 or- 
ganizations. During Songfest Dave Renninger 
and Jean Salvador received Junior Man and 
Woman of the Year awards. In the evening 
Duke Ellington and his band played for a 
dance in Memorial Gymnasium, while Wills 
Gym was filled with the sounds of Peter Palm- 
er's orchestra. During intermission, contest win- 
ners were announced. Alpha Tau Omega fra- 
ternity, Delta Gamma sorority, Verder and 
Stopher halls all won first-place trophies for 
their floats. Songfest's top honors went to Sig- 
ma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Alpha Phi soror- 
ity. Kappa Phi and Kappa Kappa Psi honoraries. 





ATTENDING ROYALTY 

The moment of coronation. 



GRAND MARCH 

Paving the way to the throne 



THOUGHT 

"Iron bars do not a prison make.' 




INQUIRING 

A student's concentration 



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TAUTNESS 
, some being new experiences . 



May Day Relays 




DESPERATION 

. of the pushing . . . 



DISTRACTION 

is passing through . 



Handicapped by burlap sacks, students at the 
annual May Day Relays discovered that potato 
sack racing is not the easiest means of trans- 
portation. Losing usual collegiate poise and 
grace, contestants with ability and agility per- 
formed in many such events. The Eighth An- 
nual May Day Relays, co-sponsored by Gamma 
Phi Beta sorority and Sigma Phi Epsilon fra- 
ternity, were held on the Sig Ep front lawn. 




DETERMINATION 

. . . the taste. 




The relays started with a parade from, the 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house to the 
Sig Ep house on Summit Street. There, com- 
petitors with athletic prowess and physical stam- 
ina participated in the traditional games includ- 
ing the egg toss, balloon swat, coke chug, pie 
eating contest, balloon pass, wheelbarrow race 
and sack race. These games provide one of the 
few times independent organizations can com- 
pete directly against Greeks. Sigma Alpha Ep- 
silon and Phi Kappa Theta fraternities scored 
the same number of points to share the May 
Day Relay Trophy. 



Rowboat 
Regatta 



Cool weather and a damaged picnic 
grounds failed to daunt participants 
in the 23rd Annual Rowboat Regatta 
last spring. Featuring water games, 
dancing, trophies and food, the regatta 
began with an auto caravan from Ter- 
race Hall to Roundup Lake Park, near 
Aurora. Despite a wind storm which 
destroyed the park's main building 
three days before, contests for Greek 
and independent organizations went 
into full swing. Wet sports included 
paddleboat, surfboard, inner tube and 
rowboat races plus a barrel roll, canoe 
joust, sweat-shirt relay and tug of war. 
Capturing the greatest number of 
points in the fraternity division of the 
competition was Phi Kappa Theta. 
First-place trophies also went to Delta 
Gamma, in the sorority division, John- 
son Hall, for independent men, and 
Verder Hall, for independent women. 
According to tradition. Queen Karen 
Lawrinson and her court of four prin- 
cesses were thrown into the lake after 
her crowning. Royalty and contestants 
reported the water was fine despite the 
brisk air. 





SPECTATORS 

A captive audience. 




QUEEN KAREN LAWRINSON 

Royalty's winning smile. 




PHOTO (GRAPHED) FINISH 

But not "nose-to-nose." 



JOUSTING 
The "Knights of the Bath." 




TUG OF WAR 

Grasping a first place. 



Mothers Weekend 

And 

Penny Carnival 

Hula-hooping girls, live kewpie dolls and moms, 
moms, moms abounded at the annual Penny 
Carnival and Mothers Weekend held spring 
quarter. The three-day weekend, sponsored by 
Associated Women Students, gave mothers of 
Kent coeds a taste of the life of a college stu- 
dent, but there were no tests, term papers or 
classes for the 1,400 moms who attended. They 
were given tours of the Arts and Sciences Build- 
ing and Lake and Olson halls and were enter- 
tained by the Sharks Club. After hearing a 
panel discussion on "The Pressures of a College 
Coed," they took part in Penny Carnival. En- 
tertainment and games of chance keynoted the 
carnival night as fraternities, sororities and in- 
dependents vied for prizes in booth designs. 
First place' for originality went to Delta Zeta, 
social sorority. The winning booth featured 
sticks with numbers. The holder of the num- 
bered stick corresponding to the number drawn 
was awarded a piece of bakery. Delta Gamma 
won first place in the general sorority division. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon copped first for fraterni- 
ties and Verder Hall was the best of the inde- 
pendents. Cardinal and Blue Key honoraries 
sponsored the event. 




A CHANGE 

Daughters' "home" cooking. 




A TEMPTING PRIZE 

Ring the cutie doll. 



ATTEMPTING FOR A PRIZE 

A layman's whirl with a lei. 




AQUA CONTRAST 

Study in precision. 




CHERRY BLOSSOM 

A budding entrance. 



Sharks 
Show 



Oriental mood music, wisteria trees and silk costumes set the mood for the 
annual synchronized swimming show sponsored by the Sharks Club last April. 
Practice and precise teamwork went into the show entitled "Sakura Matsuri," 
Cherry Blossom Festival, held in Memorial Pool. The traditional program 
opened last year with a number featuring swimmers with multi-colored parasols 
and little hats. The show included the annual stunt diving, as well as num- 
bers by "geisha girls" and "Kabucki warriors." "Judo," an act entirely student 
planned, featured six men swimming together in oriental fashion. The climax 
of the show demonstrated swimmers' skills in a number called "Sayonara." 
The Sharks Club is the only coed swim club in the Association for Synchronized 
Swimming for College Women. 




DIRECTOR FREEMAN AND FRIENDS 

"An hour of pomp and show." 



NTFC 




"No time For Classes!" Literally, there was none 
during six weeks of rehearsal for the 1962 "No 
Time for Classes" production of Kisynet. Putting 
a new twist into the musical, 150 students under 
the guidance of David Freeman, NTFC direc- 
tor, took part in numerous nightly rehearsals 
last spring. Featuring a stage company of 45 
and a 32-piece orchestra, Kisinet had a unique 
scenery plan that eliminated elaborate sets. Four 
moveable staircases in front of a mosque com- 
prised the stage decor. Almost as entertaining 
as both the singing and dancing were members 
of the chorus, who in full view of the audience, 
re-arranged the stairs from one grouping to 
another to form the next scene. Plans for the 
entirely student-operated NTFC production be- 
gan in the fall with the director's selection of 
the show and continued through winter quarter 
with auditions. More than 3,000 students and 
community residents viewed the musical during 
its three performances in May. 



WAZIR AND THE MRS. 
A "B" flat that gassed the crowd. 



BORODIN BY BAYLESS 

. . and a few good lyrics, too. 




RICHARD WAGNER AND VOICE 

"Songs of sense and pertiyience." 



University Theatre 



A play for voices, Under Milk Wood, keynoted 
the offerings of University Tfieatre during its 
1962-63 season. Last spring's production of Dy- 
lan Thomas's lyric poem was a UT experiment 
in presenting a work not written for the stage. 
Under Milk Wood's rich verse met with popular 
approval with its series of delicate song and 
rhyme vignettes loosely interwoven by two nar- 
rators who never entered action on stage. The 
production featured 34 actors, some taking dou- 
ble roles to represent almost 60 characters. Real- 
izing the need for variety in stage presentations, 
UT offered audiences six major plays, 20 one 
acts and a Sunday theatre series of plays and 
lectures throughout the year. This past season 
Kent audiences saw Lysistrata, Julius Caesar, 
Rhinoceros, Darkness at Noon, The Match- 
maker, Little Foxes, and two operas. The Maid 
Mistress and The Medium. 



LYSISTRATA AND COMPANY 

Revive Aristophanes' anti-xvar comedy. 




ANCIENT GREEKS 

Perplexed by Lysistrata's antics. 




Sumraer Theatre 




SI AGE MANAGER 

"Are there any questions from the floor?" 



DIRECTOR AND EDITOR \VEBB 

"Our Town" from the iviyigs. 




UNCLE TOMS CABIN 
"Straw hat's" longest run 



MRS. WEBB AND MRS. GIBBS 

While summer audiences watched in shorts. 



June of 1962 saw Kent's first venture into summer stock: The 
Kent State University Summer Theatre. High point of six UT 
"straw hat" productions was Prof. Earle Curtis' presentation of 
Uncle Tom's Cabin. University players did "Uncle Tom" in 
authentic style of the 19th century touring companies who made 
the play a national favorite for many years. In addition, sum- 
mer audiences viewed Thornton Wilder's American classic, Our 
Town; O'Neill's gentle comedy. Ah Wilderness; Joseph Kesser- 
ling's farce, Arsenic and Old Lace; Shakespeare's timeless 
Twelfth Night; and Agatha Christie's chiller, TJie Mouse Trap. 





ADMINISTRATOR 

Duty calls, but the weather clialleng 



TO FACILITATE STUDIES 

At rest with Contemporary World Problems. 



Barbecues 



PICNIC'S POULTRY 

Indulee in 'em. 




"A chicken in every pot?" Not quite— but cer- 
tainly one was in the stomach of each of the 
4,000 persons who attended the University Food 
Service's outdoor barbecue, fall quarter. Held 
on the Commons, the cook-out featured three 
tons of chicken, 4,500 of the barnyard brood, 
basted with barbecue sauce over a 200-foot smok- 
ing grill. Also on the menu were salad, dessert 
and a beverage. Wandering minstrels, the KSU 
band, gymnasts and Flasherettes entertained the 
gathering. Cheerleaders taught cheers to fresh- 
men during a pep rally after the feast. Climax- 
ing the evening, a torch parade marched to Me- 
morial Stadium for the Shriners Day football 
game. The Food Service also staged a "surprise 
sandwich" picnic spring quarter for 4,300 meal 
ticket holders and an open pit chicken roast 
for summer schoolers and high school students 
at the annual summer Band Clinic. 




MISS FJELD AND LEPIDES 

Enjoy 'em. 





REGISTRATION 

Orietitalion is involved 



NECESSITIES 

. . and expensive. 





PERMIT FOR E\'ENTS 
It will never turn out this well. 



LEAF RAKE 

Lifting freshman spirits. 




FROSH MIXER 

'Getting to Know You.' 



Hoixiecoming 



Sunshine, victory and a case of mistaken iden- 
tity combined to make Homecoming 1962 a 
break from the traditional. For the first time 
in many homecomings, sun outpowered showers 
as the Golden Flashes won a 20 to 18 football 
victory over the Toledo Rockets on Memorial 
Field. During the game's half-time an unwary 
student demanded a field pass from the man 
who was to make the annual Homecoming ad- 
dress. This man was President Bowman, and 
for the first time in 18 years the administrator 
had to identify himself to walk on the field. 
With a Kent vs. Toledo display contest, queen 
and open houses, the 41st Homecoming took 
place in bright but foot-freezing weather. The 
day's activities started with display judging and 
pre-game crowning of Queen Nancy Rickert. 
After the grid win spectators attended residence 
hall, fraternity and sorority open houses and 
buffets. 



DELTA GAMMA'S LION 
King of beasts reigns as victor. 




DELTA TAU DELTA'S DISPLAY 

Animation needs manipulation. 



THETA CHI'S GRINDER 

Final steps to completion. 



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NANCY RICKERT AND ESCORT 

Saluted bv Scabbard and Blade. 




A COMPLETED PASS 

Forshadowing the victory. 



Kent graduates were invited to the Homecom- 
ing Alumni Luncheon and School of Journal- 
ism coffee hour in the Student Union. As the 
day drew to a close, the music of Marty Conn 
and Billy Lang filled the two gymnasiums for 
the Homecoming dance. During intermission 
the winning displays ranging from "Et T. U. 
Brute" to "Flashes Rock the Rockets" were an- 
nounced. First-place trophies went to Alpha 
Tau Omega fraternity, Delta Gamma sorority, 
Verder and Lake halls. 



Homecoraing 



i 

I 




STUDENT COUNCIL PRESIDENT CASEY 

Accepts the Stoplier Hall prize. 



ATTENDANT BESSICK 

The spotlight reflects a glow. 




ROYAL DIVIDEND 

Nicer than getting the Stopher trophy. 







THE GUESTS OF HONOR 

/( vjas Dad's Day, but not the Flashes'. 




LEGISLATORS DAY 

Senator Stocksdale and coltegne. 



ROSKENS AND ATKINSON 

Concentratins' through squinting eyes. 




MILITANT FAN 
One of the duties of ROTC Day. 



Football 
Specials 



Papas, parading Arabs, music makers 
and top brass brought color and spirit 
to the 1962 sports season in four football 
extravaganzas. Featuring parades and 
half - time entertainment, Dad's Day, 
Shriners Day, Band Day and ROTC Day 
joined the traditional ceremonies of 
Homecoming to brighten grid contests 
of the Golden Flashes. Members of Ak- 
ron's Tadmar Temple paraded with 
their potentate's jazz band, drum and 
bugle corps and 20 high school bands for 
the first annual Shriners game when 
Kent battled Xavier University in Sep- 
tember. Fifty per cent of advance ticket 
sale receipts went to Shrine hospitals 
for crippled children. The Ohio Uni- 
versity vs. Kent meet brought hundreds 
of students' fathers to the campus for 
Dad's Day. A campus tour, open houses, 
rally and Food Service spaghetti dinner 
highlighted this annual event. Wearing 
numbers corresponding to those on their 
sons' jerseys, dads of team members 
watched game action from the sidelines. 






PROMPIERS 

Not discouraged by lack of enthusias 



CONDUCTOR MASTERS 
Leading Ohio high school bands. 



Twelve hundred high school band members paraded down Main Street to 
Memorial Stadium for the Fifth Annual Band Day in October. The musicians 
formed a giant eagle on the field during half-time of the Kent vs. Marshall 
game. For ROTC Day in November, 600 members of Kent's combined military 
units were presented to President Bowman for review. Cadets formed a card 
cheering section on the 50-yard line for the Kent vs. Western Michigan contest, 
and 16 corps sponsors and the commander of Angel Flight received traditional 
rose bouquets from Dean of Women Margaret Forsythe at half time. 



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Band Day 





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ox ROAST 

Taking advantage of land not under construction. 



Five hundred singing, cheering, torch-bearing 
Greeks formed the "court" for coronation cere- 
monies that opened Greek Week last October. 
With crowns of laurel leaves, Toni Perkins and 
George Jenkins became the Greeks' "Venus" 
and "Apollo" to reign over a week of activities 
sponsored by Panhellenic and Interfraternity 
councils. The week's events included a Greek- 
Faculty Tea, many fraternity-sorority suppers 
for foreign students and a lecture, "Greek Uni- 
fication and Action," by Dr. Eldon Nonnomaker 
of Michigan State University. As part of their 
program of community and school service, 
Greeks raked leaves on the front campus, helped 
clean the Kent City Hall and serenaded resi- 
dence halls. For night-time activities. Wills 
tennis courts were decorated with fraternity and 
sorority banners for a street dance featuring 
music by the Caps. The Nomads V, a folk- 
singing group, also presented a two-hour evening 
concert. Climaxing the week's festivities was 
an All-Greek Ox Roast on the Commons. 



ROAST'S ENTERTAINMENT 

Two-thirds of the "Travelin' Men.' 




Pork Barrel 




EDITORS COMMENT 

Let's take the "prohibit" out of prohibition. 



Kent's personnel deans, dressed as military men, stole 
the show at Pork Barrel last February. Led by Di- 
rector of Orientation Lester Brailey, in a World War 
I general's uniform, the deans joined the student 
body in presenting Pork Barrel skits satirizing cam- 
pus life. Pvt. Ronald Roskens, Corp. Ronald Beer 
and Petty Officer Thomas Hansmeier, deans of men, 
were awarded citations for snooping, cowardice and 
conduct unbecoming an officer, respectively. It was 
the first time faculty performed in the annual va- 
riety show. Twenty five student groups, basing their 
presentations on "Words from the Dictionary," com- 
peted for Barrel trophies. 



Black light and a live goat, along with the usual ac- 
tors and chorus lines, helped them carry out the 
theme. Theta Chi fraternity, using the word "broth- 
erhood," took a first-place trophy for its skit about 
the United Nations. In independent competition, 
Moulton Hall won a first prize for its rendition of 
courtship through the ages, while a take-off on Mac- 
beth brought Lake Hall a first place. Top winner 
for sororities was Alpha Chi Omega. With the word 
"vigor," the sorority presented a history of American 
physical fitness programs. Keeping Pork Barrel 1963 
running smoothly were the Travelin' Men, campus 
folk singers, who emceed the show. 



Cultural Events 



Variety was the sum and substance of 
Kent's cultural events during the 1962-63 
year. From lectures to library exhibits, 
University committees sponsored a program 
of cultural benefit to the campus commu- 
nity. Highlighting the Concert - Lecture 
Series was Dame Judith Anderson's por- 
trayal of Medea and Lady Macbeth. The 
series brought many notables to Kent in- 
cluding the Orchestra San Pietro of Naples 
and James Wadsworth, former United 
States Ambassador to the United Nations. 
Many art exhibits by students, faculty and 
professionals graced Van Deusen Gallery. 
Outstanding art shows were American 
Prints Today, by 55 leading graphic art- 
ists, and murals by Orozco. 



Adding to the cultural variety was the new 
Arts and Sciences Faculty Lecture Series. 
Featured speaker in an English series was 
American poet Donald Hall. The School 
of Music sponsored recitals by students, 
Faculty String Quartet and guests through- 
out the year. Vincent Persichetti was guest 
conductor at the Fourth Annual Confer- 
ence on Music winter quarter. The stu- 
dent body contributed to culture through 
art work and writing published in the 
Kent Quarterly. In residence halls, com- 
mittees brought films, speakers, art shows 
and a leadership seminar to residents. 
Rockwell Library was the setting for dis- 
plays of rare books and first-edition vol- 
umes to complete the variety of cultural 
programs available to students this year. 




MODERN DANCE CONCERT 

'Variety was the sum and substance . . . 




Top Hop 



Top Hop, in keeping with its name, was the 
"top" social event of winter quarter. Featuring 
the coronation of Miss Kent State and the Duke 
of Kent, the dance was held in Wills Gymna- 
sium last January. "Top-hatted" gentlemen were 
the decorative background for 1,000 students 
who danced to the music of Frankie Reynold's 
band. During dance intermission Kathy Slagel 
and George Jenkins were crowned as Miss Kent 
State and the Duke of Kent. Both royalty had 
been elected by an all-campus vote the week of 
the event. Also at intermission Delta Upsilon 
fraternity presented its first "Outstanding Soror- 
ity Achievement Award" to Alpha Phi sorority 
for the 1961-62 school year. Top Hop was part 
of a weekend of Greek activities sponsored by 
Panhellenic and Interfraternity Councils. Other 
"top" events mcluded a luncheon where Howard 
Walker, vice president of academic affairs at 
Marshall College, spoke on "Communications 
Between Student Organizations and Faculty." 
The traditional Top Hop concert was dropped 
this year after three singing groups cancelled 
out. 




JENKINS AND MISS SLAGEL 
Upholding the tradition of the Top Hop dmice. 



MINGLING SUBJECTS 
Their dance and their moment. 



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CLINGING SNOW 
Cold of winter reflected in its beauty. 









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SURVIVOR 

Temperatures dropped to 27 below. 




WINTER'S EXC:i SE 
Warmth foutid among friends. 



TINSLED BRANCHES 

A complement to Joyce Kilmer. 



Since the infancy of Kent Normal School, athletics have 
played a vital part in the University's program. Early 
in Kent's history, the Silver Foxes, as the Flashes were 
originally known, were playing top-flight colleges in 
all sports. This extra-curricular program continued to 
grow until the University could boast of 12 varsity 
teams. Some eight years after Pres. George A. Bowman 
took office in 1944, Kent State joined its present league. 
The Mid- American Conference. Since the Golden 
Flashes have entered this league, only the wrestling 
team has been able to \valk off ^vith an undisputed 
championship. The matmen have been Kent's most 
successful team through the years. In the immediate 
past— the 1962-63 season— there ivas continued misfor- 
tune in basketball and football. Improvements were 
shown in track, cross country, rifle and golf, while the 
baseball team notched its third straight second-place 
finish in the MAC. In 1963, wrestling and field hockey 
had winning seasons. The tennis and swimming teams 
broke almost all existing records, finishing tops in the 
school's sports history. 



Sports 







PUNTER HAUNER 

Kent version of the Can-Can. 




"^. 



FOOTBALL MENTOR REES 

Seventeen years at the helm. 









Varsity Football Team, Front row, I-r: Tom Hauner, Dave Jones, George 
Milosevich, Dick Baumgartner, Pete Mikolajewski, Bill Lee, Jim Flynn, 
George Jenkins. Jim Eisman, Tom Kilker, Dick \\'olf, Jim Zucali, Bob 
Harrison, Mike Kennedy, Wally Krauss, Brian Jennings, Sara Gibson. 
Row 2: Dr. A. W. Burek, team physician; Frank Padula. Denny Kempf, 
Will Sutton, Ray Gori, Booker T. Collins, Tom Batta, Jerry Bals, Alex 
Zenko, Bob Thiele, Jim Phelan, Ed ditcher, Steve Reid, Jim Lee, Lynn 
Parachek, Bob Tarlosky, Prof. Carl Erickson, athletic director. Roiv 3: 
Ray Vens, John Bucey, Clyde Allen, .■\1 Rose, Dick Welsh, Chuck 



Hantl, Luke Lollini. Maurice Swonguer, Ron Sense, John Sayers, Ken 
Monnot. Dick Merschman, Marty Malatin, Willy Asbury, George 
Bilko, Frank Rogers, Cullen Bowen, Bernie Hovan. Row 4: Jim Whit- 
man, Tom Smith, Jim White, Jack Walas, sports i7iformation director; 
Chester Williams, graduate manager of athletics; Ira Rebella, graduate 
assistant trainer; Otho Davis, trainer; Frank Smouse, line coach; Trevor 
Rees, head coach; Paul Amodio, end coach; Bob McNea, backfield 
coach; Dick Bowling, Tom Herman, Jim LaCivita. 



Gridders Flnisli Under .500; Fifth in MAC 



Winning four games and dropping five made 1962 a dismal 
year for Kent State's football squad. Coach Trevor Rees 
suffered his second straight losing season. Rees' charges 
fell below the .500 mark for the first time in his 17-year 
career at KSU. Bright spot in the weak Kent offensive 
attack was the near-sensational running of fullback Dick 
Merschman. The senior, after two years of varsity play, 
became the league's top rusher and 12th rusher in the 
nation. End Tom Kilker completed his varsity career by 
leading the team in total points scored with 26. The 
team's leading tackier was George Jenkins. Dick Bowling 
captured awards for the top sophomore and the best de- 
fensive back of the season. Jim Zucali and Jim Phelan 
were named as the Flashes' top linemen. 



In the MAC football race the Flashes finished fifth, winning 
two of six league games. The season's opener for Kent was 
a successful venture, as the Flashes gained a 22-7 win over 
the Flyers at Dayton. In KSU's home opener, a 41-yard 
field goal spelled trouble as Xavier University squeezed by 
Kent in a 9-8 squeaker. Combat with Ohio U was next. The 
Bobcats shut-out the faltering Flashes, 21-0. Third defeat 
of the season came against Miami, 23-14. Following the 
Miami loss, Kent turned the score around, winning, 23-14, 
over last-place Marshall. Bowling Green, conference 
champ, was the next foe and won over KSU, 45-6. A Home- 
coming crowd cheered Kent on to its last victory of the 
season, 20-18, over the Toledo Rockets. Two losses ended 
the schedule as Louisville and Western Michigan won, 
29-8 and 19-6 respectively. 



BO^VEN AND LEE 

Ready to pounce. 







» 









TACKLER MEETS MERSCHMAN 

Kent blockers become spectators. 



CO-CAPTAIN JENKINS 

Breaking into print. 




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STRATEGIC PURSUIT 

Taking advantage of liis "blind side.' 



Mr)/ 



>•«-> A .i.^ '..ftWA 



FLASH LINEUP 

Everything in place. 



FLYNN TO WHITE 

Productive combiyiation of talents. 






MAC SPRINTERS 

Plea to teammates. 



MAC Sports Day 



Golf matches, tennis sets and track events joined the tra- 
ditional social activities of Campus Day in 1962. Sports 
activity was part of Mid-American Conference spring cham- 
pionships. In track eight records fell and three were tied 
as Western Michigan nosed Miami for the title. Standout 
of the track events was Scott Tyler, Miami speedster, who 
won the high hurdles. High scorer with I91/2 points, Tyler 
also ran second in the 220-yard dash and the 220-yard low 
hurdles. Second in scoring was Ohio U's Darnell Mitchell. 
The Bobcat cinderman set an MAC record in the mile run 
and a new league mark in the 880. Records were also 
smashed in the shot put, high jump, mile relay and the 
880-yard relay. In golf Marshall University smashed a 
long-standing Ohio U hold on the league links title. The 
Big Green, from Huntington, West Virginia, won the 
event with a 685 team score for 36 holes. Medalists for 
the tourney were Jim Ward and Pete Byer of Marshall 
with cards of 133 each. Low man for Kent was Denny 
Peterson with 144. As a team the Flashes finished seventh 
with 744. Pulling a near upset, Kent's tennis team came 
within a fraction of nailing the league tennis champion- 
ship. Western Michigan came out on top, capturing nine 
points, while runner-up Kent had eight. Kent dropped the 
last doubles set and that gave Western the edge. Larry 
Stark was Kent's only MAC individual champion. 




MARSHALL LINKSTER 
Tension before trial. 



BRONCO HIGH JUMPER 
Moment of determination. 




SPECTATOR ENJOYS LANDING 

Failing to conquer the height. 




WINNERS AND QUEENS 

Warm presentation of medals. 



OU DISCUS MAN 
// gritting teeth could do it. 





NORRIS AND DEFENDER 

In an attempt to cut the lead. 





Cagers in MAC Cellar 



Kent's Flashes fell to the MAC basketball cellar for the second straight 
year in 1963. The 1962 record of 2-19 was improved only to a 3-18 mark. 
Coach Bob Doll, in his second term as Flash mentor, can only look to 
the future. Doll has seen five Kent wins and 37 losses. But senior Denny 
Klug and junior Dan Norris kept the Flashes from total disaster. To- 
gether, the two players chalked up 57 per cent of the team's scoring. 
Kent's biggest problem was lack of rebounding. The Flashes pulled an 
average of 36.5 to the opponents' 46.5 rebounds per game. Win num- 
ber-one of the season came on the home court as Ball State fell, 61-58. 
Three weeks later Kent came up with an 83-72 victory over Baldwin 
Wallace. In its only conference win, Kent outlasted Marshall, 73-69. 
Highlight of the season was Kent's meet with Loyola University, then 
holder of the nation's best offensive record. Loyola had scored more 
than 100 points in eight of 15 wins before meeting Kent. The Flashes 
kept them under the 100 mark but suffered a 96-55 defeat. Two games 
—the first and the last— were lost by one and two points respectively. 
Syracuse nipped Kent 36-35, while Ohio U in a last-second win came 
out on top, 64-62, in the season's final. The Flashes longest losing 
period came early in the year when the cagers dropped their first six 
games. 




COACH AND CAPTAIN 

End of a brilliant college career. 




FLASH BENCH 

Call for help. 




CAGE CENTERS 

Kent and Miami are introduced to BG's Thurmond. 



AVID ROOTER 

Cheerleader Caryl Schissler. 





LONELY BALL 

Norris wants no part of it. 




COACH DOLL 

Another long night. 





REDSKIN SHOOTER 

Point 57 for Miami. 



KRAMER TO SANTOS 

Unexpected visitor. 




FLASH HUDDLE 

Words of "encouragement" from Klug. 




SAUNDERS AT THE LINE 

It was good, but not enough for the victory. 




HOT BALL 

Domjan to Norris. 



Falcons Top League 



The 1963 Mid-American Conference cage crown went to Bowling 
Green. The Falcons, winning nine contests and dropping three, 
made a remarkable recovery after losing three of their early 
league games. Toledo was Bowling Green's stiffest competition 
for the MAC championship. The Rockets lost out in the race 
in the last week of play. Ohio University, Toledo and Miami 
finished with identical 8-4 records. Western Michigan, after a 
strong start, fell to a 6-6 season's final. Kent State and Marshall 
were hopelessly lost in last place with 1-11 records as the two 
teams split their series. Individual league titles went to Nate 
Thurmond of Bowling Green, who won his third consecutive 
reboimd title and finished second in the league scoring race. 
Nipping Thurmond in the last game of the season. Many New- 
some came out on top in the scoring contest. The big news as 
far as Kent was concerned was the repeat performance of Denny 
Klug's winning the loop free-throw crown. Following a near 
miss in setting an MAC free throw record, Klug finished his 
varsity career by achieving a remarkable .870 percentage. Defeat- 
ing runner-up Newsome, Klug netted 74 of 85 charity tosses. 



LOU DOMJAN 

Giving Kent two points. 





KELLY FOR KENT 

As Marshall approaches. 



Mermen Dunk 8 Foes 



An impressive 8-4 swimming record topped Kent's winter 
sports season. Three of the four swim losses for coach 
Bill Hoover's team came at the hands of Mid-American 
Conference foes. Western Michigan, Miami and Bowl- 
ing Green handily defeated Kent. Win number one for 
the Flashes came over Grove City, 62-33. Two more 
successes pushed the Kent total to 3-0 as Carnegie Tech 
fell, 62-33, and Ohio University wilted, 58-37. The 
Ohio U win marked the first Kent victory since 1956 over 
the Bobcats. Following the Ohio meet, Western Michi- 
gan handed Kent its first loss, 59-36. Baldwin Wallace 
was Kent's next victim, 64-31. Miami dunked the Flash- 
es, 65-30. Wittenberg and Slippery Rock came out on 
the short end of 53-40 and 60-35 counts, while Bowling 
Green and Notre Dame upended the Flashes late in the 
season. Outstanding in the Flash attack was the sensa- 
tional diving of sophomore Ray Giacomone. The tanker, 
setting the new mark at 243, broke the school record on 
three different occasions. Giacomone won all but one 
individual diving contest during the season. 



Swimming Team, Front rotu, l-r: Bill Hoover. 
coach; Bob Babiak, Ray Giacomone, Joe Weber. 
Row 2: Jim Barnard, assistant coach; Greg Kan- 
nel, Don Hunston. Row 3: Jack Schiller, Jim 
Walls. Row 4: Don Abbott, Jim Green. Row 5: 
Grant Brown, Ron Turbaczewski. 







MERMEN 
Off with a bang. 




Begala's Matmen Keep Wiimlng 



Winter 1963 marked another winning season for 
wrestling coach Joe Begala and his Golden Flash 
matmen. Completing an 8-2 dual competition 
mark, the Kent grapplers lost only to Miami 
and Ohio State. Miami nipped Kent, 14-13, in 
the first loss, while the Buckeyes decisioned the 
Flashes, 20-8. Opening contest for the matmen 
was a sweep in the Memorial Gym quadrangular 
match between Kent, Western Michigan, Ball 
State and Bowling Green. Kent wound up tops 
in the event with 66 points. A big win during 
the regular season came over arch-rival Ohio 
University as the Flashes won, 22-8. Other Flash 
victims were Cincinnati, Marshall, Western 
Michigan, Ball State, Baldwin Wallace and 
Bowling Green. 



The season's victories pushed Begala's all-time 
Kent record to 241-45-3, giving him more wins 
than any other college wrestling coach. Since 
his first year here in 1929, Begala has produced 
29 team championships, 172 individual cham- 
pions and 26 MAC individual champs. In the 
all-important Mid-American Conference compe- 
tition in 1963, the Golden Flashes finished a 
disappointing fourth. Toledo won the crown 
with Miami and Ohio U coming ahead of Kent. 
Bill Pierson, Bob Shearer and Wayne Linke 
captured second-])lace finishes for the Flashes, 
but no one won an individual title for Kent. 
Gary Pesuit, expected to take the MAC crown 
in the 167-pound division, was injured late in 
the season and missed the league competition. 




^ .^- 



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Wrestling Team, Front row, l-r: Lynn Jackson, Jim Vataha, William Pierson, Ralph Fox, Gary Pesuit, Robert 
Scherer, Wayne Linke. Roiv 2: Rick Graven, Rick Vilem, Charles Walters, Mike Keenan, Rick Pierce, Don Na- 
der, Ron Schols, Robert Folatko. Row 3: Joe Begala, coach: Dave Farris, Ed Milanick, George Brulin, Robert 
Thiele, John Mead, William Weaver, Steve Sidik, Jim Dubno, Tim Flood. 





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"WORLDS WINNINGEST COACH" 

Begala observes wrestler's movements. 



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GRAPPLING FANS 
Enjoying a winning effort. 



MATMAN PESUIT 
Tired but watchful. 




Rlflers Hit 4-4 Record 



Kent's rifle team finished the 1963 season with an even 4-4 mark. 
Only Akron University was able to turn the trick twice on the 
Golden Flash marksmen. In the first Akron-Kent meeting, the 
Zips nipped the Flashes, 1372-1370. Akron led a second encounter, 
1374-1369. The other two Flash season losses were credited to 
Gannon, 1367-1366, and to Youngstown, 1388-1364. Finishing sec- 
ond in the Lake Erie Inter - Collegiate Rifle Conference, Kent 
chalked up its first win over John Carroll, 1337-1335. Gannon was 
the Flashes' next victim as the Erie, Pennsylvania, team fell, 1384- 
1340. The fifth match, against Youngstown, went Kent's way, 1386- 
1380. In the last match, Kent pulled the league's highest team 
total by gunning down John Carroll, 1405-1366. Leading shooter 
for the season was senior Jim Miller, who finished second in con- 
ference ratings. 



INSTRUCTION 
Point of focus. 




Rifle Team, l-r: Jim Miller, Ernie Kuhn, John Compana, Gene Ecerment, captain: Joe Dluzyn; Al deiger, Jerry Gosche. 



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Cross Country Team, l-r: James Kovach, Robert Harvey, Bruce Clark, Jack Tippens, Earl Pitzer, David Wise, Jim Rog. 



Harriers Iraprove 



Cross country fortunes continued to climb on the 
Kent scene as Coach Doug Raymond instilled new- 
found enthusiasm into the Flash harriers. First 1962 
win for the Kent cross country team was at the ex- 
pense of nearby Hiram College as Kent came out on 
top, 25-31. Second win of the young season for Kent 
was in a triangular meet with Ohio Wesleyan and 
Baldwin Wallace. The Flashes led the way with 33 
points, while Baldwin Wallace had 42 to Ohio Wes- 
leyan's 52. Slippery Rock State Teacher's College 
proved too much for Kent in the third match as the 
visitors romped over the Flashes, 19-42. Kent found 
the going rough in the next two triangular meets. 
Wisconsin, Ohio State and Kent battled on the Buck- 
eye campus with Wisconsin winning and Ohio State 
coming in second. Kent finished a distant third. 
Ohio University notched a triangular win with Pitts- 
burgh and Kent. The Bobcats wound up with 17 
points, while Pitt and Kent had 47 and 70 respective- 
ly. The Flashes placed fifth in the Mid-American 
Conference relays to close the season. 



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WOODLAND STROLL 

No chance to appreciate the scenery. 




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Baseball Team, Kneeling, l-r: James Moughton, manager: Don DiSan- 
za, Roger Cook. Ken LaVergne, Ron Lochar, Richard Tate, Arnold 
Edwards. James Thomas, Jerry Hudec. Row 2: Bernie Hovan, Gary 



Huber, Ken Zitz, Bob Loeffler, Tom Moir, Andy Aljansic, Gerald 
Nowak. Row 3: Richard Paskert. coach; Gary Legg, Bill VonGunten. 
Mike Mowchan, Dan Norris, Doug Kramer, Jack Thiel. 



Flash Diamondmeii Runners-Up Again 



Under a new head coach the Kent diamondmen 
battled gamely in 1962 but fell slightly below 
the .500 mark for the season. But in the Mid- 
American Conference race the baseball team 
picked up a well-earned second-place finish. Dick 
Paskert took the helm in 1962 after 13 years as 
assistant coach and guided his players to their 
third runner-up finish in the league. Paskert, 
a 1947 graduate of KSU, was an outstanding 
baseball and football player here. Paskert's 
Flashes fell short of the league title as they ab- 
sorbed four conference losses. Western Michigan 
won the MAC for the ninth time in the last 
14 years. 



Leading Kent diamond hitter was junior Ken 
Zitz. The right fielder broke into the starting 
lineup early in the year and went on to pace 
the Flash hitting attack. Mike Mowchan turned 
in a credible 5-2 record on the mound. He lost 
the last game of the season to Pittsburgh by a 
ninth inning home run. The final loss cost Kent 
a winning season as the team ended the year 
with a 9-10-1 record. Ken LaVergne, Roger 
Cook and Fred Loeffler completed three years of 
varsity play for the Flashes. LaVergne and 
Cook were infielders, while Loeffler was pitcher. 



PITT HOPEFUL 

"Now, don't roll foul.' 





KENT SLUGGER 

Riding with a low, inxide pitch. 




PORTRAIT OF POWER 

Ready to unleash. 











DUQUESNE RUNNER 

An unorthodox approach to first. 



CAUTIOUS EYE 

Studying the pitcher's delivery. 









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Varsity Tennis Team, Kneeling, l-r: Steve Adams, Larry Stark, Ray 
Vens, Dave Miller. Row 2: Karl Chesnutt, coach; Paul Walker, Bill 
Tenwick, Robert Hutchings. 



Netters Best Ever 



Sporting their best record in the school's history, the 
Golden Flash tennis team wound up with only one 
loss in 1 1 dual matches. Only Ohio University was 
able to turn the trick and defeat Kent's netters. Karl 
Chesnutt's tennis men also came within one point of 
winning the Mid-American Conference net title. A 
loss in the doubles put Kent in second place with 
Western Michigan gaining the top spot. Sophomore 
Larry Stark was Kent's first MAC champion. He had 
an unblemished record in dual and doubles compe- 
tition. Junior Ray V^ens was also undefeated in dual 
and doubles play during the season. Captaining the 
Flash net squad was Paul Walker who had just re- 
turned from the varsity basketball court. Biggest 
win of the tennis season came against arch-rival Wes- 
tern Michigan. The Flashes nipped the Broncos for 
the first Kent conquest of Western Michigan. The 
Broncos had a 29-game winning streak before falling 
to the Flashes. 



LARRY .STARK 
// tennis balls could ask for clemency. 




Golfers Rise 



Golf Team, Kneeling, l-r: Terry Lequyea, 
Jim Whitledge, Denny Peterson, Bill 
Alexander. Row 2: Jay Fischer, coach; 
Bruce Culpepper, Bernie Frye, Mike 
Joyce, Don Schmeltzer. 





Kent's golfers climbed out of the MAC basement in 
1962 and finished the year with a 4-9-1 record. Coach 
Jay Fischer's linksters polled 744 points for a sixth- 
place finish in the Mid-American Conference compe- 
tition played on Meadowview Golf Course. Marshall 
University won the event with 685 points. During 
the season Youngstown University challenged the 
Flashes to two matches with the Penguins winning 
one and tying the other. Twice the Flashes were al- 
most shut out. Ohio University defeated Kent 221/2 
— 11/2, and Marshall knocked the linksters I71/2— V2- 
Wins during the season came over Toledo, Baldwin 
Wallace, Pittsburgh and Miami. Competing in the 
All-Ohio Golf Tournament in Columbus, the Flashes 
finished 12th from a field of 20 Ohio college teams. 
Near the end of the season the frosh golf squad com- 
pleted an undefeated record by conquering the var- 
sity linksters, I6I/2— 11%- 



LINKSTER'S QUANDRY 
Difference between a birdie and a 





STAGGERED RELAY 

A moment of tension. 



KENT TRACKSTER 

Maybe blowing will Iielp. 



Varsity Track Team, Front row, l-r: James Rog, Ron Anders, Paul MacMillan, Jerry Warficld, Richard Kaliler, Spencer Zinner. Row 2: Alan 
Auble, James Kovach, Charles Carghill, Robert Har\ey. Ned Swanson, Jack Tippens, Richard Roys, Tod \\'enning. Gene Gant, Row 3: Ron Bos, 
assistant coach; Jack Hathaway, Louis Thomas, Lou Domjan, Ron Sense, Don Chappelear, Doug Raymond, coach. 




Cinderraexi Find 
Winning Formula 



Doug Raymond, in his second year as Flash track coach, 
continued to rebuild Kent's cinder hopes. During 1962 he 
led his charges to an outstanding 5-2 season record. Wins 
came over Bowling Green, Toledo, Slippery Rock and 
Baldwin Wallace. The Air Force Academy and Ohio Uni- 
versity bested the Flashes in two dual meets. At one point 
in the schedule the cindermen had won three straight meets 
to mark an unprecendented high in a KSU track winning 
streak. Completing a successfiU season in the low and high 
hurdles, Jerry Warfield paced the Flash attack. Coach 
Raymond re-introduced javelin throw competition last year 
after its long absence on the Kent slate of track contests. 



Women's Field Hockey Team, 
Front row, l-r: Joyce Wid- 
nor, Judy Showers, Joy Ra- 
dos. Row 2: Vivian Knapp, 
Pat Kime, Marie Boarman, 
Dee Asbury, Pat Yuill, Nancy 
Thomas. Row 3: Jo An Cas- 
sel. Iris Jackson, Susi Pratt, 
Fay Biles, coach; Susi Pratt, 
Sara Keller. 




Unbeaten Hockey 
Squad Tops List 



•OOOPSI" 

Adversary's approach. 



Women's field hockey team, holders of the school's 
best win - loss mark, notched another undefeated 
season during 1962. Only once in six years have 
the Golden Flash hockey players tasted defeat. The 
College of Wooster upended Kent in 1960 to mar 
an otherwise unblemished record. Three foes fell 
to the Kent coeds in 1962. First, the Ohio State 
University Buckeye squad was handed a 5-1 defeat. 
Next on the card was Bowling Green who fell 4-1. 
Wooster, the old nemesis, couldn't match shots 
with Kent as the Flashes came out on top, 4-1. A 
match with Eastern Michigan was postponed be- 
cause of wet grounds and was never re-scheduled. 
H.P.E. instructor. Fay Biles, coached KSU's most 
successfull team. 







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Royalty 



Adding grace and charm to the usual campus 
festivities are coeds who compete for the 
title of queen. Major queenships on campus 
include Homecoming, Rowboat Regatta, Mil- 
itary Ball, Top Hop and Campus Day. Title 
winners, chosen in student elections, reign 
over campus activities during these respective 
events. Their "queen-for-a-day" role includes 
contributing their prettiness to the success of 
the social functions. The queens add that 
"extra something" which transforms the usu- 
al University events to special occasions. 



Miss Kent State 





Top moment of the Top Hop Dance was the crown- 
ing of Kathy Slagel as Miss Kent State. The senior 
sociology major was chosen as Kent's "Miss" in a 
general campus election. A native of Ironton, Miss 
Slagel has been a student staff counselor and the sec- 
retary of Prentice Hall. Angel Flight and Student 
Council are also among her activities. She is past 
president of Gamma Phi Beta social sorority and 
treasurer of Panhellenic Council. She represented her 
sorority at its national convention in New Jersey last 
summer and is active in the Gamma Phi Beta project 
of entertaining children from psychiatric hospitals. 
A member of Alpha Kappa Delta, national sociology 
honorary, Miss Slagel is planning to become a uni- 
versity residence counselor. 



Duke of Kent 




A native of Cadiz, George Jenkins was chosen to 
reign over Top Hop as Duke of Kent. One of the 
tri-captains of the varsity football team, Jenkins has 
been vice president of Varsity K. Besides earning two 
football letters at Kent, the pre-law student has 
served as president of Alpha Tau Omega social fra- 
ternity and Blue Key honorary. As director of his 
fraternity's scholarship committee, he has published 
a booklet, On Becoming A Scholar, given to Kent's 
incoming freshmen. A member of Pi Gamma Nu, 
national social science honorary, and Pi Sigma Alpha,, 
national political science honorary, Jenkins was 
named to an edition of Who's Who in American Col- 
leges and Universities. 




Rowboat Regatta 



A crown o£ flowers designated Karen Law- 
rinson as the 1962 Rowboat Regatta 
Queen. With her court of four attendants, 
Miss Lawrinson reigned over the annual 
spring event held at Roundup Lake Park 
last May. As part of her royal duties Queen 
Karen had the traditional honor of being 
thrown into the icy lake after her corona- 
tion. The 19-year-old sophomore from To- 
ledo was elected to her throne by an all- 
campus vote. She has been active at Kent 
State as a freshman cheerleader and is a 
resident of Prentice Hall. Majoring in 
two-year office administration in the Col- 
lege of Business Administration, she is 
planning to return to her home town to 
work as a secretary after she completes her 
course of studies at Kent. 




Homecoming 



As their hostess to welcome returning 
alumni, the student body selected Nancy 
Rickert for their 1962 Homecoming 
Queen. The junior from Souderton, 
Pennsylvania, has been active on campus 
as a member o£ the Prentice Hall chorus 
and the Spanish and English clubs. 



For Delta Zeta social sorority she has 
served as rush chairman, rush counselor, 
representative to Panhellenic Council 
and a member of the Panhellenic chorus. 
The 20-year-old coed is majoring in 
Spanish and minoring in English. After 
graduating from Kent, she plans to 
teach. 



Carapus Day 



As a queen with two royal titles, |oan Miklu- 
schak is a distinctive member o£ Kent's royal 
circle. Miss Mikluschak, a 1962 Kent State grad- 
uate, reigned as combination Campus Day 
Queen and Queen of the Mid-American Confer- 
ence Spring Sports Meet last May 19. While 
attending the University, Miss Mikluschak ma- 
jored in mathematics in the College of Educa- 
tion. She was a member of the Kent State Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Pi Mu Epsilon, mathematics 
honorary, and the Newman Club. Currently 
she is teaching in the Parma School System. In 
addition to presiding over the 49th Campus 
Day, Queen Joan's duties as a two-fold monarch 
included presenting trophies and medals to the 
victors of the MAC relays. She was guest of 
honor at the annual Campus Day luncheon and 
was feted in a special serenade at the dance that 
evening. The queen was elected by the student 
body from a field of five finalists. 



126 




With two trophies, a sparkling tiara and dozens of red 
roses, Holly Wilbert reigned as queen of the 16th An- 
nual Military Ball. Chosen by ROTC cadets, Miss Wil- 
bert was honored with a saber arch at the dance held 
in Myers Lake Ballroom last November. The 20-year- 
old junior from McMurray, Pennsylvania, has served as 
Liaison Officer First Lieutenant of Angel Flight and as 
an Air Force ROTC sponsor. She was co-chairman of 
the Army-Air Force Day sports meet. A member of Delta 
Gamma social sorority. Queen Holly has been active as 
assistant rush chairman, social chairman, representative 
to Panhellenic Council and pledge class historian. Ma- 
joring in art education, she is planning to teach after 
graduating from Kent. Miss Wilbert had been one of 
four attendants to the Homecoming Queen. 



Military Ball 







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A^caderaic 

and 
Personnel 



I 



The personnel, academic and administrative staffs, always vital to the 
smooth operation of the University, grow as the campus makes increased 
demands. The personnel staff, once housed in the two small offices of the 
deans of men and ^vomen, has expanded during President Bowman's ad- 
ministration to 40 members requiring the entire first floor of Kent Hall. 
From residence counselor to policeman, from academic dean to main- 
tenance man, the aims of the staffs center around the desire to serve the 
campus and to maintain the learning process. 





Dean Nygreen and Mrs. Helen Mai tinkns 



Dean of Students 



Regulating the non-academic concerns of the ex- 
panding student population are three personnel 
deans. Margaret Forsythe, dean of women; Ronald 
Roskens, dean of men, and Glen Nygreen, dean of 
students, are directly responsible to the University 
President for policies concerning more than 9,000 
students. 

With the aid of three assistant deans, Margaret 
Forsythe supervises women's residence counselors, 
Associated Women Students and Panhellenic Coun- 
cil. A district director of Alpha Lambda Delta, 
freshman women's honorary. Dean Forsythe has a 
master's degree from Syracuse University. 

From the office of Ronald Roskens come poli- 
cies governing men students. Besides counseling 
men. Dean Roskens, with his assistants, guides off- 
campus housing. Men's Student Association and 
Interfraternity Council. The Dean came to Kent 
in 1959 after completing his doctoral work at Iowa 
State University. 

Dean of Students Glen Nygreen coordinates cam- 
pus organizations and the functions of the Health 
Center. After receiving his doctor's degree from 
the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1954, he 
became director of student affairs at KSU. Dean 
Nygreen supervises veteran's affairs and the han- 
dling of student mail. 



130 



Deans of Woraen 




Deans of Men 




Deans Hansmeier, Roskens, Anthony and Beer. 



.-^v 



College of Fine and Professional Arts, Seated l-r: Leroy Cowperthwaite, Marjorie Kaiser, Dean John Kamerick, Elbert Tischendorf. Standing: 
Elmer Novotny, Joseph Morbito, Frank Stillings, William Taylor. 



Academic Deans 

and 

Department Heads 



From pre-forestry to aviation technology, the 
University's four undergraduate colleges of- 
fer courses of study to fulfill the extensive 
interests and goals of all who come to Kent 
to learn. Under direction of the academic 
deans and department heads, the four colleges 
attempt to meet the needs of students desiring 
liberal or specialized education. 

Twelve departments in the College of Bus- 
iness Administration, led by Dean Robert E. 
Hill, offer programs leading to a bachelor of 
science degree in business administration. 
Majors in accounting, management and eco- 
nomics are among the many available along 
with a two-year office administration program. 



College of Education, Seated, l-r: Guy A. Marco, Olive Woodruff, Dean Clayton M. Schindler, Walter B. Barbe, Burton Gorman. Standing: 
Carl E. Erickson, J. Keith Varney, Roy W. Caughran, Michael Herchek, Archie Hendricks. 




College of Business Administration, At desk: Dean Robert E. Hill. 
Hudson, Charles Soltis, Donald F. Mulvihill, John T. Doutt. 



l-r: Elizabeth M. Lewis, Harold Martin, Donald E. Anthony, Hersel \V. 



Founded in 1959, the newest college, Fine and 
Professional Arts, is under the direction o£ Dean 
John J. Kamerick. Continually expanding its cur- 
riculum, the young academic branch offers a B.A. 
degree in seven fields, a U.S. degree in six fields 
and a bachelor of fine arts degree in seven major 
areas in art and theatre. Added to the college's 
offerings this year is a bachelor of music degree. 
Architecture students in Fine and Professional 
Arts are on a five-year program. 

Dean Eric N. Rackham heads the College of 
Arts and Sciences which offers 25 major areas lead- 
ing to a bachelor of arts degree, 16 fields for a 
B.S. degree and many special programs. Courses 
of study include geography in government service. 



pre-theology and pre-natural resources. Arts and 
Sciences correlates pre - professional programs in 
medical technology, physical therapy, pre-dentist- 
ry, pre-engineering, pre-forestry, pre-law, pre-med- 
icine, pre-osteopathy and pre-phannacy. 

Guiding the largest and oldest academic branch, 
the College of Education, is Dean Clayton M. 
Schindler. The college offers four-year training in 
early childhood, elementary and secondaiy fields 
leading to a bachelor of science in education de- 
gree. Programs to prepare teachers for instructing 
deaf, gifted and slow learners are offered also. Ed- 
ucation courses lead to cadet certification and dual 
certification in grade school-high school instruction. 



College of Arts and Sciences, l-r: Robert F. Sitler, Henry N. Whitney, Maurice Baum, G. Kern Schoepfle, Hallock F. Raup, Col. Manley 
Morrison, Dean Eric N. Rackham, Col. Alvin Shultz, Philip R. Shriver, Harold A. Van Dorn, James T. Laing, Kenneth Pringle, Glenn H. 
Brown, Joseph H. Grosslight, Adolph E. Schroeder, L. Earl Bush. 



^ 



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University 
Security 



PEACH AND SWARTZMILLER 

Keeping the campus secure. 





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KSU's own private detective is Donald L. 
Schwartzmiller, campus security officer. 
With his assistant LeRoy Peach, Schwartz- 
miller coordinates operations of the police 
department and personally investigates all 
matters, from parking violations to thefts, 
on campus. Schwartzmiller, a graduate of 
the Ohio State Patrol Academy, came to 
Kent in 1960. Before heading the KSU se- 
curity service, he was with the Ohio State 
Patrol, Plain Clothes Division, as an inves- 
tigator. 



Day Shift, l-r: Patrolman Wade Conner, Chief Earl Coleman, Policewoman Sadie 
Reichel. 




Evening Shift, l-r: Patrolmen Jack Crawford, Gerald Peterman, Clifford Calvin, Dale 
Miller, Martin Tinker. Seated: Sergeant Clem Rine. 




Gatekeepers of the campus are the Univer- 
sity Police. Each night officers lock all 
classroom and administrative buildings in 
addition to patrolling women's halls and 
working the after-hours switchboard. Fif- 
teen blue-uniformed patrolmen and one 
policewoman are responsible for the safety 
of University funds, for issuing traffic vio- 
lations and for automobile registration. 
The force also investigates complaints, ac- 
cidents and reports of crimes. 



Night Shift, l-r: Patrolmen Bud Baer, 
Rudy Karst, Frank DeCenso. 



CARPENTER 

Concerned with the large and small 





CONTROL PANEL AND HELPER 

Keeping the campus warm and lighted. 



STIMULATION 

With one lump. 









Physical Plant 



Frozen water pipes, clogged chimney flues, warm air 
conditioners— these maintenance problems are referred 
to the employees of Kent's physical plant. The plant's 
staff of 70 is responsible for the upkeep of all campus 
buildings, and included in its duties are repairs of elec- 
tric, mechanical and heating facilities. Under the direc- 
tion of W. W. Harris, the employees include carpenters, 
truck drivers and plumbers. Besides running the cam- 
pus warehouses and transporting supplies, the physical 
plant's staff is responsible for heating the dormitories 
and academic buildings. On a snowy day the Univer- 
sity's furnaces consume as much as 90 tons of coal. 
Through the plant's office go all orders for devices to 
improve the outward aspect of the University, so assist- 
ing in the physical growth of Kent. 



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Oreranizations 



With an awareness that education is not limited to 
studies, the student body takes an increasingly ac- 
tive part in creating a rich extra-curricular atmos- 
phere. Making full use of campus organizations, 
students give generously of their time and effort. 
The pulse of such activity has quickened as the 
number of organizations has grown from 51 in 
1944, when President Bowman was new on the 
campus, to 140 at present. From athletic clubs to 
Greek-letter honoraries, these interest groups and 
professional societies serve to expand the learning 
process. Aware of this potential, the wise student 
participates in campus activities that can make the 
University an experience in personal growth, as 
well as in learning. 



J" ,- - - 













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* ■ •* 



governing 



Student Council 



A gavel raps as the secretary reads, "The meet- 
ing was called to order at 4:10 p.m. in Studio 
A of the SAC." So begins another weekly meet- 
ing of Student Council. The 45 members of 
the governing agency act as the student voice 
to the Administration while aiming at better 
student-Administration relations. Members are 
chosen in a general campus election according 
to their class standing. They must pass a test 
on parliamentary procedure before taking office. 
Representatives from Panhellenic Council, In- 
terfraternity Council, Men's Student Associa- 
tion, Associated Women Students and the resi- 
dence halls have a voice at meetings. Student 
Council selects members to serve on various ad- 
ministrative committees on campus. 



Student Council, Fro7Jt row, I-r: Elmira Kendricks, Marilyn Gilida, 
Susie Carter, Susan Gennett, Nancy Yentch, Rick Perkins, Marlene 
Yourga, Denny Peterson, Corinne Roberts. Kay McGowan, Judy 
Bond. Row 2: Maria Urso, Barbara Lawson, Kathy Slagel, Betty 
Jo Wollam, Sandy Babinchak, Mary Muesegaes, Kathleen Down- 



w 



ft 



ing, Carol Edmunds, Carol Mansfield, Joyce Ingham. Row 3: Joe 
Stark, Nancy Roberts, Thortias Lewis, Elizabeth Born, Bob Bates, 
Jim Walker, Bob McCullagh, Ralph Oates, Bill Moorhead, Craig 
Stephens. Row 4: John Minor, Joe Dornbush, Bob Casey, John 
Lee, Ken Welsh, Jerry Harris, Bob Lobel, Kelly Ramey, Tom Nero. 




Officers: Joyce Ingham, corresponding secre- 
tary; Ken Welsch, vice president; Bob Casey, 
president; Joe Stark, treasurer; Elmira Ken- 
dricks, secretary; John Lee, parliamentarian. 





CHEERING SECTION 

Cards try to fan school spirit. 



governing 




SOCIAL COMMITTEE MEMBER AND JUDGE 

They look for movement. 




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HEIR TO THE THRONE 

Take it from the top, or his son. 



Social Committee, Front row, l-r: Reed Harvey, Lee Fiedler. Row 2: Carole Kaliden, Patricia 
Burgess, corresponding secretary; Karn Stein. Row $: Karen Reagan, Cheryl Petraitis, 
recording secretary. Standing: Jack Fristoe, vice chairman; Bill Wendell, chairman. 



Social Comraittee 



In 1970, what will you remember most about Kent State? 
Some might picture a favorite professor; others might re- 
call the residence hall food. But most will think back 
with relish to those Homecomings and Campus Days 
which made the institution more than a place of learning. 
The smooth functioning of these memorable events is the 
responsibility of Social Committee. The committee at- 
tends to the many details connected with planning social 
events and enforces the University's Social Code. The 
committee of eight undergraduates and five faculty mem- 
bers oversees the judging of queens, floats and displays and 
the awarding of trophies. It is its job to select bands for 
the dances and to sponsor University concerts. Regulations 
for off-campus student functions come from Social Com- 
mittee as administrator of the Social Code. Individuals are 
appointed to the group by Student Council, Interfraternity 
Council, Paohellenic Council, Associated Women Students 
and the Men's Student Association. There are also two 
members at large and a chairman. 




SAB, Front row, l-r: Beth Anne Anient, cultural committee; Lillian 
Reed, service committee: Stanley Arner, treasurer. Row 2: Melody 
Wordsworth, dance committee; Karen Nelson, secretary; Ned Swan- 
son, publicity committee. Roxo 3: John Drullard, motion picture 



committee; Nancy Montgomery, special events committee; Gary Ganim, 
small games committee; Betty Jo Wollam, miscellaneous. Roiv 4: Bob 
Rubins, exliibit committee; Tom Romanin, chairman. 



Eddie Duchin, John Brown and Mr. MaGoo have all 
visited the campus by invitation from the Student Ac- 
tivities Board. Presenting such film personalities through 
the Weekend Flicks is one way SAB strives to provide 
activities to relieve Kent from the weekend status of a 
"suitcase school." SAB's 12 board members plan a com- 
prehensive social program including both classic and 
popular movies, bridge lessons, exhibits and lectures. 
TGIF dances are given weekly in the SAC. SAB was 
started as a temporary committee of Student Council in 
1962 and became a presidential committee of the coun- 
cil last fall. SAB operates through student fees. 



SAB 



••"r^"^ 



PREXY 
Reviewing SAB report. 




MEMORIAL DAY A LA "MODERNS 
A high note in the program. 



governing 




Officers, I-r: Linda Hedden, president; Joan Bessick, recording secretary; Jean Salva- 
dor, vice president; Janet Kadowaki, corresponding secretary; Judy Michael, treasurer. 




MOTHERS WEEKEND 

Coeds: some again; some for the first time. 



AWS TEA 

The bitter with the sweet. 



AWS 



Mothers of University women go coed each spring when 
the Associated Women Students holds its annual Moth- 
ers Weekend. AWS is responsible for seeing that the 
"girls" are chaperoned by their daughters to teas, lec- 
tures and the Penny Carnival. All women students are 
members of AWS, a medium by which the physical, 
mental and spiritual tenets of the University are pro- 
moted. AWS maintains high standards for women and 
through its annual Senior Women's Banquet and the 
Presidents' Banquet, co-sponsored with MSA, recogni- 
tion is given to campus leaders. AWS plans the New 
Faculty Tea and the Rebellion Ball and, with MSA, 
plans Pork Barrel. The organization sent 45 delegates 
to the Intercollegiate AWS State Day last year at Deni- 
son University. 




Hi 



^^ ' ^ 




AWS Executive Board, Front row, l-r: Pat Murphy, Neva Kitzmiller, 
Miff Yocum, Dee Albertson, Libby Marino. Row 2: Geri Clement, 
Karen Stein, Marilyn Gilida, Student Council representative; Jean 
Sitler, Presidents' Council chairman. Row $: Karen Jones, Marianne 



Horvath, Judy Michael, Janet Kadowaki, Sandy Hanna, Charlene 
Smith, Nancy Town. Row 4: Jean Salvador, Linda Hedden, Joan 
Bessick. 




Activities Board, Front row, l-r: Joan Rice, Marlene Heppert, Judy 
Mandusky, Pat Petrovic. Row 2: Pat McDonald, Noreen Gallatin, 
Marybeth Miller, Barbara Libby. Row 3: Georgia Prufusek, DeRonda 



Hogue, Julie Birch, Martha Elliott, Janet Duda. Row 4: Carolyn 
Morrow, Pat Murphy. 



145 



s:overniiig 




Officers, clockwise from top: Randy Thomas, corresponding secretary; 
Robert Deniston. vice president; James Vargo, president; James Angle, 
treasurer; Jack Blair, recording secretary. 



9 (^ y 




MSA, Front row, l-r: Art McBey, IFC representative; Jim Vargo, Reed 
Harvey, John Curtin, Don Schecter, James Kaserman, Randy Thomas. 



Row 2: James Angle, Jack Blair, Daniel Guest, Mike Joyce, William 
Kvet, Bill Deames, Ralph Oates, Thomas W. Hansmeier, advisor. 




PORK BARREL CO-SPONSORS 

Judges' confidence is our puzzlement. 




MR. MSA AND MISS OHIO 
Lynda Beck visits campus. 




MSA 



One of the "big three" governing agencies on campus, 
with Student Council and Associated Women Students, 
is the Men's Student Association. Traditionally MSA 
is responsible for Freshman Preview, Dad's Day, Pork 
Barrel, Presidents' Banquet and Senior Men's Banquet. 
In sponsoring these events, the organization's purpose 
is to promote student leadership and service while unit- 
ing men in social activities. MSA's 26-member executive 
board is the governing body for all University men. 
Elected and appointed officers form this board along 
with the vice presidents of Inter-Hall Council, Interfra- 
ternity Council and Men's Off-Campus Residents Asso- 
ciation and representatives from halls, fraternities, class- 
es and off-campus housing. Recently MSA organized a 
judicial board which hears appeals from decisions of 
student judiciaries. 




CHAIRMAN'S GUEST 
Emcees contribute to "Barrel" success. 



CONFERENCE 

Planning, essential for enjoyable events. 



IFC 



Officers, l-r: C. Nothhaft, chaplain; W. 
Oliver, press secretary; J. Jaccaud, 
executive vice president; J. Rucker, 
corresponding secretary; L. Ginnegaw, 
recording secretary; J. Fristoe, admin- 
istrative vice president: D. Renninger, 
president; K. Ramey, Student Council 
representative. 




Committee Chairmen, Front row, l-r: Bill Phillips. Gary Burnett. Bill Pirtle, 
Kelly Ramey. Row 2: Larry DelBane. Bill Wendell. Tom Wilkins. Row 5; 
James Jaccaud, Jack Fristoe. 




Initially established to assist the 18 social fraternities 
on the KSU campus in their rushing programs. Inter- 
fraternity Council, better known as IFC, has now grown 
to a position where its activities entail all facets of male 
Greek life. Annually the group sponsors Greek Week, 
Top Hop Weekend and Greek-faculty teas. IFC strives 
to promote the social, cultural and intellectual inter- 
ests of the Greek system while acting as the governmen- 
tal body of the social fraternities. Through IFC the 
fraternities on campus act as a collective unit, joining 
together to sponsor various community and university 
projects throughout the year. Interfraternity Council 
also attempts the maintenance of an academic atmos- 
phere among the fraternities by the presentation of an 
annual Scholarship Trophy which is awarded to the 
chapter having the highest scholastic standing. New 
this year has been the formation of a Presidents' Coun- 
cil, composed of chapter leaders, which investigates the 
occurrence of stagnancy within the fraternal system and 
presents suggested remedies to IFC. 



IFC, Front row, l-r: Donald Moore, Ronald Swartz, Mike Moorman, 
Sam Zickel, Gary Burnett, Dave Renninger, Jack Fristoe, William 
Hawkins, Jr.. James Rucker. James Jaccaud. Row 2: Larry DelBane, 
Tom Wilkins. John Shalaty, Bob Barres, Ron Emch, Walt Palechka, 
Bill Phillips, Ken McArtor, Neil Cohen, Carl Nothhaft. Row 3: John 



9 ^ 



Hook, Larry Ginnegaw, Ron Isele, Irwin Shulman, George Jenkins, 
Bill Pirtle, Roy Wilson, Paul Laemmle, Mike Cummings, Harold 
Stubbs. Row 4: Daniel Kenney, Kelly Ramey, Tom Nighswander, Jack 
Moran, Robert Denniston, William Oliver, Alfred Head, Bill Wendell, 
Mike Kohn. 



f. 






Panlielleiiic 



What's the rush? As the coordinator of rushing, 
pledging and initiation for Kent's eight sorori- 
ties, Panhellenic Council answers this question. 
Through its rush handbook, It's All Greek To 
Me, Panhellenic informs prospective Greeks of 
the women's sorority system on campus. And 
for those already in a sorority, the Council fos- 
ters a high-plane Greek life. Through various 
committees, it aims to further sound scholar- 
ship, to be a forum for discussion of questions 
of interest to the college and fraternity world 
and to maintain Greek membership standards. 
Last March the organization launched Junior 
Panhellenic, composed of pledges from all the 
sororities. The senior group works closely with 
Interfraternity Council in coordinating social 
activities and sponsors many recreational events 
including intramural sports and a picnic. 




Officers, l-r Jan Thomas, vice president; Polly Jones, president; Nancy 
Barkhurst, treasurer. 




Panhellenic Council, Front row, l-r: J. W. Wilbert, J. D. Hildebrandt, 
C. O. Ewing, J. R. Bessick, J. A. Ingham, G. L. Wilson, J. R. Krup- 
ienski, J. A. Thomas, P. G. Jones. Row 2: N. J. Gallatin, B, Smith, 
L. R. Hacker, J. A. Reynolds, M. E. Muesegaes, K. K. Krispinsky, S. 



M. Patterson, A. Dannes, J. C. Avery, C. J. Fisher, L. L. Shearer. 
Row 3: N. A. Barkhurst, B. A. Keitlanski, E. J. Fox, M. K. McHenry, 
C. L. Petraitis, M. Walters, A. Riley, N. Stanton, T. Hill. 



publications 




BUSINESS MANAGERS 
Don Woodcock, spring quarter; Ned Swanson, 
jail quarter; and Bob Voorhees, winter quarter. 



Kent Stater 



Familiar black and white pages of the Daily Kent Stater 
took on a "new look" in 1962 with an experiment in 
color. Brightening its eight-page Homecoming issue 
was the campus newspaper's first color photograph. As 
an experimental lab for journalism majors and minors, 
the Stater is a newspaper of, by and for the students. 
The publication's primary goal is to report all the ac- 
tivities in which the student population participates and 
to interpret the news in the most responsible way. It 
functions as a student forum, provides necessary infor- 
mation concerning campus activities, obtains student 
and faculty reactions to current topics and international 
affairs and reports on college life in general. The pa- 
per's code can be best summed up by the large sign in 
its Merrill Hall office, "Nothing Short of Right is 
Right." 




SHERRILL PALMER AND TOM SUCHAN 

Spring quarter Editor and Managing Editor. 



Kent Stater Staff, Front row, l-r: Bob McGruder, Bob Voorhees. Row 
2: Donna Foley, Jan Denman, Bill Bierman. Row 3: Al Gildzen, Diane 
Fostyk, Becky Sutton, Tony May, Violet Topalian. Row 4: Al McClean, 



Jerry Unroe, Isaac Pollock, Helen Yingling, Jan Shipman, Sandy Smith 
Linda Swinehart, Bobbie Gross. Row 5: Btob Cusick, Ron Clark, Tom 
Haas, Tom Suchan, Laird Brown. 




FALL EDITOR AND MANAGING EDITOR 

Thomas Suchan and Jan Denman. 



BOB McGRUDER AND TONY MAY 

Editor and Managing Editor for winter quarter. 



publications 



TOM SUCHAN 

Associate Editor 



JOHN ROSZKOWSKI 

Photo Editor 



ADVISOR 

Prof. Ricliard Goodrich 

BUSINESS STAFF 
Liz Tarr, John KIoss, business manager; 
Dick Kalz, assistant; and Sandra Osborne. 



CHUCK VAJDA 

Art Editor 

JOSIE PIZER 

Index Editor 

CHUCK ROCHE 
From Photo Editor to Navy Ensign. 



LITERARY AND COPY EDITORS 

Steve Weil and Alberta Wilkes 



SPORTS AND DRAMA EDITORS 
Bill Martin and David Freeman. 



RESEARCH EDITOR 

Gretchen Beirbaum. 




TYRANNICAL TRIO 
Their meetings had meetings. 





Chestnut Burr 



Since its inception almost 50 years ago, the Chestnut 
Burr has been gradually transformed from a 79-page 
memory book to the more than 300-page volume seen 
today. In 1914, the first Burr was compiled by the 
Walden Dramatic Club and presented to an all-woman 
senior class as a memoir of the founding year of Kent 
State Normal from a school which had its formal begin- 
ning in 1910. Now the yearbook serves a more vital 
function as a practical laboratory for journalism stu- 
dents. It is the hope of the 1963 Chestnut Burr staff 
that the work they have done on the book will not only 
benefit them but serve as a record of the school year for 
the campus. 



EDITOR BLUMEL 

"Think of something, Steve!" 



COPY STAFF 

Joan Rice, Alice McSweeney, Millie 
Sabo. Missing from picture: Gloria 
Conklin, Margaret Mitchell, Michi 
Molnar, Donna Borger. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Kathy Warren, Isaac Pollock, Marie Sliv- 
ka, George Telisman. 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 

Jeanette Substanley, Paul Knittel, Tony Jucaitis. 




communications 




••ALUMNUS ■• COORDINATORS 

Charles Vajda and Gerald Hayes. 



JACK WALAS 

Sports Information Director. 



JULIA WAIDA 

University Editor. 




Public Affairs 

Protecting and projecting the image of Kent State to 
local, state and national communications media is the 
job of the Office of Public Affairs. Under the direction 
of Dr. George C. Betts, the Public Affairs departments 
include the News Bureau, managed by James Bruss; an 
athletic information service; and the Office of the Uni- 
versity Editor, managed by Julia Waida. With six full- 
time staff members and eight student employees, the 
Office of Public Affairs maintains contacts with the 
mass media and presents the many phases of Kent's op- 
erations which appear before the public eye. In addi- 
tion to numerous publications, the office edits "The 
Alumnus," written by Gerald Hayes, alumni secretary.' 
To add to the efficiency of public relations the office 
recently acquired a new photography studio and mod- 
ernized darkroom facilities. It looks forward to the day 
when it will have direct press wire contacts ■with area 
and national newspapers, radio and television stations. 




Donald Shook, News Bureau As- 
sistant Director; George C. 
Betts, Public Affairs Director; 
James Bruss, News Bureau Di- 
rector; Eileen Gosche, secretary. 




CARL NOTHHAFT 

Campus news voice. 



WKSU-FM 



Frequency of 89.7, a 1,000-watt transmitter, 7.5 
kilowatts of power and a 50-mile broadcasting 
radius combine in WKSU Radio, FM. Kent's 
radio station is completely student operated 
under the supervision of Prof. J. C. Weiser. To 
augment the staff, various faculty members have 
programmed lectures and classes on their fields 
of interest. Relying on the resources of the 
University as much as possible, the station pre- 
sents "The Women's World," a regular feature 
given by a home economics major, and "News 
in Depth," a student analysis of one or two 
important news stories of the week. WKSU 
broadcasts also inform the surrounding com- 
munities of activities on campus. In addition 
to programs designed to give information on 
local, national and international problems, the 
station offers three serious musical broadcasts 
each day. The radio station, which was off the 
air from May, 1960, until September, 1962, 
plans to go AM for campus use this year. 



WKSU-FM 

On the air 



k^.i 



honorary 




Officers, l-r: Barbara Grills, historidit: Laurel Webster, secretary: Jean Salvador, president; Har- 
riet Posgay, vice president: Carole Kaliden, treasurer. 



Cardinal Key 



The women in white on Campus Day are members of Cardi- 
nal Key who traditionally march in the opening procession 
of this annual event. A national women's honor society, Car- 
dinal Key recognizes coeds outstanding in campus activities. 
With membership limited to 25, the honorary is guided by 
the precepts of scholarship, character, leadership and service. 
Juniors and seniors with a grade point average above the all- 
University women's average may petition to enter the group. 
Selected coeds carry large red keys to signify their pledgeship. 
Cardinal Key co-sponsors Penny Carnival, ushers for gradua- 
tion and presents scholaiships to deserving women students. 
Annually the organization pays tribute to an outstanding 
senior woman with its Womanhood Award. Prof. Dorcas An- 
derson advises the honorary. 




Cardinal Key, Front row, l-r: Julie Birch, Harriet Posgay, Joyce Bur- 
rell. Laurel Wilcox, Kayleene Payer, Laurel Webster, Janet Kadowaki, 
Libby Marino. Row 2: Karen Reagan, Judy Bond, Marsha Walters, 



Joan Bessick, Elmira Kendricks, Jean Salvador, Barbara Grills. Row 3: 
Carol McClain, Patricia Burgess, Linda Hedden, Elizabeth Bom, Carole 
Kaliden, Mary Ann Sila, Pat Murphy, Anita Miller. 



1M 



The social register of the campus, the student directory, is 
distributed annually by members of Blue Key, men's ac- 
tivities recognition organization. In addition to distribut- 
ing more than 1500 directories this year, the honorary of- 
fered scholarships to deserving men students as a service 
project. Established in 1924 at the University of Florida, 
the national collegiate honor society has 120 chapters 
throughout the country. Composed of 30 members, the 
local organization promotes service and scholarship among 
men. 



Blue Key 







'IT 


i ' 1^ ^ ^ jf ^ 




"'v ■: v: /^v 



Blue Key, Front row, l-r: Jim Vargo. Michael Stein. Dave Renninger. 
Row 2: Bill Wendell, Donald Woodcock, Bob Zaletal. Row 3: Ron Isele, 



James Murfin, Harold Stubbs, All Stinson. Row 
4: George Cody, George Jenkins, Jack Fristoe, 
Irwin Shulman. 



Annually the group co-sponsors Penny Carnival with Car- 
dinal Key. Blue Key's membership requirements are a 2.6 
accumulative average, leadership qualities and high morals. 
Under the direction of Assistant Dean of Men Benjamin 
McGinnis, the group sent representatives to the 16th Bi- 
ennial Blue Key Honorary Convention in Kansas City last 
year. 




Officers, l-r: Irwin Shulman, treasurer; 
Jack Fristoe, vice president; George Cody, 
recording secretary; George Jenkins, pres- 
ident. 




■r-^^ 1 .^^H^^^^ "^^ i 



If m ^ 



Tau Beta Sigma, Front row, l-r: Barb Fraser, Louise Foster, Marlene 
Mallarnee, Janice Guest, Virginia Ceroky, secretary; Shirley Hawk. 
Row 2: Michelle Gratis, Teddy Doleski, Jeanette Schroeder, vice presi- 



dent; Louise Masquelier, Kitty Johnston, Susan Hirschfield. Row 3: 
Janice Fisher, Lois Yund, Judy Weir, treasurer; Carolyn Morrow, 
parliamentarian; Joan Daniels. 



Tau Beta Slgraa 



Kappa Omicroii Phi 



Able hosts to every band visiting the campus are 17 mem- 
bers of Tau Beta Sigma, band honorary. The organization 
assists with KSU's band trips, district solo and ensemble 
contests and the annual Band Day. Membership is open 
to students with a 2.25 accumulative average in University 
work who have maintained a 3.5 average in the band for 
two consecutive quarters. Tau Beta Sigma promotes the 
existence and welfare of university bands. The honorary 
received honorable mention in Songfest and sponsored a 
fall mixer, spring banquet and numerous coke parties for 
freshman women. 



For future homemakers, a bulletin board in Kent Hall is 
kept up-to-date by members of Kappa Omicron Phi, home 
economics honorary. Kappa Omicron Phi recognizes high 
scholarship among home economics majors and minors. 
To join, women with a 2.5 accumulative University aver- 
age must complete 12 hours of home economics courses 
with a 3.0 average. The honorary attempts to make mem- 
bers aware of new developments in their field while fur- 
thering their poise and their appreciation for the sanctity 
of the home. Kappa Omicron Phi sponsors a tea for fresh- 
man home economics majors in the fall quarter. 




Kappa Omicron Phi, Front row, l-r: Frances Zeman, advisor; Marlene 
Mallarnee, president; Judith Finkel, second mce president; Carol 
Boyles, first vice president. Row 2: Glenda Chisholm, Barbara Zame- 



cnik, treasurer; Joyce Edgerton, Frances Dria, Carol Ebbert, secretary. 
Row ): Lillian Reed, Sue Hale, Doris Ramsey, Jean Rupert, Sandy 
Ruetenik. 




Pi Omega Pi, Seated, l-r: Marsha Walters, Nancy Dawes, corresponding sec- 
retary; Gail Mathes, president; Charlotte Cika. Standing: Margarete Schmid, 
Lucy Shaffer, Linda McGonigal, vice president; Sara Kraus, recording secre- 
tary; Karen Square. 



Pi OrQe2:a Pi 



The Crutch, a grammar handbook that helps students 
in business English, is published by the 12 members of 
Pi Omega Pi, business education honorary. Open to 
majors and minors in the field, Pi Omega Pi promotes 
scholarship while encouraging the civic betterment of 
schools and high ethical standards in business and pro- 
fessional life. Membership requirements include a 2.5 
overall accumulative average with a 3.0 in business and 
a 3.0 in four hours of education. Annually members pre- 
pare a panel discussion for freshmen in secretarial and 
business education. 



Delta Oraicron 



From opera trips to Christmas tree trimmings, the mem- 
bers of Delta Omicron plan a program aimed at music 
appreciation. The international fraternity for music 
majors and minors is open to students with a 3.0 aver- 
age in the field. It encourages performance among mu- 
sicians. Members usher at concerts and recitals and 
plan programs for community groups. The local chap- 
ter, Delta Upsilon, recently received the rotating schol- 
arship of the fraternity at its international conference. 




Delta Omicron, Front row, l-r: Michella Grates, Mary Ellen Cairns, president. Row 2: Sara Richmond, Janet Riedel, first vice 
president; Shirley Hawk, second vice president. Row 3: Carolyn Bell, Anita Agarand, Jan McGarry, secretary-treasurer. 



honorary 




Sigma Delta Chi, Seated, l-r: Bob McGruder, secretary; Prof. Harold Van- 
Winkle, advisor; Tom Haas, president: Bob Cusick, vice president; Tom 
Suchan, treasurer. Standing: Tony May, Bill Bierman, Jan Denman, Jerry 
Unroe, Larry Schrader, Laird Brown. 



Theta Sigma Phi 



Many deadline-harried editors may come from the ranks 
o£ Theta Sigma Phi, fraternity for women in journal- 
ism. Upon graduation members of the student chapter 
gain professional status in the national organization 
which unites women from all fields of communications. 
Installed on campus in 1951, Theta Sigma Phi intro- 
duces journalism majors and minors to professional life 
while recognizing high scholarship in the field. Women 
who wish to join must maintain a 2.5 overall accumula- 
tive average and a 3.0 average in journalism while ac- 
tively, participating in a University publication. An- 
nually members plan their banquet, the Matrix Table, 
and numerous professional meetings where journalists 
from the area speak on the press. 



Sigma Delta Chi 



Training grounds for Stater editors describes one func- 
tion of Sigma Delta Chi, professional society for men in 
journalism. Two fraternity members were recent direc- 
tors of the campus newspaper. Sigma Delta Chi ac- 
quaints journalism majors and minors with professional 
life and advances the standards of the press by fostering 
a high ethical code. The organization plans the High 
School Press Clinic each spring. Those who wish to join 
must maintain a 2.75 average in journalism and a 2.3 
overall accumulative average. 




Theta Sigma Phi Officers, Front row, l-r: Judy Starbuck, treasurer. 
Row 2: Alberta Wilkes, historian. Row 3: Sue Molnar, vice president; 
Marie Slivka, secretary. Row 4: Roberta Gabel, president. 



IM 




Epsilon Pi Tau, l-r: Gene Hatch, Matthias 
Rettig, president; Frank Huml, Ed Risler, 
Jeff Kasler, treasurer; Terry Davis. 



Epsilon Pi Tau 



Phi Alpha Theta 



Recognizing leadership in industrial arts and fostering re- 
search in this field is Epsilon Pi Tau, industrial arts honor- 
ary. Prospective members of the fraternity must have a 3.0 
average in their major and are carefully screened. Epsilon 
Pi Tau, established at Kent in 1949, promotes skill and 
proficiency among its members. Advised by Prof. Delmar 
Olson, the group centers its interests around demonstra- 
tions, movies, field trips and lectures involving material 
related to its major field. Alumni of the honorary often 
speak at meetings. This year "Experimental Curriculum in 
Industrial Arts" was presented by a former KSU Epsilon Pi 
Tau member. 



Historically speaking, Phi Alpha Theta reigns at the top on 
the Kent State campus. The group is Kent's department- 
sponsored history honorary. Among its various activities. 
Phi Alpha Theta sponsors talks by outstanding historians 
from our own faculty and from other universities and in- 
vites specialists from other professions to listen in and help 
lead discussions. The main purpose of the organization, 
which was founded in 1938 as a local historical association, 
is to promote an interest in history. Members are required 
to maintain a 3.0 accumulative average in history and a 3.0 
in two-thirds of all other courses. The group's advisor is 
Prof. Lawrence Kaplan. 




Phi Alpha Theta, Front row, l-r: Lyle Linville, vice president; Barbara 
Jo Snyder, Robert Appel, Rose Trbovich, Twila Zimmerman. Row S.- 



Kathleen Perdue, secretary; Donna HoUen, social chairman; Raymond 
Jirkans, president; John Patterson, Linda Hedden. 

161 




Pi Sigma Alpha, Front row, l-r: Richard Paige, Shing-Lang Yang, Don 
Rejkowski, Michael Morrell. Row 2: Robert Cameron, John Patterson, 
Rose Marie Trbovich. Row 3- William Green, Philip Anderla, Frank 



Pudloski, Darrell Ament, Jerry Green, Ronald Olbrysh. Behind group: 
Prof. Oscar Ibele. 



Pi Sigma Alpha 



The political scene certainly does not go unexamined here 
at Kent State. Promoting interest in statecraft as well as 
scholarship is the aim of the Alpha Omega chapter of Pi 
Sigma Alpha. Under the present direction of Prof. Oscar 
Ibele, the group, founded in 1950, strives to foster better 
scholarship in political science. Kent's chapter of Pi Sigma 
Alpha, one of over a hundred at various universities through- 
out the nation, frequently brings prominent speakers to the 
campus to discuss matters of public interest. The scholarly 
group requires for membership a 3.0 accumulative average 
in political science and a 2.6 overall average of majors in 
the field. 



honorary 



Phi Epsilon Kappa 



The President of the United States has promoted a program 
of mental alertness and physical fitness, a program that is 
conscientiously followed by the men of Phi Epsilon Kappa. 
Founded in 1934, the health and physical education honor- 
ary has concentrated on evaluating the ideals, ethics and 
standards of those engaged in health and physical education. 
Being able to do many push-ups is not a prerequisite for 
membership, but being able to push up grades to a 3.0 aver- 
age in your major and a 2.5 average overall is. Prospective 
members must be sophomores majoring or minoring in 
HPE. Guest speakers highlight the honorary's meetings, 
and its distinguished objectives highlight the organization. 



Phi Epsilon Kappa, Front row, l-r: Santo Pino, Jerry Hickerson, president; Richard Wiseman, guide; Kenneth Kreiner, vice 
president; Daniel Moore, Larry Brown. Row 2: Prof. Lawrence Golding, advisor; George Camp, Rudy Bachna, Ralph Par- 
dee, historian; James Bixler, secretary; James Weaver, treasurer; Prof. Roger Bishop, advisor. 




\ 




Pi Mu Epsilon, Front row, l-r: Michael Habenschuss, Yih-Tang Ling, 
Ann Ayres, Constance Lindquist, Anka Vaneff, Suzanne Pauline, Nola 
Troxell, Lois Wilson, president; Olga Kitrinou. Row 2: Tom Hinks, 
Kenneth Klouda, Robert Furey, Sigrid Wagner, Karen Stein, Joyce 
Burrell, James Thomas, Bonnie Pentz. Row 3: Eric Thompson, Melinda 



Chapman, Robert Schappelle, George Brulin, Duane Shie, Susan Hill, 
Gerry Kucinski, Lowell Cannon, Prof. Kenneth Cummins, advisor. Row 
4: Clifford Curtis, Wayne Brower, Marion Amick, Larry Nimon, Charles 
Cole, Douglas Cope, James Weaver, vice president; Richard Schooley, 
treasurer. 



Consider mathematics, the backbone of space-age technology. 
A typical meeting of the mathematics honorary, Pi Mu Ep- 
silon, may involve a discussion of the fact that integral of e 
to the X equals the function of u to the n. The group finds 
such topics eliminate the need for a speaker. Those of us 
who manage to solve the equation might still find it difficult 
to qualify for membership in the honorary. Completion of 
the entire calculus series, a 3.0 accumulative average and a 
3.25 average in mathematics qualify a math major for 
membership. 




Pi Mu Epsilon 



service 



Panel of Americans 



Race, Religion— these often avoided conversation topics ex- 
cite the Panel of Americans. A nationwide discussion pro- 
gram in inter-group education, the Panel of Americans ap- 
pears before both campus and community groups to discuss 
prejudice. Organized on campus four years ago, the panel 
consists of a Roman Catholic, a Negro, a Jew, a Protestant 
and a new American whose public speeches express their 
personal views on the racial and religious conflicts of the 
times. The only requirement for membership in the panel 
is an interest in furthering understanding among different 
peoples. Kent's 12 panel members, advised by Dean Glen 
Nygreen, are part of a national panel started at the Univer- 
sity of California. 

Panel of Americans, Front row, l-r: Pearl 
Maroff, Tom Nylund. Row 2: Roxie Har- 
ris, Paul Cheeks, president. Row 5: Marie 
D'Onofrio, Caroline Throckmorton, Elmira 
Kendricks. Row 4: Sandy Scarlett, Helene 
Coblitz, Joyce Carroll. 



service 



Golden K 



With a flair for organization, Golden K adds much to the 
immeasurable "school spirit." The revival of a card section 
last fall at football games resulted from Golden K's planning. 
Each University student is automatically a member of the 
club, and representatives from campus organizations, dormi- 
tories and off-campus students attend bimonthly meetings. 
Operating with Student Council funds. Golden K sponsors 
the cheerleaders, pep rallies, all-University mixers and bas- 
ketball half-time activities. By selling cushions at football 
games and mums during Homecoming, the group was able 
to aid the Flasherettes, women's precision drill team, in 
getting pom poms. Golden K plans Rowboat Regatta. 




Golden K Officers, Frotit row, l-r: June White, secretary; Nora 
Mottle, corresponding secretary. Roio 2: Rick Perkins, treas- 
urer: Bob Roberson, vice president. Row 3: Mark Smith, presi- 
dent. 




Cheerleaders, l-r: Judy Pettay, Becky Morrow, Julie Birch, Caryl Schissler, Jackie Purcell, Karen Smith. 




Alpha Phi Omega, Front row, I-r: Nitasna Pichitakul, John Newell, Jack 
Warren, Jay Whitman, Jim Walker, Hank Hillard, Donald Droulard. 



Row 2: William Lombard, Don Niece, Patrick McMahon, Jim Soos, 
Frank Borschel, Kenneth Rowe, Roger Hart, Gary Thornberry. 




Officers, l-r: Frank Borschel, Jr., treasurer; Jim Walker, pledging 
vice president; Jim Soos, projects vice president; Kenneth Rowe, 
president; Jack Warren, corresponding secretary; Jay Whitman, 
recording secretary. 



Alpha Phi Omega 



In our first week at Kent, we, perhaps unknowingly, became 
acquainted with the activities of Alpha Phi Omega. This 
service fraternity traditionally sponsors the New Student 
Program. Dedicated to "leadership, friendship, service," 
Alpha Phi Omega's members help recruit for the Blood 
Mobile and sponsor the annual quartet contest. Though 
officially delegated to ring the Victory Bell, they have not 
recently had opportunity to serve in this capacity. Com- 
munity-wide, Alpha Phi Omega aids local boy scouts and 
provides food baskets for needy families at Christmas and 
Easter. One of 300 chapters throughout the country, the 
service group was started at Kent in 1941. The primary re- 
quirement for prospective members is that they must have 
once been boy scouts. Alpha Phi Omega's service to itself 
includes an annual recognition banquet, a semi-formal dance 
and picnic. 



religious 




Newman Club. Fxml rmv. l-r: Joy Korpowski, Jean Hott. first vice pres- 
ident; Dick Sabol, Jim Dible, president; Dianne DiCorpo, Carole Dado, 
recording secretary. Row 2: Barbara Gaydar, second vice president; 
Teddy Doleski, Jerry Brezine, Margret Hott, Virginia Kosarko, corre- 



sponding secretary. Rote ?: Rita Rochlcr. James Collins, Richard 
Morrall, Kenneth Schneider, Jan Ochendowski, Sue Ellen Johnson. Row 
4: Father John Daum, chaplain; Ron Stesiak. Dick Meek, treasurer; Tom 
Tuckerman, Dave Kock, Tony Semanik, Prof. James Heddens, advisor. 



PRAYER 

Meditation at side attar. 




INSPIRATION 

Dedication to the Immaculate Heait of Mai y 







"I want a laity, not arrogant, not rash in speech, not 
disputatious, but men who know their religion, who 
enter into it, who know just where they stand, who 
know what they hold and what they do not, who know 
their creed so well that they can give an account of it, 
who know so much of history that they can defend it." 
Thus Cardinal John Henry Newman, more than a cen- 
tury ago, stated the guiding precept of Newman Club, 
the center of Catholicism on campus. To continue the 
education of members a newly completed Newman 
Center provides college-level courses in religion and 
serves a social and recreational function. Director and 
chaplain is Father John J. Daum. 



LITURGY 

Signal for communicants. 



Newraan Club 




CHAPEL 

Reflecting a credo in glass. 



Eastern Orthodox 
Fellowship 



To appreciate and share a wonderfully rich religious and 
cultural heritage is of prime import to members of the 
Eastern Orthodox Fellowship. Advisor Michael Dubetz as- 
sists the group in planning the lectures, vesper services, 
panel discussions and teas which serve to promote under- 
standing of the Orthodox faith. Once each quarter members 
assist in performing the Divine Liturgy. Social activities are 
not ignored as numerous hayrides, picnics and coffee hours 
will testify. Organized and established on Kent's campus in 
1955, the group continues to be of service to school and 
community. Together, the 25 members attend the Orthodox 
churches in Akron. 




Eastern Orthodox, Front row, l-r: Doris Blavos, Mary Ann Gaydos, 
Ludmilla Swyrydenko, Barbara Tome, Marie Grisak. Row 2: Carol Ros- 
enberger, Carol Kosa, Mary Ann Wolansky, Tom Leskovac. Row }: 



Jack Wakhkd, Anastasia Christos, Kay Ann Naymik, Steve Kirman, Bar- 
bara Kuratnick, Dareen Pawuk. 




Officers, Clockwise from top: Dareen Pawuk, president; Prof. Michael 
Dubetz, advisor; Mary Ann Walansky, secretary; Steve Kirman, vice 
president; Tom Leskovac, treasurer. 



Methodism on the University campus is rep- 
resented by the Wesley Foundation, a so- 
cial-cultural-religious organization formed 
25 years ago. Open to KSU's 1500 Methodist 
preference students and to those of other 
denominations, Wesley, under the direction 
of Rev. A. Duane Frayer, seeks to cultivate 
Christian Fellowship and to provide reli- 
gious training for its members. Next year 
Wesley looks forward to the opening of a 
Student Center, featuring a 12-sided chapel, 
which will be part of the new Kent Meth- 
odist Church on East Main Street. Wesley's 
activities include Sunday cost suppers, fo- 
rums, Wednesday chapel, religious discussion 
groups, Bible classes and coffee hours. This 
year two weekend retreats were undertaken 
at Camp Asbury, near Hiram. 




Wesley Foundation, Front row, l-r: Cindy Stine, Cam Fuller, secretary; Dora May Chambers. 
Roto 2: Irv Kundtz, Nancy Hofer, president. Row 3: Rev. A. Duane Frayer, chaplain; Linda 
Martin, social chairman; Gloria Miller, treasurer; Jim Cole, vice president; _ Marilyn Parker, 
publicity chairman. Row 4: Roy Hadden, Albert Wagner, Rich Lentz. 



Wesley Foundation 





religious 




MBM 




Kappa Phi 



Kappa Phi, Methodist women's service group, unites girls 
in friendship and common search for high spiritual values. 
First-place winner in Songfest for Independent Women last 
spring, the 80-member organization has been on campus 15 
years. Membership is open to all Methodist preference stu- 
dents who must go through a pledge period. Working under 
the motto, "Every Methodist woman in the university world 
today, a leader in the church of tomorrow," the chapter is 
part of a national group begun at the University of Kansas 
in 1916. Among its activities are an annual "Meal in the 
Upper Room" Tenebrae service, baby sitting for Kent Meth- 
odist Church members and entertainment for the Portage 
County Old Folks Home. Recently Kappa Phi won the Le 
Suerd Cup for most improved chapter in the nation. 



Pledges, Front row, l-r: Donna Fisher, Joy Kermode, Joyce Peters, 
Kathryn Thrush. Row 2: Janice Guest, Becky Gilger, Joyce Bell, 
Mary Ann Frame. Row 3: Wanda Thrustz, Janet Gabert, Carol 
Leedom, Karen Vansickle. Row 4: Joanne McAllister, Dawn Riebe, 
Pat Shively, Karol Keith. 




Kappa Phi, Front row, l-r: Cindy Stine, Sharlene Thomas, Ruth Davis, 
Sally Bryan, Sally Neff, Marlene Mallarnee, Sandra Sanders, Juanita 
Whisman, Joanne .Schroeder, Nancy Fagert, recording secretary; Ann 
Harding. Row 2: Neva Kitzmiller, Arlene Hladik, Rhonda Williams, 
Marianne Roper, Carol Yunaska, Mary Burnard, Carol Ebbert, Joyce 
Edgerton, Sue Cook, Katie Oltmanns, Row 3: Linda Kluiniemi, Mari- 
170 



lyn Gonder, Dianne Lindsey, Cam Fuller, Sue Elliott, Suzie Stonebraker, 
Suzanne Sterling, Linda Martin, Ginny Madden, Pat Dermak, Marilyn 
Tester. Row 4: Marilyn Parker, treasurer; Sue Brunt, Dora May Cham- 
bers, corresponding secretary; Joan Thomas, Marilu Ransom, Gloria 
Miller, first vice president; Dianne Parker, president; Janet Sigler, Gail 
Hutch, second vice president; Nancy Thomas. 




Sigma Theta Epsilon, Front row, 1-r: Roy Corpe, Jr., Jim Cole, Gerald 
Glovka. Row 2: Denny Keyerleber, Bill Almond, Larry Ebbert. Row 3: 
Irv Kundtz, Dennis Hagen, Robert Dod, Loy Westfall, Larry Thomas. 



Row 4: Bob Carnahan, Jerry Hickerson, .\lbert ^Vagner, Reed Harvey, 
Rich Purdy, Rich Lentz, Jay Albright. 




Officers, Front row, l-r: Gerald Glovka, pledgemaster. Row 2: Jerry 
Hickerson, chaplain; Reed Harvey, recording secretary. Row 3: Rick 
Lentz, historian; Rich Purdy, corresponding secretary . 



Sigma Theta 
Epsilon 




REVEREND FRAYER AND MISS MARTIN 
Previeii'ing what is to come. 



In an intensive pursuit of growth in mind and spirit, Sigma 
Theta Epsilon, men's Methodist service organization, aims 
at fellowship, leadership, training and service in the re- 
ligion. Membership requirements involve a pledge period 
for Methodist preference students. The group's ultimate 
goal is to acquaint Methodist men with the history, activi- 
ties and purpose of the church. Organized in 1925 at Iowa 
State University, Sigma Theta Epsilon came to Kent in 
1949. Its members usher at the Methodist church and 
plan a Thanksgiving service there with the women's service 
group. Kappa Phi. Proceeds from the service go for a 
Thanksgiving dinner for a needy Kent family. Annual 
events include a Founder's Day banquet and dance. In co- 
operation with Kappa Phi and Wesley Foundation, the 
group sponsors hayrides. 



religious 



Hillel 



To provide a comprehensive program fulfilling the re- 
ligious, social and cultural needs of the members of 
Jewish faith, while striving to gain a greater mutual 
understanding among members and with members of 
other religious denominations, is a task of no mean pro- 
portions. To this end Hillel is dedicated. Knowledge 
of the various faiths is a prime factor in fostering a 
mutual respect for religious beliefs of others, and Hillel 
sponsors Friday services, lectures, discussions and movies 
to aid in this capacity. However, knowledge of oneself 
is necessary before it can be imparted to another. Hillel 
seeks to instill in its members regard for their rich and 
ancient religious and cultural heritage. Advised by 
Emanuel Mandel, Hillel records the highest attendance 
percentage-wise of any other religious group on campus. 



KIBITZERS 

Miss Lockson and Mr. Feinber 




Hillel Olhecib, /■). Uoiiiia Lee Rose, executive vice president; Eman- 
uel Mandel, counselorsliip advisor; Sheldon Brodsky, treasurer: 
Steve Weil, administrative x)ice president; Bob Turk, president. 





PRESIDENT AND MISS BERNSTEIN 
Breaking the ice. 





Gamma Delta, Front rou\ l-r: Mary Jane Reigleman. Kathleen Booth, 
Nola Troxell. Paul Knittel, president; Ruth Dallmann, Heather Hock- 
ing, Mary Jane Van Horn, Francis Motyka. Row 2: Karen Raasch, 
Bonnie Cantrell, Miriam Bates, corresponding secretary: Louise Stock- 
haus, treasurer; Sharon Rolbuck, recording; secretary; Marion Petro, 



Marjorie Riehl. Row 5; Mark Heilman, Noreen Lahl. Rickie Greiner, 
Carol Yurtin, Marquita Schnider, Janet Duda, James Compton. Row 4: 
Rev. E. V. Brueggermann, advisor: Paul Woidtke, Edwald Sems, Carl 
Stunn, Ron Cramer, Bruce Larson, Robert Bechberger, Wayne Ollila. 




Christian Science Organization, Front rou<: Kaylene Geitz. Row 
2, l-r: Jill Robison, secretary: Amy Shaw, Row 3: Tom Baldwin, 
vice president; Judy DeForest, Sandy Clark, treasurer. Row 4: Scott 
Kleihauer, Harry Smythe, Frank Brown, Brent Kleihauer, president. 



Gamraa Delta 



Knowledge and Service are the ideals of Gamma Delta, na- 
tional Lutheran student association. In its ninth year on 
campus, Gamma Delta aims to foster religious knowledge 
through Bible study, the spread of a scriptural philosophy 
of life and the training of members for Christian service. 
Membership is open to any interested student who accepts 
the tenets of the Gamma Delta Constitution. The organi- 
zation sponsors square dances, films, hayrides and dinners. 
Services of the 30-member group include singing in the 
Lutheran Church choir and painting the chapel basement. 
Gamma Delta annually participates in the Northeastern 
Gamma Delta Convention, regional retreat and winter camp. 



Christian Science 



Opening a new year under a new director, the Christian 
Science Organization is dedicated to the principles of its 
mother church. Prof. Charles Keith this year succeeds Prof. 
Mona Fletcher, founder of the organization in 1948 and its 
sponsor for 14 years. Attempting to unite students in closer 
Christian fellowship, the group welcomes and encourages 
those beginning their study of Christian Science and offers 
them an opportunity to learn the truths of Christian Sci- 
ence as taught in the Bible and in Mary Baker Eddy's book. 
Science and Health, luith Key to the Scriptures. Each year, 
the organization sponsors a public lecture by a member of 
the Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church, Boston. 



professional 




Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Front row, l-r: Barbara Garland, Judy Reznicek, Lucile Cooper, Kerri Brewster, 
Esther Battista, corresponding secretary; Karen Willison, Barbara Barnes, vice president; Judy Galloway. Row S.- 
Gerald Hannay, treasurer; Elaine Martin, Merrillie Sibbald, Bobbi Finley, Jeanette Spelman, Patricia Stainbrook, 
Judy Carl. Row 3: Mary Coltman, president; Jerry Hickerson. Linus Breul, Fred Lamp, Linda McKinney, Ruth 
Roach, Sandy Thiel. Row 4: Harry Marchand, Thorn Kever, Jonathan Greve, Harold Shaw, Tony Howe, Pat 
Melcher, Louise Masquelier, recording secretary. 




Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society, Front row, l-r: Nitasna Pichitakul, Keith Clark, president; Donald Siano, 
vice president; David Willey, Nancy Lewandoski, secretary; Prof. Leslie J. Todd, advisor. Row 2: Ronald Hirko, treasurer; James 
Lawson, Harold Shaw, Donald Furey, Robert Furey. Row 3: Jerome Krispinsky, John Frick, David Friedel, Frank Borschel, Jr., 
Mark Carson. 



IVCF 



Cheraical Society 



Christian growth, Christian outreach and Christian respon- 
sibility are the main goals of the Inter-Varsity Christian 
Fellowship, an international religious organization. IVCF 
members aim to learn of the Christian life and of brother- 
hood among men through prayer, Bible study and social 
activities. Each year the group participates in conferences 
held at Camp Muskingum. Other events are summer camps 
and an International Student Missionary Convention with 
chapters attending from the entire country. 



In name only, the Kent State University Chapter of Student 
Affiliates of the American Chemical Society is the largest 
organization on campus. More commonly known as SAACS, 
the society installed in 1950, has a membership of 30. An 
interest in chemistry is the only requirement for local mem- 
bership. SAACS affords an opportunity for students of simi- 
lar interest to become better acquainted while taking part 
in professional association and gaining experience in pre- 
senting scientific material before audiences. 




Industrial Arts 



One campus organization has the distinction of being part 
of the federal government. The former Kent State Indus- 
trial Arts Club came under jurisdiction of the Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare, Washington, D.C., last 
spring when it voted to affiliate with the American Indus- 
trial Arts Association in this government agency. The new 
student chapter of AIAA acquaints industrial arts majors 
and minors in the College of Education with subjects re- 
lated to their field of interest. Panel discussions help stu- 
dents with problems concerning industrial arts teacher edu- 
cation. Annual social activities of the group include a 
Christmas party, pancake supper and banquet. 



Officers, Clockwise from top: Margaret Richard, executive board mem- 
ber; Ron Rainey, publicity chairman; Marion Harrison, secretary; John 
Kleeh, membership chairman; R. Louis Gysler, vice president; CHfford 
Olm, social chairman; Dennis Zinz, president. 




Student Chapter of the American Industrial Arts Association, Front 
row, l-r: John Kleeh, Dan Wilkin, Dennis Zinz, Marion Harrison, Mar- 
garet Richard, Gerald Quintiliani, Gary Delter, Prof. M. B. Rotnem, 
advisor. Row 2: Jerry Holt, Pete Lawson, Gary Burnett, Clifford Old, 



William Guentzler, Tom Wilford, Eric Painter, Gary Fair. Row 5: Ron 
Rainey, Ron Sabol, Lowell Zurbuch, R. Louis Gysler, Frank Huml, 
Ralph Klinger, Benjamin Thomas, Taylor Richard, Luther Schneider. 

17S 



professional 



© B 




Society for Advancement of Management, Front row, l-r: Roger Magill, 
Ronald Galitskv, Thomas Kikendall, Richard Evans, Lee Alexander, 
Carol Malotky, Reed Harvey, Walter Vlaszk, Richard Vlasak. Row 2: 
Don Discenzo, San DeAngelo, Ralph Myers, George Disberger, James 
White, Robert Balinski, Joe Megery, Prof. Joseph Schwitter, advisor. 



Row 3: Ronald Reedick, Taras Zenczak, Dennis Sykora, James Daniels, 
Howard Craig, William Kvet, Robert Hagmeyer, Richard Eaton. Row 
4: Howard Ranen, Roy Hadden, Richard Paysor, Joseph Dylag, Thomas 
Barto, John Mead, Larry Ahern, Fred Bohnenstengel. 




Manageraent Society 



Some future leaders of American industry may well come 
from among the 40 students who compose the Society for 
the Advancement of Management. Dedicated to fostering 
an early awareness of the problems, policies and methods of 
industry and management, the group is open to sophomores, 
juniors and seniors who desire preparation for a business 
career. Among the professional organization's benefits are 
a year's subscription to the Advanced Management - O^^ice 
Executive magazine, field trips to area industries, speeches 
by prominent men in management and the annual SAM 
banquet. Under the guidance of Prof. Joseph Schwitter, the 
group dedicates itself to the promotion and advancement of 
the art and science of management. 



Officers, Clockwise from top: Ronald Reedick, 
treasurer: Fred Bohnenstengel, vice president: 
Prof. Joseph P. Schwitter, adxnsor: Richard Pay- 
sor, president; George Disberger, secretary. 




Phi Gamma Nu, Front row, l-r: Lucy Shaf- 
fer, scribe; Gretchen Clutterbuck, Janet Zac- 
zek, Karen Square, Barb Fraser. Row 2: Lin- 
da McGonigal, Tina Danko, treasurer; Sara 
Kraus. Nancy Dawes, corresponding secre- 
tary; Kitty Johnston, president. Row 3: Prof. 
Louise Wheeler, advisor; Betty Brinkerhoff, 
Marilu Ober, Margarete Schmid, recording 
secretary; Carole Kaliden, vice president; Jan 
McGarry. 



Phi Gaixima Nu 



Aerospace Sciences 



Attention, male business majors: Phi Gamma Nu serves 
the businessmen o£ tomorrow by preparing efficient future 
secretaries now. An honorary for women in office admin- 
istration and business education. Phi Gamma Nu develops 
within members pride in maintaining high professional 
and personal standards. A coed with a 2.7 accumulative 
average who has completed 60 hours of University work 
with nine hours in commerce is qualified for membership 
in the organization, founded on campus in 1951. A na- 
tional service project of Phi Gamma Nu provides portable 
typewriters for use of veterans hospital patients. Advisor 
Prof. Louis Wheeler coordinates the activities of the 19 
members. 



Now building a satellite tracking station on campus, the 
Institute of Aerospace Sciences was formed to further in- 
terest in aerospace by providing a gathering place for in- 
terested members and by distributing information on the 
subject. It maintains a technical library and provides films 
and these topics on aerospace science. The Kent chapter 
meets monthly with the Cleveland-Akron section of IAS. 
Chartered by the national organization, IAS sent represent- 
atives to the national convention in Chicago last October. 
IAS presents two awards to members: a lecturer's award 
and an award for academic achievement. Membership, 
now 30, is open to majors in aerospace technology, math- 
ematics, physics or life sciences. 




Aerospace Sciences, Front row, l-r: Samuel T. Hannan, Jr., Richard 
E. Dreher, vice-chairman; Lawrence E. Pence, chairman; EUyn L. 
Black, Russell K. Herig, treasurer; Stuart E. Scott, secretary. Row 2: 
Prof. Marshall Garrett, advisor; Gary L. Wilhelm, David S. Lehn- 



hardt, Peter J. Savoy, Gilbert M. Jaffe, Fred Frantiani. Row }: Ronald 
B. Stanley, Robert W. Brown, Richard Bray, James Shelly, Robert 
Lee Osborne, Donald Fowler. 



honorary 



PROF. JAMES K. OLSEN 

Director of Honors Program. 





Laurels 



If leadership and character are among your qualities as a 
junior woman, look to Laurels, senior women's honorary. 
Through service activities, such as sponsoring the award of 
the President's Medal for the graduate with the highest 
accumulative average. Laurels aims to promote a feeling 
of loyalty to the University. Junior women with a mini- 
mum accumulative average of 3.01 are recommended for 
membership in the group by faculty members, and are 
tapped on Honors Day each spring. Started in 1955 as a 
local honorary, "Duerna," and renamed in 1956, Laurels 
hopes to affiliate with Mortar Board, national honorary. 
To advance the spirit of service and fellowship among 
Kent women, Laurels ushers for Honors Day, Commence- 
ment and plays and obtains the speaker for the Associated 
Women Students' Presidents Banquet. High standards of 
scholarship are encouraged by the group through its se- 
lection of an outstanding sophomore woman and sponsor- 
ship of a reception for students in the Honors Program. 
Members sell corsages for Mothers Weekend. 



Laurels, Front row, l-r: Laurel Wilcox, treasurer; Laurel Webster, president. 

Row 2: Jean Salvador, secretary; Barbara Grills, Row 3: Nancy Barkhurst, 

vice-president; Carole Kaliden, Linda Hedden, Bette Blakslee, publicity 
chairman. 



171 




Kappa Delta Pi, Front row, l-r: Carol Joy Eiitson, Elizabeth Born, 
vice-president; Bonnie Loomis. Row 2: Jo Ann Reynolds, Jean Salva- 
dor, president; Laurel Wilcox. Row 3: Betty Riggenbach, Marguerite 



Harris, Dorothy Graver, Phyllis Moore, Terry Davis. Standing: John 
Durance, counselor. 



Kappa Delta Pi 




READERS 

Putting aims of Kappa Delta Pi into practice. 



Reading, writing and 'rithmatic form the three R's upper- 
most in the minds of members of Kappa Delta Pi, national 
honor society in education. Persons who exhibit com- 
mendable personal qualities, worthy educational ideals 
and sound scholarship are invited to belong to the honor- 
ary. Juniors and seniors in the College of Education who 
have maintained a 3.0 accumulative average and who have 
completed seven or more hours of education courses are 
eligible for membership in the group. Kappa Delta Pi 
strives to encourage high professional, intellectual and per- 
sonal standards and to recognize outstanding contributions 
to education. Annually the honorary awards the Amos T. 
Herr Scholarship to an outstanding senior in the College 
of Education who demonstrates interest in teaching. Each 
year Kappa Delta Pi brings to the campus an outstanding 
figure in the teaching field to speak at its Educational 
Leadership Day banquet. Prof. Glenn Maynard and Prof. 
John Durance advise Kappa Delta Pi. 



professional 



Delta Psi Kappa, Front row, l-r: Barbara 
Grills, chaplain; Karen Horky, secretaij; 
Judy Showers, treasurer; Joyce Burrell, 
publicity; Rosemary Benesh, vice presi- 
dent. Row 2: Marie Boarman, Laurel 
AVilcox, president: Harriet Posgay. Chris 
Schroeder. Row 3: Prof. Virginia Harvey, 
advisor; Vange Wolcott. Bonnie Loomis, 
pledge mistress; Joyce Widenor, Carol Mc- 
Glain. 




Delta Psi Kappa 



HPE Club 



To promote professional attitudes among women of 
high scholarship in the health, physical education and 
recreation fields, Delta Psi Kappa was established on 
campus in 1950. The professional HPE honorary re- 
quires members to maintain a 3.0 accumulative average 
in physical education or recreation and a 2.5 average 
overall. The 20 women of Delta Psi Kappa strive to be 
of service to the HPE department and to the University. 
Members assist in departmental activities and sponsor 
the Manners for Majors program, a party for graduating 
members and a mother-faculty tea during Mothers Week- 
end. The local Alpha Omicron chapter holds one pro- 
fessional meeting each quarter. 



Joining together brains and brawn is the function of 
Kent's Health and Physical Education Club. Members 
of the organization learn of the professional and intel- 
lectual aspects of the health and physical education 
field, along with exercising their muscles. Under the 
guidance of advisors Prof. Delores Peter and Prof. Ron- 
ald Bos, the 100 HPE Club members carry on a program 
to stimulate interest in the profession for mental and 
social benefits. This year's activities included a fall fun 
night and splash party, a Christmas party, a spring camp- 
ing weekend and the annual HPE banquet. Member- 
ship in the organization is open to majors and minors in 
physical education, recreation and health education. 



HPE Club. Front row, l-r: Mary Lee Schisler, Barbara Huml, Norma 
Martin, Marie Boarman, Jan Munger, Bonnie Loomis, treasurer: Judy 
Showers, Laurel Wilcox, Betty Latta, Patty Moore, Judy Pcetay. Row 
2: Prof, Delores Peter, advisor; Jan McCleery, Maria Martini, Karen 
Smith, Frances Bingman, Jean Ann Majick, secretary; Dick Ondrey, 



Patty Taylor, Mary Ann Buckosh, Nancy Sanera, Theresa Williams, 
Row 3: Linda Hamilton, Charles Kittle, Mike Fernella, Todd Win- 
ning, Nancy Thomas, Judy Schell, Dorothy Topie, Marilyn Moran, 
Pat Yuill, Kathy Strinbrny, Margie Fichard. 




Scale model buildings fill Van Deusen gallery each 
spring when the student chapter of the American Insti- 
tute of Architects presents its annual display of proj- 
ects. AIA was established on campus in 1955 to provide 
a transition from student standing to the professional 
standing of an architect. Members of AIA are archi- 
tecture majors who have completed 16 hours of Univer- 
sity work. AIA sends delegates to the organization's na- 
tional convention, sponsors conferences on campus fea- 
turing guest speakers and encourages original projects 
from members. An annual event of the group is its 
summer banquet. Prof. Joseph Morbito advises AIA 
members. 



AIA 




Officers, clockwise jrom top: Prof. 
Joseph F. Morbito, advisor; John 
Gruitza, treasurer; Joseph Shuster, 
vice-president; James Murfin, presi- 
dent; Louis Gilbert!, secretary. 




AIA, Front row, l-r: John Gruitza, Joseph Shuster, Inary Less, Nova 
Silverthorn, Prof. Joseph F. Morbito, Edward McCarthy, Louis Gil- 
berti, Rebecca Smith, John Braun. Row 2: Ann Dunning, Robert 
Maron, Ray Grahain, Bob Breinke, John Dragash, Joseph Marchey, 
David Roth, David Harris, Tarey LuUen. Row 3: Frank Eliner, Aurel 



Pamfilie, Allan Zelina, Kenneth Tuskes, Tom Burrow, Carl Walter, 
Ray George, Richard Fisher, Arthur Sichau, Dave Lopatich. Row 4: 
Frank Sturgeon, John Balint, Keith Marty, Arthur Howie, James 
Reinbolt, James Murfin, William Charvat, Ed Pickard, John Hobart. 



professional 




ACE, Front row, l-r: Ester Battista. Lynda Engle, Pauline Terry 
Kawai, Mary Kazmaier. Carol Barrett. Nancv FioRino, Pam Myers, 
Nancy Peura, Claire Gambatese, Virginia Greene, Lynne Bromra, Lois 
Anderson. Row 2: Karen Valentine, Fran Kovacs, Karen Raasch, 
Wanda Louie, Janet Kadowaki, Sally Bryan, Loni Yutzey, Phyllis 
Kisiel, Caryl Shissler, Geri Marx, Francine Goldstein, Nora Mottl. 



Row 5: Patricia O'Brien, Lucile Cooper, Mary Ellen Logan, Barbara 
Garland, Mary McManamon, Margaret Misch. Donna Heidy, Barbara 
Barnes, Jane Mittendorf, Bev Hoffman, Charlotte Hughes. Row 4: 
Marilyn Kramer, Elaine Holden, Janet Donaldson, Karol Krispinsky, 
Diane Borchik, Barbara Forbes, Sharon Moser, Jeanette Schroeder, 
Louise Slockhaus, Nancy DuBey, Jean Lilley, Lynne Brandes. 



ACE 



Known on campus as the Kindergarten Club in the 
1920's, the Association of Childhood Education has 
"grown up" into an internationally affiliated education 
organization. The 150 members are majors in elemen- 
tary, special or early childhood education who aim to 
raise the standards of teacher preparation. Informing 
the public of children's needs, ACE shows how the 
school program must be adjusted to meet these needs. 
Annually members hold a Christmas Party for children 
and sponsor an open house tea. 



ACE, Front row, l-r: Mary Stephens, Jean Lanzi, president; Judy Beck- 
man, Carole Foskie, Carole Dado, Jacqueline Bruck, Phyllis Morre, 
Carol Kissel, Marlene Heppert, Sandy Herbert, Jean Kellar, Rosemary 
Kosey. Row 2: Karen Springer, Carol Rosenberger, Sue Kerner, Nancy 
A. Peterson, Bonnie Shimandle, Barbara Gaydar, Linda Johnston, 
Ginger Murdock, Helen Shelby, Marion Capra. Janice Goodhart, Doris 
Blavos. Row 3: Barbara Tome, Ludmilla Swyrydenko, Mayris Lind, 



Sue Gall, Sandy Murdock, Barbara Pfender, Sharon Fails, Priscilla 
Lodge, Barbara Campbell, Patricia Cedervall, Deanna Knight, Bonita 
Gordon. Row 4: Karen Dean, Janice Bodmann, Bonnie Adams, Bar- 
bara Kietlanske, Stephanie Hajduk, Laurie Johnson, Ruthmary Kohler, 
Priscilla Sharp, Darlene Luce, Patricia Newdome, Gloria Miller, 
Sandy Scarlett. 





SEA, Front roxv, l-r: Carol Kissel, Carol Rocco, Sunda Anderson, Amy 
-Shaw, Rosemary Losey, Judy Medas, Wanda Louie, Sharon Yoder, 
Diane Gerber, secretary; Norma Martin, Lynne Marchiore, Lynne 
Bromm, Norma Ball. Row 2: Karen Lincavage, Kay Hotchkiss, Jeanne 
Emons, Sue Elliott, Karen Willison, Pauline Terry Kawai, Patricia 
Cedervall, Bev Robertson; Lay Ann Naymik, Melodic Miller, Anne 
Harding, Dorothy Graver. Row 3: Nora Mottl, Diane Borchik, Bar- 



bara Warman, president; Helen Shelby. Cam Fuller, Pat Heestand, 
Marilyn Wenzlick, Christine Vaicaitis, Deanna Knight, Judy Carl, 
treasurer; Shirley Reiter, Kathie Schneiter. Roiu 4: Barbara Phender, 
Dorothy Doerrer, Joan Lube, Ruthmary Kohler, Barbara Barlow, 
Duane Shie, Sharon Pike, Marilyn Hilliard, Richard Uthe, Janet Duda, 
Pat Forrest, Bonita Gordon. 



If you answer "Yes" to the frequently asked question, 
"Are you an education major?", the Student Education 
Association is the group for you. Membership is open 
to anyone in the College of Education. The organiza- 
tion aims to promote leadership, to spread understand- 
ing of teaching as a career and to encourage contact 
with others in the field by participating in professional 
activities at local, state and national levels. The Kent 
SEA chapter is affiliated with both the Ohio and the 
National Education Associations, and each member re- 
ceives the monthly journals of these organizations. 
SEA's various campus and community services include 
High School Day, an attempt to show high school Fu- 
ture Teacher Associations what college will be like, par- 
ticularly in the field of teacher training. 



SEA 




SEA, Front row, l-r: Judy Johnson, Gayle Weatherly, Miriam Negin, 
Joyce Peters, Mary Etta Stewart, Ann Ohitmer, Kathie Oltmanns, 
Violet Topalion, Arleen Kwcharek, Linda Overcasher, Janet Zaczek, 
Mary Ann Markulis, Janet Kadowaki. Row 2: Christine Alexander, 
Sally Neft, Sharlene Thomas, Harriet Posgay, Carol Schuller, Marsha 
Walters, Marlene Burger, Lois Strausser, Judy Gilmore, Nancy Jas- 
inske, Barbara Jo Snyder, Nina Ronshausen, vice president. Row 3: 



Gwendolyn Bennett, Doronda Crihfield, Karla Ptak, Janet Class, Bar- 
bara Corbett, Patricia Lo Prcsti, Ann Addis, Heide Tkocz, James 
Denes, Jean Salvador, Terry Kramer. Row 4: Marilyn Henderson, 
publicity chairman; Beverly Reynolds, Sue Hill, Donna Hollen, Mari- 
lyn Kreitler, Jean Scharf, Anthony Lobello, Elizabeth Born, Sheryl 
Vecchio, Nancy Riddle, Gary Bittner, Virginia Rila. Carl Sturm. 

183 



military 



Sponsors, 1-r: Paula Amato, honor- 
ary captain; Brenda Turlington, 
honorary captain. 





Officers, 1-r: Michael Downs, 2nd lieutenant; Larry LeHowicz, 1st lieu- 
teyiant; \Valter Vlasak, captain; John Sweeney, 1st lieutenant; Norman 
Dent, 1st sergeant. 







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Pershing Rifles, Front row, l-r: John Czar, Sy Frazzini, Roman Ra- 
kowsky, Dennis Hutchison, Robin Stroh, Dave Jacobs. Row 2: Ray 
Curley, Russ Grootegoed, Gary Ritzert, Don Sarabrook, Dave Foreman. 



Row 3: George Suchy, Lewis DeWeese, Thomas Boland, James Brown, 
Robert Suchan. 




Pledges, Front row, l-r: Gerald Crosby, Gary York, Wayne Durieux, 
Kevin Bowling, Gary Janson, Robert Stacho, Douglas Seward, Ray- 
mond Kline. Row 2: Robert Heiser, Kenneth Fraleigh, Mike Lehmil- 
ler, David Jeffries, Bob Walker, Ward Peters, John Royer, Bob Shep- 



ard, Garrett Cuinpson. Roio 3: David Stepanek, Bill McMains, Bill 
Park, Bill Dillender, Gary Thornberry, Thomas Kirila, Dan Keene, 
Steven Bell, Richard Wilkins. 



First place in the Regimental Drill Meet last year is 
one of many honors won by Company K, First Regi- 
ment of Pershing Rifles. Over a four-year period, Com- 
pany K has won 20 drill trophies at meets throughout 
the country. Pershing Rifles, largest United States mili- 
tary fraternity, was founded in 1894 by General John J. 
Pershing to uphold the highest ideals of army organiza- 
tion. It aims to instill in Army ROTC cadets discipline, 
sense of duty and good officer traits. The organization 
is composed of 52 outstanding ROTC members who 
must go through an 11 -week pledge period. Members 
provide the flag raising detail at home football games 
and act as ushers in the stands. Social activities include 
the Pershing Rifles Annual Initiation Dance and the 
Military Ball. Company K chose Brenda Turlington 
and Paula Amato as this year's honorary sponsors. 



Pershing Rifles 




Advisors, l-r: Major William E. 
Johnson Jr., Sergeant First Class 
James W. Arnold. 




Sponsors, l-r: Marilyn Wahl 
honorary captain; Gay Gruber, 
major; Barbara Ball, major 
Phyllis Crasler, honorary colo 
nel; Betty Jo Wollam, lieuten 
ant colonel; Jayne Paryzek, hon 
orary major; Holly Wilbert 
captain. 



military 



Angel Flight 



Angel Flight, Front row, l-r: Bar- 
bara Ball, jirst lieutenant comp- 
troller; Holly Wilbert, first lieu- 
tenant liaison; Nancy Woodrow, 
first lieutenant ISO; Jayne Paryzek, 
captain executive commander; But- 
tons Fuller, Marilyn Wahl, first 
lieutenant; Gail Frease, second lieu- 
tenant pledge trainer; Judy Basset- 
ti, first lieutenant ASO. Row S.- 
Phyllis Perry, Linda Kay Brinker- 



hoff, Diane Evershed, Carol Pasa- 
cic, Joan Dewey, Nancy Jane Pet- 
erson, Betty Chinn. Row 3: Kathy 
Moran, Sharon Lockart, Marie Yu- 
kich, Gwendolyn Bennett, Pat Mc- 
Donald, Eileen Spisak, Melanie 
Rose, Kitty Johnston. Row 4: Lynne 
Maser, Bonnie Thayer, Lois Katz, 
Angle Bazen, Marlene Weirick, 
Helen Crouch, Dawne Butler. 







Arnold Air Society 



Arnold Air Society, Front row, l-r: William Rogers, information officer; Russell Herig, executive officer; Lawrence Pence, commander; 
Marilyn Wahl, sponsor; Jerry Kaliszewski, operations officer; Harvey Wensel, administration officer; Mark Heilman. Row 2: Gerald 
Chunat, James Cebulski, Jim Colligan, Al Stinson, Jahn Fasick Jr., David Rynearson. Row 3: Bruce Bechtel, chaplain; Michael On- 
drasek, John Reichart, Charles Fagert, Richard Reese, Richard Suder, Michael Riley, Ronald Williams. 





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Air Force ROTC 




Golden Eagles, Front row, l-r: Michael O'Connor, comptroller; John Reichart, 
administrative officer; Fred Deiger, deputy commander; William Burchett, 
commander; John Drotos, sergeant at arms; Michael Ondracek, information 
service officer. Row 2: Alan Burton, James Miller, Richard Dreher, Richard 
Reese, Gilbert Jaffe. Row }: Lee Trotter, Don Gorczyca, John Perkins, Frank 
Kocour, James Smith, Richard Seasey. Row 4: Paul Cackowski, Wayne Wolf, 
Bobby Vanderpool, Kenneth Palek, Thomas Pearch. 



Golden Eae:les 



Silver Eagles 



Silver Eagles, Front row, l-r: Richard Popio, James Colligan, William Rogers, 
commander; Marilyn Wahl, sponsor: David Rynearson, executive officer: Mark 
Heilman, administrative sergeant. Row 2: Robert Jones, Ted Sabo, comptroller 
and recruit sergeant; Frederick Brown, Bruce Pickford, operations officer; Larry 
Prather, material sergeant and flight sergeant; William Mascara. Row 3: James 
Francis, William Gaskell, Roger Hart, Martin Schaeffer, 'WilUam Dwyer Jr., 
Raymond Murphy. Roio 4: David Whitaker, Dick Bistline, James Rieger, John 
Perme, flight guide; Virgil Kasperavicius, information service: Patrick Coffield. 




ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY joined with 
the Kent Welfare Department last spring 
in renovating a building to be used as a 
recreation center for underprivileged chil- 
dren. Besides serving the community, the 
society's 23 members sponsor activities 
ranging from the Military Ball to hayrides 
and splash parties. A professional and so- 
cial organization of Air Force ROTC ca- 
dets who wish to further their military 
knowledge and to interest the campus in 
air and space power, the society received 
the best squadron award for this area in 
1962. Cadets with a 2.5 accumulative av- 
erage and a 3.0 in air science are eligible 
for membership. 

GOLDEN EAGLES. A gold cord on the 
shoulder of an AFROTC cadet signifies 
that he is a member of Golden Eagles, the 
AFROTC rifle team. Founded in 1960 for 
men interested in marksmanship, Golden 
Eagles schedules shooting matches through- 
out the year. Cadets who gain active sta- 
tus in the group after a one-quarter pledge 
period are awarded their gold cords. 

SILVER EAGLES. Most recent honor 
of Silver Eagles, AFROTC precision drill 
team, is first place in the Ohio State Drill 
Meet last May. Membership in the march- 
ing group is open to cadets who possess 
high military bearing and perseverance. 
Besides marching in community parades, 
on ROTC Day and Memorial Day and at 
local basketball games, the group holds so- 
cial gatherings with Angel Flight. 

ANGEL FLIGHT. Thirty-six females in- 
vade Kent's military world to add a touch 
of beauty to the Air Force ROTC. Angel 
Flight, organized in 1960 as an auxiliary 
of Arnold Air Society, is the official hostess 
group of the campus. Its military tactics 
include marching in school parades and 
promoting the Army-Air Force basketball 
game winter quarter. Besides assisting the 
air society in its functions. Angel Flight 
sponsors a Mothers' Weekend tea and par- 
ticipates in national flight conclaves. 



military 




Officers: T. Everett Doll, 1st lieutenant: Roy Hadden, captain; Joan Mc- 
Kenzie, honorary captain; Captain Phillip B. Smith, advisor; John Desmone, 
2nd lieutenant; Mathias Strommer, 1st sergeant. 



Scabbard and Blade 

Scabbard and Blade, national honorary open to junior 
and senior men enrolled in military science, encourages 
the formation of quality army officers. Founded in 1904 
at the University of Wisconsin, Scabbard and Blade was 
chartered at Kent in 1949 as M Company, Eighth Regi- 
ment. Members are advanced cadets of excellent mili- 
tary standing in Army ROTC who go through a pledge 
period and pass a written examination. Social activities 
include a dance each quarter. Scabbard and Blade pro- 
vides the saber arch for the Homecoming game and 
dance, ROTC Day game and Military Ball. It also par- 
ticipates in a national convention every two years. Joan 
McKenzie is sponsor for the honorary 's 31 members. 




Scabbard and Blade, Front row, l-r: George Landis, Richard Vinci- 
querra, John Desmone, James Vargo, Joan McKenzie, Ted Olczak, 
Robert Furey, William Havas, Gary Carnicom. Row 2: T. Everett 
Doll, Gary Jones, John Pershern, Clifford Riidd, Walter Vlasak, James 



Hayes, John Welton, Mathias Strommer, Roy Hadden. Row 3: Capt. 
Phillip B. Smith, William Lamont, Thomas Maslyk, David Bowman, 
Thomas Miller, Thomas Peetz, Daniel Dixon, Ted Root, Robert Voor- 
hees. 



188 




interest 



Merrymen 

Smorgasbord is for singing, not eating. At least "The 
Merrymen Sing Smorgasbord," a record cut by the male 
chorus, presents a smorgasbord of 14 tunes from jazz 
to calypso. The chorus of 37 students from the men's 
residence halls endeavors to provide the campus and 
community with versatile singing. Since its organization 
in 1957, the glee club has performed before more than 
25,000 people. Members are volunteers who have passed 
an audition and who give two hours a week to practice. 
Annually the group presents a Christmas and a spring 
concert in addition to appearing in Pork Barrel. They 
have entertained over the radio and at civic gatherings 
which ranged from bowling banquets to women's club 
meetings. When the men are not busy with concerts, 
they serenade the girls' residence halls. 




Officers, l-r: Richard Germana, secretary; Rex Zirbes, advisor; Bob Rieth, 
vice president; Bob Woods, president; Bill Sisunik, publicity chairman; Wil- 
liam Nail, treasurer; Dick Worthing, director. 




Merrymen, Front row, l-r; James Collins, Lou Telerico, Jerome Ko- 
walski, James McCallum, Richard Worthing, director; Rex Zirbes, 
advisor; Garry Takacs, Jim Walker, Richard Germana, secretary; Fred 
Lamp. Row 2; Mike Lehmiller, Paul Woidtke, Larry F. Elliott, Gary 
Miller, Jack Gillman, Mike Kirtley, John Rietz, Robert DeMarco, 



Tom Mayernick, Jim Reed. Row 3: Edwin Bartholomew, Peter Brown, 
Robert Stacho, Robert Woods, president; Don Weaver, Gerald Bang- 
hart Jr., Pete Marvin, John Streppa, Robert Lloyd, David McLean. 
Row 4: Bruce Bechtel, William Nail, Richard Sayre, Phil Simcox, 
Dave Keith, Mark Schaeffer, Ken Neuzil. Bill Sisunik, Bob Rieth. 



189 



choral groups 




.' • ••* •*/ *■' 



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A Cappella Choir, Front row, l-r: Irene DiChiro, Janet Reidel, Karen 
Belcastro, Melinie Miller, Ann MacCracken, Mae Goldsmith, Carol 
Goldner, Pat Daily, Lucy Redick, Sandra Wunderlich, Donna Steele, 
Loretta Couch, Mary Leath. Row 2: Judy Lomos, Linda Kiviniemi, 
Mary Ellen Cairns, Linda Campbell, Carolyn Bell, Nancy Ritter, Geor- 
gia Profusek, Marsha Craft, Laura Roberts, Sharon Lockart, Sara Rich- 



mond, Barbara Strong. Row 3: Sue Sterling, Gerald Kujalu, James 
Hailey, George Parker, Robert Janes, David Lima, Harlan Coleridge, 
Gordon Caudill, Jerry Kowalski, Tim Whitman, Dan Hursey. Row 4: 
Allen Schaffer, J. Marsh Lane, John Thomas, Roy Corpe, Jim Rousch, 
Dennis Congos, Rick Sayer, John Boron, Howard McDonald, Stanley 
Arner, Ted Root. 



A Cappella Choir 




\ 



Madrigals 



Madrigal Singers, Clockwise from 
bottom: Loretta Couch, Sharon 
Lockart, Laura Roberts, Howard 
McDonald, Rick Sayer, Roy Corpe, 
Richard Dinwittie, John Boron, 
Linda Campbell, Judy Lomos. 



Men's 
Glee Club 



Men's Glee Club, Front row, 1-r: S. C. Lou- 
den, accompanist; J. W. Biros, R, H, Morton, 
J. L, Atwood, D. F. Jacobs, L. I, Coe, R. 
B. Dencer, R. E. Rottman, J. R. Ross, F. 
S. Stillings, director. Row 2: J. F, Yurtinus, 
R. E. Haley, R. D. Worthing, M. M. Bur- 
nett, P. J. Donnellan, J. D. Rawlings, R. R. 
Boston, O. N. Parish. Row 3: J. B. Wilder, 
T. R. Gill, P. J. Melcher, R. F. Redington, 
K. R. Granville, J. M. Rhodes, R. A. Groot- 
egoed, R. E. Uthe. Row ■): D. M. Shankleton, 
J. W. Hampton, W. R. Gable, J. C. Hultin, 
J. P. Rausch, C. R. Rose, R. E. Taylor, 
M. Wasserman. 




A CAPPELLA CHOIR is one of the 

University's best public relations media. 
The 51 voice choir represents the campus 
in concerts throughout the state and has 
received wide acclaim for its professional 
renditions. Under the direction of Prof. 
Robert H. Foulkes, A Cappella Choir fa- 
miliarizes its members with religious clas- 
sics by master composers. 

MADRIGALS. A small, highly selective 
organization, the Madrigal Singers are ad- 
vanced students from the A Cappella Choir. 
The 12 members accompany the choir on 
concert tours to the surrounding communi- 
ties and perform in the "Messiah" with 
Oratorio Guild each Christmas. 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB, organized in 1957 
by Prof. John White, tries to build an ap- 
preciation for finer music and to develop 



the talents of its members. The chorus 
traditionally sings the Alma Mater at the 
opening of Campus Day Songfest each 
spring. The group appears at various high 
schools during the year and presents an 
annual spring concert for the University. 
Directed by Prof. Frank S. Stillings, it has 
41 members. 

WOMEN'S CHORUS. Christmas carols 
joyfully break the library silence each De- 
cember when the University's Women's 
Chorus presents its annual program in the 
first-floor lounge. The glee club performs 
both sacred and secular music under the 
direction of Prof. Ralph E. Hartzell. In 
addition to the library concert, the group 
appears in other events throughout the 
year. In existence since the founding of 
the School of Music, the Chorus has as its 
purpose the vocal training of members. 



Women's Chorus, Front row, l-r: Amy Shaw, Ruth Broderick, Karen Martz, Lou Ann Smith, Charlene Moore, Judy Zigler. 
Row 2: Trudy Laughinghouse, Zenovia Tarczanyn, Mary Shanks, Arleen Kucharek, Lynn Bromm, Barbara DuRose, Sherry 
Gynn, Jeannie McComb, Prof. Ralph Hartzell, director. Row J: Roger Gustatson, graduate assistant; Vickie Thorp, Janice Nun- 
isto, Elizabeth Price, Carol Kemp, Margaret Cooper, Barbara Danko, Jean Glotzbach, Sally Robinson, Ann Hastings, Connie 
Cowan. Row 4: Wilma Strachan, Marilyn Young, Mary Helen Trough, Gerry Mowinski, Carol Keith, Nancy Hyle, Sandra 
Graban, Dianne Perkins, Mary Lynne Hinkle, Alexis Kramer, Cathie Leathers. Row 5; Diane Taylor, Sandra Mills, Sue Brant, 
Sonja Sherbechuk, Martha Locke, Kathleen Stebbins, Jacque DeCosmo, Carol Mansfield, Marie Slivka, Susan Groh. 



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WRA 



A beautiful contribution to the sports' scene at Kent 
is the feminine intercollegiate field hockey team, spon- 
sored by the Women's Recreation Association. WRA 
promotes both the intercollegiate and intramural sports 
program for women students through clubs in all phases 
of athletics. WRA offers planned intercollegiate activi- 
ties in field hockey, volleyball, basketball, swimming, 
tennis, gymnastics and dance. Intramural competition 
includes bowling, Softball and table tennis. Advised by 
Prof. Fay Biles, the organization boasts the membership 
of all University women. It is governed by a 50-mem- 
ber board. 




WRA, Front row, l-r: Judy Showers, Theresa Williams, Harriet Pos- 
gay, recording secretary: Joan Sheplin, vice president; Maria Martini, 
Betty Latta, Louise Bailey. Row 2: Carol Wood, Judith Seufer, Bar- 
bara Grills, president; Marie Rebell, Pat McDonald, Josselyn Sanborn, 



secretary-treasurer; Nancy Saners. Row }: Margaret Johnson, Marilyn 
Hilliard, Marianne Tretinik, Norma Grills, Barbara Stamm, Frances 
Bingman, Judith Derrick, Marie Boarman, intramural manager. 




Englisli Club 



"A bit of all right," the 100 English Club members term 
their organization. This literary group on campus recognizes 
harmonious student-faculty relationships to be one of the 
most valuable aspects of college life. The English Club en- 
courages these relationships and in doing so strives to stim- 
ulate interest in the English language through speakers and 
discussions on poetry, literature and drama. The English 
Club, founded at the University in 1946, welcomes to its 
membership any student with a sincere interest in this field. 




English Club, Front row, l-r: Barbara Henkel, Judi Stephens, Becky 
Morrow, Terri Swanson, Priscilla Borden, Frank Romano, Paula Gor- 
retta, Nancy Wannemacher, president; Grayce Lewis, Karen Adair, Viv- 
ian Petrison. Row 2: Prof. Edgar L. McCormick, advisor; Lindalee 
Knowles, Barbara Kuratnick, Carol Sanderson, vice president; Pete Pav- 
lick, Nancy Jasinski, Beverly Turpack, Maryanna Michl, Jean Sitler, 



Grayce Johnson, Bev Robertson, Prof. Dorothy V. Diles, advisor. Row 3: 
Karen Miller, Sandra Huetter, Judy Dunlap, Christine Alexander, Char 
Szanyi, Kathy Mills, Carole Mikash, Eileen Wack, Eilleen Chiaramonte, 
Linda Yethers, Patricia Elser. Row 4: Karla Ptak, Jan Denman, Bob 
McCullagh, Sheila Spicer, Janet Wilson, Dick Bistline, Anne Addis, 
Julia Havron, Dave Edwards, Joyce Tice, Marianne Brown. 



© r^ 




English Club, Front row, l-r: Barbara Danzey, Anne Lyday, Olga Kit- 
rinou, Kay ann Naymik, Joyce Ervin, Jackie Todd, Eloise Taylor, Sharon 
Yoder, Linda Kay Brinkerhoff, Phyllis Perry, Eloise Gentry, Nancy Rick- 
ert. Row 2: Donna Fails, Kathie Leathers, Pat Heestand, Barbara Shun- 
ders, Carolyn Alba, Terry Kramer, Elaine Farrell, Steve Yoke, Christine 
Vaicaitis, Carol Ann Baker, Carol Jeanne Rocco. Row 3: Sharon Salzer, 



Carol Lutkus, Beverly Reynolds, Dorothy Doerrer, Gretchen Bierbaum, 
Gary Bittner, Georgia Phillips, Winston Crausaz, Christine Jaskela, Karen 
Stein, DeRonda Hogue, Peg Daugherty. Row 4: Christine Godfrey, Al 
Gildzen, Mark Wagler, Bill Gable, J. W. Remington, Phil Sinicox, Ron 
Thoman, John Coup, James Karcomb, Edward Kinney, Gene Brown, 
Robert Young, Edward Brutte. 

193 



University Theatre, Front row, l-r: Jack Kostel- 
nik, Jean Spencer, Magdaline Conomos, Patricia 
Prechtel. Row 2: Judy Gill, Bunny Ballance. 
Lino Amatangelo. Row 3: Patty Capel, Bette 
Blakslee, Bruce Collins, R. Frederick Hughes. 
Row 4: Raymond Fenn, Roger Place, Prof. Wil- 
liam H. Zucchero, associate director; Richard 
Basehart. 




University Theatre 



interest 



Centering on the philosophy that "the play's the thing . . . ," 
the University Theatre makes participation in the theatre 
arts available to all students. Directed by G. Harry Wright, 
UT provides opportunities for active participation in thea- 
tre with the aim of adding practical experience to theoretical 
instruction. Founded in 1931 by Prof. E. Turner Stump, the 
organization now presents plays in a theatre named for him. 
Since its inception, the University Theatre has produced 
over 225 full-length plays and hundreds of one-acts. The 
Theatre is a Group Member of the Americair National Thea- 
tre and Academy and is represented at its annual meeting 
in New York each winter. Faculty staff members who par- 
ticipate ill UT activities are members of the American Edu- 
cational Theatre Association. 



Alpha Psi Oraega 



Alpha Psi Omega, dramatics honorary, has the distinction 
of being the first national honorary on the University cam- 
pus. Chartered in 1929, the local chapter seeks to promote 
excellence in dramatic arts and is open to those who earn 
100 points by participation in acting or backstage work in 
University Theatre productions. The group recognizes out- 
standing individuals in University Theatre activities at an 
annual awards banquet. Under the advisorship of Prof. Wil- 
liam H. Zucchero, the honorary serves both a social and a 
service function for budding actors, actresses and workers 
in all phases of the dramatic arts. 



Alpha Psi Omega, Front row, l-r: Patty Capel 
Bunny Ballance, secretary-treasurer; John Bern 
abei, Ann Ayres, corresponding secretary; Ro- 
berta Farquhar, Lino Amatangelo. Row 2: Bent 
Deckert, Judy Gill, James Atwood, Patricia 
Prechtel, Prof. William H. Zucchero, advisor. 
Row 3: Roy Corp, vice president; R. Frederick 
Hughes, Magdaline Conomos, Bette Blakslee, 
president; Jean Spencer, Row 4: Bruce Collins, 
Raymond Fenn, Terry Corley, Richard Base- 
hart, Roger Place, Jack Kostelnik. 
194 





MARKSMEN 

Loudest group on campus. 




Officers, Front row, l-r: Donna Brown, treasurer; Judith 
Conrad, secretary. Row 2: Eugene Ecremenr, president; 
Edward Kinney. I'ice president. 



Rifle Club 



One of the loudest groups on campus is the Kent State Rifle 
and Pistol Club. Founded in the fall of 1961, the group 
makes its first appearance in the Chestnut Burr this year. 
Under the advisorship of Sgt. James Arnold, Air Force 
ROTC, the club strives to promote an understanding of 
firearms, as well as to develop a skill in the use of them. 
These sharpshooters conduct separate weekly classes and 
matches for both rifle and pistol training. Besides holding 
monthly joint meetings, the forty members sponsor a spe- 
cial program or trip each month. The Rifle and Pistol Club 
has no strict membership requirements, but those who wish 
to join must be students at Kent State. 




Rifle and Pistol Club, Front row, l-r: Jesse Wallace, Bonita Leedy, Linda 
Overcasher, Anne Fedorevich, Connie Cowan, Nina Olsen, Judy Rich- 
ards, Priscilla Borden. Row 2: Jerry Gesche, Marjory Dudley, Hilde- 
garde Pevec, Donna Brown, Judith Conrad, Judy McEIroy, Mary Jeanne 
Forgue, Paul Turner. Row 3: Don Niece, Michele Hornyak, Marquita 



Schneider, Jim James, Priscilla Sharp, Gary Donovan, John Baker, 
Carlyle Harris. Row 4: Steve Dianiska, Edward R. Kinney, Harvey 
Phillips, Herbert Terry, Guy Shirk, Ugene Ecrement, Ronald Deibel, 

Frank Stark. 

19S 



Flasherettes, Front row, l-r: Nancy Dawes, secre- 
tary, co-captain; Joan Lube, treasurer; Britta 
Carlson, president; Jan Sperry, vice president; 
Kathleen Wegman, co-captain. Row 2: Penny 
Espelage, Lynda Miller, Sandra Guinta, Joyce 
Kramer, Barbara Huml, Nancy Gustafson, Lynne 
Marchiore, Sharon Yoder, Chris Kikta, Mary Lee 
Schisler. Row 3: Heidi Steel, Judy Evans, Dar- 
lene Donofrio, Betty Beardshall, Betty Jo Smart, 
Pat ^\'agner, Sandi Takis, Judy West, Elaine 
Farrell, Judi Cracraft. Row -t: Marilyn Kreitler, 
Janice Bender, Carole Amersback, Mary Ann 
Vassos, Elaine Henneges, Diane Richardson, 
Cheryle Lux, Dianne Edmonds. Millie Noel, 
Bonnie Adams. 




ik^. 'i«e'> ^Ikr . 








Sailing Club, Front row, l-r: Kaye Klug, Cathy Price, Sandra Gould, Lynne Bromm, Betty Orrill, Lois Anderson, Betsy 
Canfield, commodore; Linda Swinehart, Louise Bailey, Marti Callahan, Lucile Cooper, Judy Pusateri, Barb Sabula. Row 2: 
Susan Swasey, Jan McCleery. Colleen Donovan, Pat Heestand, Bev Robertson, Karen Springer, Carol D'Amico, Al Lambo, 
fleet captain; Rhonda \Villiams, Lois Freshwater, Diane Shively, Ellen Ladd, Virgene Thome. Row 5; Joan Zanella, Martha 
Griffeth, Ronald Vodarska, Barbara Hatch, Nancy Hyle, Phyllis Robertson, racing secretary; Jay Stephens, racing team 
captain; Bill Parker, Lillian Reed, Stacy Crossen, historian; Sue Brunt, Leslie Ann Carby, Jennifer St. George, Bemacine 
Zub. Row -f: Janet Wilson, Joanne Malco, Lynn Heichel, Tom Watts, Klaus Bauer, James Rausch, Pat Clyne, treasurer; 
Dick Houchin, Allan McNeill, Marsha Jones, Anne Serknis, Marilyn Taggart, Joyce Zygmunt, Gayle Johnson. 



Flasherettes 



Sailing Club 



"Eighty attractive legs keeping time to a march beat" de- 
scribes the Flasherettes, women's precision drill team. Or- 
ganized in 1960 under the sponsorship of Golden K, the 
Flasherettes perform at football and basketball half-time 
breaks and in before-game parades. Joined to promote 
school spirit, the Flasherettes permit university women to 
increase their sense of citizenship, leadership and sportsman- 
ship. Membership in the group is based on talent displayed 
by the individual during tryouts. Grade requirements are 
a 2.0 accumulative average and a 2.0 previous quarter. The 
Flasherettes, with Golden K and the cheerleaders, assist in 
supporting the Student Activities Board. 

196 



Acquisition of two new sailboats, thereby tripling their 
flotilla, is the latest achievement of the members of the 
Kent State University Sailing Club. Organized in April, 
1962, the club has enjoyed phenomenal growth while initiat- 
ing its members in the intricacies of sailing. Awards of first- 
place in the Western Reserve Academy Regatta and of sec- 
ond-place in the Interlake Yacht Sailing Association Annual 
Regatta testify to the skill of the 58 members. When not 
sailing, the group attends various regattas throughout the 
Midwest and holds armchair regattas, which are strictly so- 
cial. Membership in the Sailing Club is third largest in the 
Midwest Collegiate Sailing Association. 




Ukrainian Club, Front row, l-r: Luba Steciak, Anna Jakymico, Martha 
Olinkevych, Zenovia Tarezanyn, treasurer; Oksana Pihulak, Tania 
Fedorowycz, secretary; Kwitka Saluk, Ola Ratochka. Row 2: Helen 



Melnyk, Maria Fur, Roman Rakowsky, Walter Swyrydenko, George 
Kulczyckyj, president; Zenovia Nimylowycz, Romana Wyrsta. 



Ukrainian Club 



Meddent Club 



"Dobriy den!" "Good day!" is the gieeting bound to be 
heard at a meeting of Kent's only nationality organization— 
the Ukrainian Club. Its members are students of Ukrainian 
descent who wish to keep alive the culture and customs of 
their nationality. Under the advisorship of Prof. Russell 
Iwanchuk, mathematics, the group participated in the an- 
nual International Festival with national dances and a dis- 
play. In existence since 1955, the group sponsored a concert 
by the Ukrainian male chorus, Dnipro, on campus last year. 



A guarantee against the hypocritical practice of the Hippo- 
cratic Oath lies in early membership in the Meddent Club. 
Members include pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-nursing, med- 
ical technology and pre-pharmacy students. Started in 1955, 
Meddents binds together students of similar interest. Med- 
dents provides films and lectures by professionals at its bi- 
monthly meetings to stimulate an appreciation of the im- 
portance of pre-medical education. Included in the program 
are frequent field trips to medical and dental schools. 



Meddent Club, Front row, l-r: Elizabeth Romito, Nitasma Pichitakul, 
William Hunter, Marilyn Willis, Barbara Bazzone, Joan Limburg. Row 
2: Vicki Straight, secretary; Gayle Jenkins, Susan Pattee, Karen Jones, 
Helen Auning, treasurer. Row }: David Knox, president; Judy Weir, 



Betsy Williams, Leann Stehler, James Williams, vice president. Row 4: 
David Farris, John Graves, Prof. Kenneth Kelly, advisor; Robert Thomas, 
Frank Dittrich. 






social 



Kent 
Internationals 



The capable hand of the Kent Internationals reaches out 
to welcome the foreign students who come to Kent each year. 
This organization is composed of foreign and American 
students interested in introducing the newcomers to our 
country and our customs. And through the Internationals, 
the foreign students are afforded opportunities to present 
their way of life. Through co-sponsorship of an Interna- 
tional Festival each spring and through visits by members 
to various civic, church and social groups in the area, the 
organization founded in 1958 fosters better understanding 
between foreign students, the campus and community. In 
addition to biweekly meetings and social programs, the In- 
ternationals annually hold the Autumn and the Embassy 
balls. Any enrolled student is eligible for membership. 




Officers, Front row, l-r: Barbara Meadows, executive committee; Olga 
Kitrinou, secretary; Esther Baldauf, treasurer. Row 2: Mary Ellen 
Mowels, executive committee , Carrie Fellouzis, executive committee. Row 
i; Young Sek-Man, executive committee; Andy Butler, president; Ali 
Amir-Parvis, vice president. Row 4: Ahmad Abdallah, executive com- 
mittee; Dean Mark Anthony, advisor. 




Kent Internationals, Front row, l-r: Sandra Kay Yearaans, Yuen-Ram 
Kan, Phyllis Crawford, Antigone Telemachos, Bertha Ellis, Nancy Neay, 
Angelique Telemachos, Ingrid Johnson, Laila Arhippaineh, Wanda 
Louie. Row 2: Nitasna Pichitakul, Norman Zaw Wong, Nadwa Sharif, 
Murray Tuckerman, Adan Abdi Hussein, Yusuf Osman, Manouchehr 
Movahedi, Antoine Blaise Abele, Daniel Bemba. Row }: Shing-Lang 
198 



Yang, Atsuo Kurihara, Nguyen Xnan Diem, Rivai Jusuf, Robert Maron, 
Alban Clairmont, Abraham Ebaka, Bob Butler. Row 4: Soleiman Ab- 
dolrasouli, Hushang Aldad, Alex Iswarienko, Wladimir Orloff, Thomas 
Nylund, Richard Reese, Harold Shaw, Allan McNeill, Asmail Ali As- , 
mail, 




] 



t^^h^m. 



Officers, Front row, l-r: Helen Eshler, 
treasurer; Barbara Zamicnik, social 
chairman; Joyce Edgerton, president. 
Row 2: Prof. Betty J. Saneholtz, ad- 
visor; Nancy Cox, secretary: Carol 
Boyles, social chairman. 




Home Economics Club, Front row, l-r: Patricia Ann Hall, Sandy Crelli, 
Nancy May, Sandra Hamm, Frances Giffin, Diane Hunt, Marlene Mal- 
larnee, Frances Dria, Joyce Edgerton, Janet Fleischer, Carol Ebbert. 
Row 2: Dorothy Tihansky, Carolyn Schindler, Carol Boyles, Sandra 
Steitz, Marty Clark, Virginia Shea, Helen Eshler, Diane Marshall, Barb- 



ara Zamecnik, Mary Alice Roszkowski. Sandy Ruetenik. Row 3; Sara 
Timlin, Mary Alice Cause, Kathie Stebbins, Nancy Cox, Norma Grills, 
Doris Ramsey, Lillian Reed, Jean Rupert, Dorothy Seaman, Prof. Betty 
J. Saneholtz, advisor. 



Some American males' middle-age spreads might one day 
be attributed to the culinary arts of members of the Home 
Economics Club. Among their varied activities, women in 
the Home Ec Club prepare an annual Christmas dinner and 
Buddy Picnic for freshmen. The purpose of the organization 
is to promote and to interpret the Ohio Home Economics 
Association and the American Home Economics program to 
its 55 members. These girls maintain the Home Ec Library 
and sell football programs at the Flashes' contests. Repre- 
sentatives attend the Ohio Home Economics Association 
meeting every spring. 



Home Econoraics 





jThis is , 

Wh£l?E lo 
Cau StstjOf- 

The LftKe-Dww^^ 





Residence Halls 



From the weathered walls of Lowry Hall to 
the unfinished stories of the U-shape dor- 
mitories, we find a place for students to call 
their own during their stay at KSU. The 
11 residence halls seek an atmosphere that 
will capture the warmth of home for 3,800 
inhabitants. By offering cultural and social 
activities, the halls afford centers of relaxation 
away from the world of the classroom, as well 
as serve the essential function of being places 
of study. Each dwelling is the natural scene 
of the problems, joys and hopes in the life of 
each student as he prepares for the future. 
Each hall, it seems to us, admirably succeeds 
in being a center of warmth and security for 
hundreds who dwell within. 




Lowry Hall 



Founded in 1912 as Kent's first residence hall, Lowry cele- 
brated its semicentennial this fall with a Homecoming tea, 
honoring both KSU alumni and former Lowry residents. 
Lowry's proximity to Merrill Hall, especially on the sprawl- 
ing campus, is a wonderful thing. Its cafeteria affords resi- 
dents the privilege of lulling over a 7:50 a.m. cups of cofEee 
and of still being on time for 8 o'clock classes. The 140 
coed residents can take pride in the name of Lowry. The 
hall was named for James H. Lowry who introduced the 
legislative bill in the Ohio Senate that provided for the 
establishment of the University. The residence is unique 
in its closing hours' honors system— girls are trusted to sign 
in on time without the watchful eyes of counselors and to 
report their own lateness. This spring Lowry took second 
place in Songfest for Independent Women. 




LOWRY HALL HOSPITALITY 

Without the watchful eyes of counselors. 




Lowry Hall, Front row, l-r: Jean Valigora, Karen Michener, Nola Trox- 
ell, treasurer; Libby Marino, president; Barbara Simmons, vice presi- 
dent; Karen Mueller, secretary; Joyce Kramer. Row 2: Elizabeth Lukes, 
Carol Mayer, Kay McGowan, Sandy Clem, Hildegarde Pevec, Susan 
202 



McClelland. Row 3: Karen Zamberlan, Martha Elliott, Rebecca Wil- 
liams, Marquita Schneider, Phyllis Seifried, Barbara Stamm, Nancy , 
Goodman. 




TIN PAN ALLEY 
"And then I wrote . . ." 



PARTY LINE 

"Gee, Tom, 1 had no idea you would call.' 



FEMININE STRATEGISTS 

t A break from the books. 





LOWRY'S ASPCA 

Misses Chinn, Fogarty, Lahl and Tarczanyn 



Moulton Hall 



It isn't every coed living on campus who has 32 roommates. 
But each woman in Moulton Hall's "Pipe Alley" has this 
privilege. In the residence hall's basement, "Pipe Alley" 
houses the overflow of coeds who request to live on campus 
fall quarter. These temporary living facilities substitute 
for single and triple rooms, and girls in the basement will 
eventually be relocated. A brighter side of the residence 
hall (something not to be sneezed at) is the second-place 
trophy in Women's Residence Hall Division for Homecom- 
ing displays for Little Lulu and a Kleenex box, "One Touch- 
down up Pops Another." Whether it will be the plumbing 
or Lulu that will be remembered most by residents, both 
will add to Moulton's character, a character that has been 
developed since 1917. 





MISSES CANNING, TITO, TOWN AND KENYON 

A jew notes after classes. 



MISS PERRY 

A struggle for silence. 




MISSES CENDRICK AND ANDERSON 

Love-twenty, but she has a winning smile. 




MISSES MOLNAR. SHII.TS AND WORLEY 

Somethine nol to be sneezed at. 




FINALS FLURRY 
Foot loose, not fancy free. 




Moulton Hall. Front row, l-r: Helen Thiry, Andrea Liberator, treas- 
urer; Patricia Tito, vice president; Nancy Town, president; Judy Spring, 
secretary; Barbara Molnar. Roiu 2: Judy Mandusky, Rhonda Held, Eliz- 
abeth Born, Barbara Sheidler, Mary Jean Schroeder, Jo Little, Linda 



Lenox, Mary Cindrich, Betty Latta. Roio 3: Judy Cairns, Dorothy Topic. 
Sandy Clark, Pat Smith, Pat Mackil, Ida Hoste, Eloise Gentry, Pat 
Frye, Jane Critchfield. 

205 



Engleman Hall 



The 242 University women who live in Engleman Hall, 
named for the former president of Kent, keep active through- 
out the year with hall parties, dances, picnics, fireside chats, 
open house and discussions. Under the guidance of resident 
counselor Ruth Williamson, the hall seeks to provide an 
atmosphere conducive both to study and relaxation. This 
year Engleman women displayed their humanitarian in- 
stincts with the adoption of an Italian foster child, 12-year- 
old Giancolo Tucci. Annually the dormitory has a dance at 
the Cleveland Boys' Industrial School, Hudson. Lending 
their feminine touch, the women of Engleman decorated 
the gyms for this year's Homecoming Dance. 




Engleman Hall, Front row, l-r: Pearl Maroff, social education chairman; 
Patricia Chenot, Susie Carter, Karen Jones, president; Wanda Louie, 
vice president; Linda Kurtz, Carol Sue Sheller. Row 2: Anne DuPriest, 
Carla Manzi, Theresa Williams, Judith Crabbs, Beatrice Anne Harding, 



secretary; Barbara Kirby, Scottie Estep, Carole Minter. Row 2: Barbara 
Garland, Judy Starbuck, Linda Clay, Roberta Smith, Patti Shore, Donna 
Heidy, treasurer; Linda Garrett. 




206 



LIMBO PARTY 

Games and Rhythms, HPE 222. 

ENGLEMAN WORKERS 
A lot of hot air for a 'cool' Homecoming display. 




Terrace Hall 



aL ^ ^ 



fill 



"X" marks the spot. The L-shaped wing 
of North Terrace Hall meets the L of 
South Terrace to form the X-shaped, 
largest dormitory on campus. Terrace 
is home to 726 women. Built in 1955, it 
is the oldest of the "new" residence halls 
at Kent. Hall activities are geared to 
promoting the physical, mental, social 
and spiritual tenets of the University. 
Under the guidance of counselor Audre 
Durbin, Terrace girls undertake a vari- 
ety of activities. Included in the year's 
program were open houses, mixers and 
a Christmas tea to which faculty was in- 
vited. An Apple Polisher Social was re- 
cently initiated as an informal meeting 
of students with faculty. The residents 
plan a Christmas party for welfare chil- 
dren and attend several social functions 
at the Cleveland Boys' Industrial School, 
Hudson. Terrace had the largest rep- 
resentation at the Intercollegiate Associ- 
ated Women Students State Day at Deni- 
son University. 




Terrace Hall, Front row, l-r: Ellen Ragon, vice president; Neva Kitz- 
miller. president: Margaret Marshall, treasurer. Row 2: Carol Edmunds, 
Sandra Kunsman, Pat Trende, Lynore Mackenzie, Dottie Kirk, Nancy 
Dennis, Dee Albertson. Row 3: Judy Johnson, Sharon Brookover, Evelyn 
Mohrman, Helen Shelby, Doris Ramsey, Phyllis Crawford, Jan Sperry, 



Donna Borger, Aviene Hladik. How 4: Areta Malynowsky, Theresa 
Marie Fries, Diana DeSantis, Carole Edwards, Sharon Roebuck, Bonnie 
Shimandle, Bonnie Adams, Karen Stone, Arleen Kucharek. Row 5; 
Carol Petrie, Pamela Brislen, Stephanie Brumage, Eileen Croce, Bonita 
Gordon, Deanna Knight, Patricia LoPresti, Janet Burch, Thaya Kuhn. 




PRIMPER WITH PROMPTERS 

And all he'll do is mess it up. 



BELLER AND AGGRESSOR 

X marks the spot. 








MARY DECAPUA AND MISS DURBIN 

"Advise and Consent." 





PRE-PARADE PUSH 

Climax to weeks of planning. 



Judicial Board, l-r: Elaine Farrell, Kathy Mills, Barbara Lipinski. Helen Beidle, 
Sally Wilson, Dianne Fowler, Brenda Brewer, Gail Hutch, Iris Brown. Kneeling: 
Ellen Ragon, chairman. 




TERRACE CAFETERIA 

Serving food for thought. 



Dunbar Hall 



Slimmin', trimmin' exercise sessions highlight Dunbar 
Hall's agenda of activities. As part of its social educa- 
tion program, the hall sponsors knitting and bridge les- 
sons in addition to speakers and cultural programs for 
the benefit of residents. Dunbar, named in honor of the 
University's first librarian, opened ofEcially in 1959 to 
house men students and became a women's hall in 1961. 
Under the guidance of counselor Sandra Fee, the 374 
residents keep busy through the year with mixers, an 
inter-dormitory formal and publication of the "Dunbar 
Dynamo," biweekly newspaper. Service projects include 
sending coeds to parties at Cleveland Boys' Industrial 
School and preparing a Christmas food basket for a 
needy family. Dunbar captured second-place awards 
for its Homecoming display and Campus Day float. 





Dunbar Hall, Front row, l-r: Dee Ambrose, secretary; Bonnie Yan- 
char, vice president: Miff Yocum, president; Sue Ellen Johnson, treas- 
vrer. Row 2: Edith Barany, publicity chairman; Dianne Parker, social 
education chairman; Harriet Mosher, elections board; Marlene Yourga, 
Student Council representative; Marianne Tretinik, WRA representa- 
tive; Carole Kosher, ^ire chief; Pat McDonald, AWS representative; 



Pat Derus, social chairman: Cathie Cortese, food sennce chairman. 
Row 3: Karen Nelsen, Carol Cogan, Deanna Bertram, Maureen Fore- 
man, Pat Gonda, Carole Young, Linda Massey, Teddy Doleski, An- 
nette Ehrbar. Row ■/; Barbara Komyati. Pattie Pine, Carolyn Bell, 
Carol Currie, Brooke Harper, Donna Rigby, Linda Swinehart, Lynne 
Hoskins, Nancy Jane Peterson. 



210 




NIGHT OWL 

Last spurt for success. 




VIEWERS 

Saturday night W (ithout) B (oys). 





JUDY VAN EPPS AND TOM BALDWIN 

"But wasn't it 1-196?" 



MELANIE ROSE 

Reaching the height of anticipation. 




LINGUISTS 

It's often good to draw a blank. 



NON-PROFIT VENDER 

Distributing tlie delicacies of tlie "Hub." 




HIS AND HERS 

Relaxing from the tensions of school. 




CONCERNED READERS 

Knowing the news. 





Prentice Hall, Front row, 1-r: Marcie Barnett, Nancy Fiorino, Vicki 
Popa, Phyliss Kisiel, vice president; Geri Clement, president; Bar- 
bara Kietlanski, treasurer; Ruth Razem, secretary; Barbara Tome, 
Roberta Gross, Virginia Ceroky. Row 2: Judith Seufer, Joan Gui- 



singer, Jean Griffith, Penny Espelage, Janet Kellner, Camille Polanski, 
Judy Dunlap, Diane Borchik, Pat Keeter. Row 3: Maxine Miller, Joan 
Lube, Sharon Pike, Eileen Gautcher, Jean Bollardi, Janet Duda, Darlene 
Hoff, Shirley Heck, Linda Kiuiniemi, Carol Yurtin. 



Prentice Hall 



"Laboratory for Living" is the motto of Prentice Hall, 
residence of 372 women. And center of this lab is a 
dramatic aqua, purple and magenta lounge, favorite 
night-time studying place for residents. Opened in 1959, 
the dormitory is named for the University's first woman 
faculty member. Directed by counselor Barbara Coch- 
ran, Prentice attempts to provide the best surroundings 
for each coed's academic and social advancement. To 
this end, the hall sponsors a formal dance, mixers and 
"Prentice Post," hall newspaper. Service to the com- 
munity includes preparing a Thanksgiving basket for a 
needy family and aiding at social functions of Cleve- 
land Boys' Industrial School. 




SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR 

Announcing the long-awaited call. 



Verder Hall 




LAST SATURDAY'S FAVOR 

Laughing about the past. 



A crepe paper football hero in a giant rocking chair 
added another first-place trophy to Verder Hall's show- 
case this year. In addition to this "Rock the Rockets" 
display for the Kent vs. Toledo Homecoming game, 
Verder copped top honors for independent women in 
Campus Day float competition, Penny Carnival and 
Rowboat Regatta. The hall, named in honor of a for- 
mer dean of women, strives to provide an atmosphere 
conducive to both social and academic development for 
385 residents. Under the guidance of Mrs. Lucille 
Tritchler, counselor, Verder coeds combine their efforts 
in a 20-member chorus and the "Verder Highlites," hall 
newspaper. 



NEXT SATURDAY'S DATE 

Dreaming about the future. 





^Jm^mSUkhMMM 



Verder Hall, Front row, l-r: Sylvia Battaglia, Melodic Miller, food 
service representative: Marie ReBell, Kay Ann Naymik, Marianne 
Horvath, president; Jean Sitler, vice president; Doris Blavos, fire chief; 
Rita Koehler, Erica Adrian. Row 2: Judy Stewart, treasurer; Sandy 
Babinchak, Student Council representative; Jean Plucinski, publicity 



214 



chairman; Judy West, Phyllis Hcnkin, Marilyn Starin, secretary; Bon- 
nie Miller, elections committee chairman. Row 3: Judy Kennedy, Barb 
Basinski, Chris Jaskela, Carolyn Morrow, AWS Activities Board repre- 
sentative; Mary Ellen Logan, Marianne Uhrin, Cara Brunst, social 
chairman; June White, social education chairman. 



Stopher Hall, Front row, I-r: James Denes, parliamentarian; Tom 
Westling, Bill Deames, vire president; Steve Kirman, treasurer; Bob 
York, secretary; Mike Aicher, Ron Belak. Row 2: Rex Zirbes, gradu- 
ate counselor: Richard Androvic. Frank Borschel Jr., Frank Bushman, 
cultural chairman; Willard Miller, Bruce Meyers. Row 3: Gary Bitt- 



ner, Bill Cash, graduate counselor; Eric Moll, Hector Rodriguez, Wil- 
liam Nyerges, James Walsh, Tom Nero. Row 4: Gale Olrich, John 
Campana, Golden K representative; Arthur Howie, John Cordell, 
Charles Cole, social chairman; Paul Johnson, Vance Krites. 




QUIET HOURS WARNING 

Gerry DeLooze, Bill Guilliouma, George Ritz, et. al. hear Charley Cole. 



"First on campus and first on Campus Day" describes 
Stopher Hall. Not only was Stopher the first men's 
residence hall erected at Kent, but this year it was top 
winner in Campus Day competition with its "Royal 
Barge of Siam" float. Opened in 1948 as President Bow- 
man's second building project and named for a former 
registrar, Stopher is presently under the direction of 
counselor Dallas Bailey. Among the activities of the 
285 residents are a winter formal and a Popeye Party. 
They also co-sponsored a party for underprivileged chil- 
dren with Lowry and Moulton halls. Stopher took sec- 
ond place for its Homecoming display, "Flashes Strike 
'Em Down." 



Stopher Hall 



m t « t 



« i 



Johnson Hall, Front row, I-r: Lou Telerico, John Szwast, Jim Walker, 
Student Council representative; Steve Simon, treasurer; Donald Drou- 
hard, recording secretary; Pete Marvin, president; Bob Zaletel, vice 
president; Jerry Jevack, Paul Hofer, Ted Raponi. Row 2: Bill Pear- 
sail, graduate counselor; Jay Whitman, David Koch, Harvey Phillips, 



Thomas Romanin, judicial chairman; Chuck Potashnik, John Streppa, 
Mike Halstead, constitution committee chairman; Bill McNamara, 
Dean Stroh, Row 3: Clark Maloney, resident counselor; Phil Trout- 
man, Michael Lapides, Matthew Brown, Michael Kelley, Bob Good- 
man, Mike Fay, John Novak, Yaro Sojka, Jim Cebulski. 



Jolmson Hall 



Top honors in Field Day last spring went to Johnson 
Hall, sponsor of this athletic event for the men's resi- 
dences. Johnson's Field Day featured a shot-put contest 
where a 16-pound weight was held at arm's length until 
the holder's limb gave out. The dormitory, named 
"Stopher B" after its construction in 1956 and later re- 
named in honor of John T. Johnson, former dean and 
professor, sponsors a variety of social and intellectual 
activities throughout the year. In addition to a party 
for underprivileged children, Johnson recently spon- 
sored the film "Red China— Outlaw" on campus. The 
men of Johnson won praise from University officials 
for a special year-end edition of the "Johnson Journal," 
hall newspaper. Led by resident counselor Clarke Ma- 
loney, the hall aims to achieve an atmosphere that will, 
aid the development of male students. 




BODY BEAUTIFUL 

The beach, some sand, a kick and then? 



Olson Hall 



Hot sabakas, hot dogs Russian style, are on the bill of 
fare at Olson Hall's annual Hot Sabaka Hop. This in- 
formal eat-and-dance party, a hayride and mixers are 
included in the hall's social schedule. Named in honor 
of a former professor in the geography department, the 
dormitory was opened in 1961. Olson's 370 male resi- 
dents, known as the Rebels, instituted a campaign to 
increase school spirit last year and sent a cheering sec- 
tion to the football games. In keeping with their nick- 
name, the men publish a dormitory newspaper, the 
"Rebel Rouser." Olson is the only men's residence on 
campus to have a cafeteria-study hall which is controlled 
by a scholarship committee. To augment the study fa- 
cilities, the hall is currently purchasing books for a 
library. During the integration crisis at the University 
of Mississippi, the hall's cultural committee invited pro- 
fessors to speak on the situation. Directed by counselor 
Edwin Smith, the men of Olson cooperated with the 
students of Stopher Hall in sponsoring a Christmas 
party for underprivileged children. 




A HEFNER PROTEGE 

Waiting from the ISth to the ISth. 




Olson Hall, Front row, l-r: Terry Lequyea, Don Frost, treasurer; Rich 
Prokopius, vice president; Al Head, president; Bob McCullagh, secre- 
tary and Student Council representative; Ken Baron, sports chairman. 
Row 2: George Imber, fire marshall; Bruce Beebe, parliamentarian; 
Don Bernard, Jim Emerson, David Ray, Bill Hawkins, newspaper 



editor; Joseph Santera. Row 3: Ed Smith, advisor; Dan Norris, Jason 
Aronoff, Jack Sherwood, Ronald Zinz, Michael Schwartz. Row 4: Dale 
Landefeld, social committee chairman; Luke Lollini, scholarship 
committee chairman; Richard Woodruff, Richard Purdy, Ed Hibler, 
Ron Clark. 



officers. Front row, l-r: Robert Sivert, social chairman; 
Michael Riley, Lake Leader editor: Gerald Hannay, treas- 
urer. Row 2: Milton Rudy, cultural committee chairman; 
Jack Warren, secretary; Tom Kessler, graduate counselor. 
Row 3: Bob Lobel, James Bailey, resident counselor: Carl 
Hoffman, office manager. Row 4: Robert Dornbush, vice 
president; Jim Phelan, president; Ric Galberaith, coun- 
selor. 




Lake Hall 



A 22-day telephone conversation between Lake and 
Dunbar halls brought the world talkathon crown to 
Kent State last spring. To break 14-day and 21-day rec- 
ords set by Western Michigan University and California 
Polytechnical Institute respectively, a Lake man dropped 
a dime into one of the hall's pay phones and thus began 
a continuous period of gabbing with coeds in the wom- 
en's hall. Many boy-girl friendships were rung up be- 
tween phone partners who had signed up for half-hour 
stints of yakking. Lake Hall sponsors a variety of social 
activities that range from a western dance to a Christ- 
mas formal. Residents captured a first-place trophy for 
their Homecoming display and were second-place win- 
ners in the men's intramural football competition. The 
370 men aid underprivileged children and publish a 
newspaper, the "Lake Leader." 




Lake Hall, Front row, l-r: Randy Apel, Richard Aganko, Robert 
JoUeff, Jack Chmielewski, Jim LaCivita, Walt .Strickland, Teddy Szen- 
born, Don Williams. Harvey Parizman, Charles Supinski, Bill Felch, 
Donald Leedy. Row 2: William Miller, Arthur Doutt, Richard Mor- 
rall, Bill Wood, Frank Zell, Dick Tarulli, Ted Holt, Jim Blackburn, 
Don Niece, Jerry Harris, William Miller, Mike Carter. Row 3: Tom 



Busta, Dan Huston, Walter Noss. Robert Keller, Jim Michalske, Paul 
Paparone, Jim Stephan, Ed .Steigerwald, Keith Keller, Frank With- 
erow. Jay Bernhart, Al Sackman. Row 4: Ed Sonnichsen, Les Koh- 
mann, John Railing, Wayne Ollila, Lynn Parachek, Charles Arm- 
strong, Richard Barnes, John Coup, Tim Llewellyn, James Weaver. 



218 




Inter-Hall Council, Front row, l-r: Robert Dornbush, Ted Raponi, 
president; Don Bernard, secretary; Pete Marvin, cultural committee 
chairman. Row 2: John Pilutti, social chairman; James Phelon, schol- 



arship chairman; Robert Keller, Jim Cebulski, John Corsare, MSA 
representative. Row 3: Edwin Smith, Clark Maloney, advisor; James 
Bailey, Alfred Head, publicity chairman. 




MINGLERS 

Enjoying council's activities. 



Presidents' Round Table, a discussion meeting of stu- 
dent leaders with President Bowman, results from the 
initiative of Inter-Hall Council. The major function of 
the council is correlating the efforts of the four men's 
residence halls. It strives to provide a program of ac- 
tivities for men living on campus. With membership 
composed of the president and two representatives from 
Stopher, Johnson, Lake and Olson halls, the Council 
aids in creating an atmosphere conducive to scholarship 
throughout the men's dormitories. The group presented 
a Homecoming art show and, in cooperation with the 
women's residences, held dances throughout the year. 
The organization sponsors the Merrymen of Kent, glee 
club of men from the halls. 



Inter-Hall Council 





- i 


1 




hP^ 




In June, 1947, the first national Greek organization 
reached Kent's campus. Chi Omega sorority became 
the first of local social groups to take on national 
affiliation, followed by 26 others in succeeding years. 
The faculty expressed approval of this national as- 
sociation at a meeting in May of that year and Avas 
warmly supported in its opinion by President Bow- 
man, himself a Sigma Nu. Providing their members 
with a sense of identification and an opportunity for 
self-expression, the Greek-letter societies have become 
a potent force on campus. Sign of the integral role 
they play are plans for the purchase of a fraternity 
row, announced this year. Estimated cost of this 
seven-acre "dream row," adjacent to the campus, is 
1.5 million dollars. 



Greeks 




'r *': 



/;(,? 





READY SMILES 
Sorority life is a combination of laughter 





CONCENTRATION 

. moments of moods . 



Alpha Xi Delta 



A national organization on Kent's campus since 1947, 
Alpha Xi Delta Sorority has been active in all phases of 
collegiate life. The Xi's who wear the quill pin know 
that education is not just a book-learning process. They 
believe that athletics, social events and service to the 
community all contribute to the education of a college 
coed. Alpha Xi's showed their "muscle" by taking first 
place in the May Day Relays. The sorority contributes 
to Happy Day School, a local facility for the care and 
education of retarded children. In addition, it held a 
Founders' Day banquet, a spring Rose Formal, A Christ- 
mas party and a Memorial Day picnic. Despite Alpha 
Xi Delta's busy agenda, the girls placed first in scholar- 
ship among all sororities during the spring quarter. 




QUESTIONING EYES 

. . situations of inquiry . . 



SONG PRACTICE 

. . . centered around friendship. 



232 





Gail Frease, Pres. 
Susan Lucas, V. Pres. 
Rosalie Sciangula, Rec. Sec. 
Darleen Yeager, Corr. Sec. 
Janice Lewis, Treas. 
Carole Vezse, Hist. 



Helen J. Poulton, Housemother 

Janice Achenbach 

Paula Amato 

Judy Bassetti 

Karen Bendix 

Donna Benedetti 



Carol Billett 
Virginia Bunting 
JoAnn Callas 
Karen Coulter 
Tina Danko 
Margaret Daugherty 



Jacquelyn Fuller 
Carrie Gaston 
Gail Glanzer 
Joan Guisinger 
Diana Hazen 
Marlene Heppert 




Carolyn Jaegers 
Karen Jaegerson 
Carol Jenkins 
Polly Jones 
Elaine Kase 
Pat Keelore 



Janice Krupienski 
Patricia Mackil 
JoAnn Maskow 
Judy Michael 
Sondra Osborne 
Karen Peterson 



Carrie Portteus 
Catherine Rooney 
Caryl Shissler 
Diane Taddeo 
Sharon Tippett 
Hope Vara 



Alpha Xi Delta 



CASUAL ATMOSPHERE 

Conversation is spontaneous when 
"sisters" get together. 




AMUSED GROUP 

Although textbooks are not noted for laughs. 




>v** 




WELCOME 

Sorority's "rush" smile framed by "sister's" arm. 





Delta Zeta 



Philanthropic projects are an acclaimed sidelight of 
Delta Zeta sorority. The coeds furnished a "Delta Zeta" 
room in the Speech and Music Center for the training 
of preschool deaf children. At Christmas time the DZ's 
held a party for all third graders in the Kent area. Their 
admission ticket was a "nearly-new" toy. The toys were 
turned over to the Kent Welfare Association, who in 
turn distributed the gifts to underprivileged children. 
These deeds earned the Kent State chapter the first-place 
trophy for philanthropy at the Delta Zeta's national 
convention. In addition to their philanthropic projects 
the DZ's have time for social events. The "sisters" high- 
lighted an active year of teas, firesides and serenades 
with the annual Dream Girl Formal in the spring. In 
sorority competition Delta Zeta captured second place 
on Campus Day with its float, "Locks of Luck." Their 
rendition of "Happy Talk" from South Pacific won a 
third-place trophy in Songfest. 



SUBORDINATE KLAUSES 
It's about time someone gave him a piesent. 




Patricia Burgess, Pres. 
Patricia Grubbe, V. Pres. 
Corinne Roberts, Corr. Sec. 
Nancy Talbott, Rec. Sec. 
Marilyn Gilida, Treas. 
Suzanne Rodda, Hist. 



Darleen Niehaus, Housemother 

Louise Bailey 

Nancy Barkhurst 

Gretchen Bierbaum 

JoAnn Bronczek 

Joyce Burrell 



Linda Campbell 
Betsy Canfield 
Marion Capra 
Sherry Gallagher 
Mary Gibson 
Barbara Grimm 



Gail Gustin 
Janet Hall 
Katie Hammer 
Jonelle Kerr 
Barbara Kietlanski 
Linda Lenox 



223 



Anne Lyday 
Margaret Mairs 
Carole Maxwell 
Carol McClain 
Karen Mueller 
Sharon Patterson 



Penny Ptleger 
Sara Jane Powell 
Karen Rattan 
Lillian Reed 
Jan Reynolds 
Nancy Rickert 




Delta Zeta 



BIG AND LITTLE SISTERS 

Beginning both pledge period and warm friendship. 



226 






Carol Samstag 
Julie Snyder 
Karen Stone 
Marty Talbott 
Carolyn Tober 
Jean VanEtten 



Frances Warner 
Betty Jo Wollam 
Virginia Wyman 
Nancy Yentch 
Carole Young 
Elaine Zimmer 





QUIET CEREMONY 

Candle light reflecting a bright future. 



TROPHY HOLDERS 
DZ's display an impressive collection. 



Elaine Gorence, Pres. 
Ada Montagner. V. Pres. 
Linda Ramsev, Corr. Sec. 



Judy Brundic, Rec. Sec. 

MaryAnn Sila, Treas. 

Dorothy Logan, Housemother 




Chi Oraega 



First national sorority at Kent State was the 100th 
chapter of Chi Omega. The Chi O's, from their new 
house, a modern brick structure on Summit Street, 
join in all phases of University life. The 54 members 
have "sisters" in many of the women's honoraries, 
including Cardinal Key. Chi O's are active in Student 
Council, Angel Flight, Flasherettes and cheerleaders. 
Members also serve as ROTC sponsors and residence 
hall officers. As a service to the University the sorority 
offers a $25 social science prize and holds an all-Uni- 
versity tea. As a service to the community they sere- 
nade shut-ins at the old folks' home. In social affairs 
the sisters hold a spring formal and a Chi Omega- 
Fiji Street Dance. In campus competition the group 
won a second place in the May Day Relays and 
splashed their way to a second-place finish in Row- 
boat Regatta. 



SIGN BEARERS 
upholding the name of Chi Omega. 




TWEED RING 

Greeks tipJioId an English tradition. 




CHI O RAIDER 

Cauglit iL'liile liolding up llie ice box. 



22$ 





Dee Ambrose 
Barbara Ball 
Carol Beal 
Karen Beauregard 
Carol Bellan 
Cindy Buzzelli 



Elizabeth Conti 
Magdaline Conomos 
Carol Conkle 
Bunny Davenport 
Judith Evans 
Carolyn Ewing 



Barbara Fenley 
Kay Fletcher 
Patricia Forrest 
Jean Gallo 
Sandy Glover 
Marlene Grabill 



Nancy Gustafson 
Eileen Halter 
Mary Kazmaier 
Mary Less 
Diane MacGregor 
Pat Magalenga 



Lynne Marchiore 
Kathy Moran 
Joyce Morford 
Connie Nosan 
Marilyn Orr 
Judith Pettay 



Susan Pfoor 
Sandra Plues 
Ann Riley 
Dorothy Ser 
Louise Schmidt 
Diane Schroeder 



Janice Sperry 
Nancy Stanton 
Mona Storm 
Rosetta Traczynski 
Merrily Unger 
Barbara Wagner 



Marilyn Watts 
Donna Werner 
Carol Wood 
Nancy Woodrow 
Bonnie Yanchar 
Sharon Yoder 



Gamma Plii Beta 



INFORMAL MEETING 

rainstormins: anions, the sisters. 




Gamma Phi Beta is the only women's Greek organiza- 
tion on campus with the title "sorority". The seven 
other Kent "sororities" are officially chartered as fra- 
ternities in their constitutions. The women of Gamma 
Phi Beta work actively with brother Greeks. The chap- 
ter co-sponsored an all-University dance with Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon fraternity and coordinated activities with 
Sigma Phi Epsilon for the Annual May Day Relays. 
Fall quarter the sorority house was transformed into a 
Japanese palace for the yearly Sayonara Party. Later 
the girls turned their home from the islands of Japan 
into an isle of the Bahamas for a Bimini Party, complete 
with Hawaiian orchids. Another fall event was the 
sorority's Founders' Day banquet. With spring quarter 
came the spring formal and an outdoor barbecue. Greek 
life is not all party for the Gamma Phi's though. Na- 
tionally the sorority concentrated its interests on child 
welfare by sponsoring summer camping for under-priv- 
ileged children. StafEed by Gamma Phi's who volunteer 
their services, camps are maintained in Denver and 
Vancouver. 




Kathy Slagel, Pres. 

Josephine Pizer. V. Pres. 

Anne Lange, Corr, Sec. 

Kathleen King. Rcc. Sec. 

Karen Square, Treas. 

Margaret Salter, Housemother 



Tina Beauridge, Mascot 

Jane Allen 

Sandy Babinchak 

Carol Barrett 

Lilly Bergstrom 

Nancy Beutel 



Carole Bigler 

Diane Borchik 

Jane Cauvet 

Sandra Cole 

Phyllis Drasler 

Valerie Fitting 



Claire Gambatese 

Joyce Goodspeed 

Lillian Hacker 

Jan Hadley 

Nancy Hanna 

Barbara Irwin 




GAMMA PHI CHOIR GIRLS 



PATIENCE 

With only one phone. 






Beth Johnson 
Margaret Jones 
Linda Kines 
Kathleen Koval 
Ellen Ladd 
Gay Lucas 



Mary McHenry 
Mary Muesegaes 
Suzanne Murphy 
Lois Oliver 
Carolyn Pierce 
Georgia Profusek 



Jacqueline Purcell 
Linda Reynolds 
Nancy Roberts 
Mary Ann Rovtar 
Noreen Schaeter 
Joan Sheplin 



Phyllis Seifried 
Nancy Snively 
Barbara Spangenberger 
Rosemary Tokar 
Karen Tsaloff 
Barbara Valince 



Patricia Wasson 
Linda Wheller 
Juanita Wisniewski 
Loni Yutzey 
Frances Zilka 



Panhellenic trophy for first place in scholarship went 
to Alpha Gamma Delta during the past school year. 
Besides maintaining high scholastic standards the 
chapter members represented the sorority at all cam- 
pus competitions. The Alpha Gams won the All- 
Sports Trophy for 1961-62. Socially, the Alpha Gam 
top events were their winter and spring formals, an 
annual Christmas party at Mrs. Bowman's home and 
their annual hayride. Nationally, the sorority gave 
aid to cerebral palsy victims and a scholarship to 
physical therapists doing special work in that field. 
For the community the chapter sponsored a Christ- 
mas party for handicapped children at the University 
School. The "sisters" also worked with children at 
the Happy Day School. 




ALPH.\ GAMS' VIRTUOSO 

All tills, and after only a month of correspondence courses. 



Alpha Garama Delta 



CHESSMATES 

Joker joins the knights, kings and queens 




Harriet Posgay, Pres. 

Carol Schuller, V. Pres. 

Marilu Ransom, Corr. Sec. 

Carolyn Freas, Rec. Sec. 

Nina Ronshausen, Treas. 

DeAnne Albertson 



Rose Amma 
Darlene Baker 
Doris Blavos 
Joan Canon 
Barbara Elias 
Linda Gray 





^ Vv '^iJf- ^^ liL 




Carol Lutkus 
Karen Lloyd 
Jean Majick 
Gloria Miller 
Patricia Newdome 





Ellen Ragon 
Barbara Sper 
Susan Stonebaker 
Janet Thomas 
Janice Todor 
Linda Tomlinson 



Linda Tompkins 
Linda Traycotf 
Marsha Walters 
Nancy Wannamacher 
Grace Wilson 
Claire Wolfe 



Delta Gararaa 



Recipients of the sorority scholarship trophy for winter 
quarter were Delta Gamma members, the girls who 
wear the anchor pin. But the sorority is not only out- 
standing for scholarship; Delta Gamma's year-long phil- 
anthropic project is aiding the blind. "Sisters" volun- 
teer time to read to blind students and assist a blind 
couple. Members of the local chapter, founded in 1947, 
brought numerous honors to their sorority last year. The 
Alpha Tau Omega White Rose queenship, the Miss 
Kent State title and Sweetheart of Delta Sigma Phi hon- 
or went to Delta Gamma. Two "sisters" are listed in 
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities, two 
were tapped for Laurels and four belong to Cardinal 
Key. 



PLEDGES 

Pi Alpha chapter is decoratively growing 




Sally Simmons, Pres. 

Lela McCasIin, V. Pres. 

Judy Peate, Corr. Sec. 

Betty Harry, Rec. Sec. 

Julie Birch, Treas. 

Mildred Moses, Housemother 



Joan Bessick 

Pamela Brown 

Peggy Brownell 

Glenda Chisholm 

Cathleen Cortese 

Susan Dante 



Diane Evershed 

Connie Fisher 

Beverly Fox 

Ann Gibson 

Sue Hale 

Sandra Hanna 





Judith Harris 
Linda Hawkins 
Debbie Hemdel 
Joan Hildebrandt 
Carole Kaliden 
Diane Lapolla 



Eleanor Limongi 
Joanne Lininger 
Carol Mansfield 
Karen Marquardt 
Linda Massey 
Diane Mathews 



Elinor Metcalf 

Donna Miller 

Marybeth Miller 

Gail Paulus 

Eleanor Price 

Jacquie Ramella 



Marie ReBell 

Diane Rozanski 

Carolyn Schuenemann 

Virginia Suty 

Brenda Turlington 

Judith VanEpps 



Joan Varney 

Sandra West 

Holly Wilben 

Melody Wordsworth 

Mary Yocum 

Marlene Yourga 





EXAMPLES 

because of lovely recruiters . 



■DG" 

and an atmosphere of home. 



Cheryl Petraitis, Pres. 

Laurel ^Vebster, V. Pres. 

Judy Bond, Corr. Sec, 

Carol Ericson, Treas. 

Albana Dalzell. Housemother 

Marilyn DuBois, Advisor 



Angela Bazen 

Joyce Biddlestone 

Cara Brunst 

Jean Burke 

Rebecca Cole 

Geri Clement 



Helen Crouch 

Kay Donecker 

Linda Drullard 

Eunice Fox 

Noreen Gallatin 

Barbara Grills 




Norma Grills 

Nancy Harding 

Nancy Hyle 

Jacquelun Johns 

Nancy Kaiser 

Cynthia Keys 



Deanna Knight 

Mary Lander 

Maria Martini 

Jan McCIeary 

Pat McDonald 

Linda McGonigal 



Kathryn Mills 

Nancy Montgomery 

Karen Nelson 

Karen Novotny 

Barbara Pariso 

Antoinette Perkins 



Karen Reagan 
JoAnn Reynolds 
Donna Rigby 
Barbara Ross 
Patricia Rote 
Donna Schreiner 



Sheryl Secrest 

Nancy Stephan 

Barbara Tome 

Jane Van Almen 

June Wakefield 

Holly Wynn 





^"^ 





SQUABBLE 

Alpha Phi's version of Indian 




"PHI" GARO 

A score of activities provides entertainment. 




Alpha Phi 



APPROPRIATE PLACE 

Annual football game with DU's on Phi's lawn. 



Beta Omega chapter of Alpha Phi sorority has been a 
national chapter on the Kent Greek scene since 1948. 
The Phi's have taken awards in both scholastic and 
social events. They placed second in scholarship among 
sororities spring quarter. Annually the sorority co-spon- 
sors the All-Greek Formal at Myers Lake with the fra- 
ternity, Sigma Nu. Pledges of Alpha Phi are presented 
during the dance. In the spring the Phi's placed first in 
Songfest with their rendition of "Inch Worm," and cap- 
tured third place in Campus Day float competition with 
"Fogg's Folly." Alpha Phi has undertaken philanthropy 
projects: a Christmas party for underprivileged chil- 
dren, assistance at Akron Children's Home and donation 
of Easter favors to patients in Ravenna's hospital. Well- 
represented in queen contests, the Phi's had an attend- 
ant to the Campus Day queen and two attendants to the 
Rowboat Regatta queen. 




Sue Smith, Pres. 

Janet Kadowaki, V. Pres. 

Janet Sooy, Corr. Sec. 



Bonnie Salay, Rec, Sec. 
Nancy Perrine, Treas. 
Bettv Mittendorf, Hist. 




Alpha Chi Omega 










POSSIBLE DUMMIES 

Bridging the gap between weekends. 

Little All-Greek Queen, Phi Kappa Theta Sweater Hop 
Queen and Phi Kappa Tau Playmate were individual 
honors of Alpha Chi Omega members last year. Since 
its institution as a national sorority in 1950, the chapter 
has originated many unique social events. A Christmas 
formal, staged in the newly-decorated sorority house, 
gave the sisters an opportunity to present their dates 
with stockings filled with "unusual" surprises. O.C.A. 
(Alpha Chi Omega) Day was a turnabout event for 
sorority pledges as they assumed the role of actives for 
a day. But the sorority's life is not all social. Alpha Chi 
Omega aided the Speech Clinic and assisted cerebral 
palsied children. 



Helen Lewis, Housemother 
Beth Anient 
Diana Astbury 
Nancy Bierwirth 
Barbara Bischoff 



Aileen Braun 
Marianne Brown 
Jolene Bulkowski 
Carolyn Canning 
Linda Cironi 



Ruth Cline 
Linda Cooper 
Martha Dauber 
Nancy Edman 
Helen Eshlcn 



Carol Evans 
Jane Fancher 
Mary Girsch 
Kay Hotchkiss 
Susan Hill 





Joyce Ingham 
Margaret Johnson 
Sara Keller 
Carol Krispinsky 
Karen Kozuh 
Linda LaMarca 



Gretchen Letzelter 
Barbara Libby 
Wanda Linerode 
Joanne Montgomery 
Terri Morgan 
Gayle Morrow 



Maria Pucci 
Beverly Robertson 
Patricia Roof 
Norma Russell 
Karen Savinsky 
Linda Shearer 



Dianne Sikorski 
Mary Simmons 
Patricia Sites 
Bonnie Smith 
Rose Trbovich 
Susan Walsh 



Lynn Waugh 
Marlene Weirick 
Joyce Widenor 
Joyce Ziegler 
Judith Ziegler 



TEMPTING SUITERS 

No over-exertion for mermaids. 



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Delta Upsilon 



CONVERSATIONALISTS 

DU kitchen provides stimulating atmosphere. 





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Originating in 1922 as Kappa Mu Kappa local frater- 
nity, Delta Upsilon became Kent's first national social 
fraternity in 1949. The chapter has had unequalled 
success in interfraternity athletics. It won the All-Sports 
Trophy for having accumulated the most points in com- 
petition. A first place in football, basketball and ping- 
pong and a second place in bowling were responsible for 
the championship. In other areas the DU's placed third 
in Songfest, and their humorous skit in Pork Barrel 
merited the runner-up position. The efforts of the 
"brothers" are not all directed towards activities of a 
social nature, however. Each quarter the fraternity and 
its pledges turn their attention to some local civic proj- 
ect in order that a favorable view of the fraternity sys- 
tem might be presented to the community. A large 
number of DU's were also active within the councils 
and honoraries on campus. 





APPRENTICESHIP 

Learning a trade while keeping the house together. 



INVOLVEMENT 

Hoping to briu!^ up the house average. 



Jeffrey King, Pres. 

James Vargo, V. Pres. 

James Buddie, Corr. Sec. 

William Lloyd, Rec. Sec. 

Richard Mehl, Treas. 

David Baldwin, Counselor 



Janet Young, Housemother 

Foster Armstrong, Advisor 

Phillip Shriver, Advisor 

Jon Baldwin 

Chuck Bennett 

Al Berry 



Peter Bickel 

Lawrence Biltz 

David Brown 

John Brown 

Frank Cain 

Anthony Chitea 







I U4 




^^^^ 



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240 




Ronald Clark 
Richard Cook 
Thomas Daramus 
Paul Deimling 
Donald Discenzo 
Roy Dunckel 



James Emerson 
Jack Fabri 
Allen Farinacci 
Manuel Fernandez 
Tim Flood 
Kenneth Gainar 



William Gelatka 
Ole Gilbo 
Robert Goodman 
Daniel Guest 
James Hutton 
Tom Johannl 



Robert Jolli£f 
Michael Joyce 
James Julian 
Thomas Kikendall 
Kenneth LaVergne 
Roger Magill 



Richard Markovic 
Thomas Maslyk 
Thomas Moir 
Terrence Moran 
Edward Musbach 
Randall Obst 



Dennis Parsons 
John Perrine 
James Radovic 
Ted Root 
Theodore Sabo 
William Steiner 



Robert Taylor 
Kent Taylor 
Robert Thomas 
Jeffry Toperzer 
Aubert Valentine 
Robert Vanek 



Kappa Alpha Psi 




The nation's first Negro Greek-letter fraternity, Kappa 
Alpha Psi, came to Kent State in 1952. Strong nation- 
ally, with some 22,000 members, the fraternity has as its 
fundamental purpose, achievement. With this goal in 
mind, the "brothers" of Kappa Alpha Psi compete ac- 
tively within Kent's fraternity system in both scholar- 
ship and athletics. During spring quarter intramurals 
the Kappas ran their way to three track victories. The 
chapter held the number-two position among fraterni- 
ties in grade averages last fall. 



HORSEPLAY 



Cutting up . . . 


HOUSE TALK 
. . . and talking it over are all part 


of fraternity life. 


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Harold Stubbs, Pres. 

Hilton Murray, V. Pres. 

Reggie Blue, Sec. 

Homer Hawkins, Treas. 

Clyde Allen 



Robert Billingslea 
William Brown 



Clyde Elba 

Ernest Fields 

Barry Grier 



William King 

Samuel McCall 

Alfred Tate 

Lowell Williams 




a99 






Al Head, Pres. 
Robert Harrison, V. Pres. 
Clarence Warfield, Treas. 
Samuel Hopkins 
Harvey Hunt 



Earl McNeal 
Monroe Peeler 



Recent addition to the University's Greek sys- 
tem is Alpha Phi Alpha. Along with a well- 
rounded social program, the fraternity promoted 
service to the community. Alpha Phi Alpha has 
assisted in the "Books for Asia" drive, and the 
chapter participated in panel discussions in va- 
rious high schools to inform graduating seniors 
about Greek life. The brothers of Alpha Phi 
Alpha emphasize scholarship and ranked high 
among fraternity groups in grade ratings. A 
Founders' Day formal highlighted the chapter's 
social events. 



Alpha Phi Alpha 



SKILLFUL 
Twisting them without breaking them is a talent . . . 




Sf*^*-^ 



HANGER 

, observed by a dubious brother. 









Ronald Venezia, Pres. 
John Sweeney. V. Pres. 
Frank Aguila, Rec. Sec. 



Ronald Sleeper, Treas. 
Bonnie Denzer, Housemothei 
Donald Schnller. ."Advisor 



Sigixia Nu 



Founded and built upon the "honor of man," Sigma 
Nu has attempted to sustain this feeling in its social, 
athletic, service and academic functions. With their 
sister sorority. Alpha Phi, the "brothers" decorated 
the front campus for the Christmas holidays and co- 
sponsored the annual All-Greek Formal at Myers 
Lake where the pledges of Alpha Phi were serenaded 
by the men of Sigma Nu. Members held at least one 
house party each week during the year. The frater- 
nity provided an added attraction for campus Greeks 
when the school year began with a party at their 
house topped off by a police-escorted caravan through 
the downtown area. The chapter completed its so- 
cial calendar with the annual White Rose Formal in 
the spring. Sigma Nu won the annual tug-of-war 
contest at Rowboat Regatta last spring. 




GROUNDSKEEPER 

Some pledges can take it easy 



WINDOW-WASHER 

. . . while others have to "stretch" to please actives. 








L-1 



tf^li2^^Jak 





Larry Ahem 
William Anderson 
Je£f Andrew 
William Banser 
Donald Beal 
Robert Bennett 



Raymond Bocci 
Rand Boston 
Billy Bowles 
Robert Burns 
Hank Cernigoj 
William Cetto 



Charles Cianciolo 
Larry DelBane 
Lewis DeWeese 
Walter Felt 
Richard Godfrey 
Kenneth Gozur 



Byron Giltz 
Robert Gusbar 
Willard Hesselburt 
Pete Hronek 
Major Jackson 
James Kaserman 



Gilbert Kelling 

Thomas Korab 

Phillip Kostelnik 

Richard Kridler 

Ron Kubicek 

Gerald Kuchenbrod 



Denis Kuhlke 

George Landis 

Donald Lippert 

Frank Lukuch 

Peter Palusci 

James P£ingsten 



James Phalen 

Lowell Starner 

William VonGunten 

William Walworth 

David Willey 

Richard Wolf 



Jack Wright 

John Yochim 

Arthur Youngblood 










Michael Kohn, Pres. 
Lawrence Mesnick, V. Pres. 
Laurence Coe, Sec. 
Leonard Stern, Treas. 
Robert Benjamin 
Sheldon Brodsky 



Barry Epstein 
Steven Feinberg 
Sanford Flack 
David Friedel 
Sanford Gilbert 
Melvin Ginsberg 



Alpha Epsilon Pi 



Remodeling is getting to be a habit with Alpha Epsilon 
Pi fraternity. Last year the group completely refurbished 
the interior of its house on Lincoln Street, and this year 
it plans exterior renovation with aluminum siding. Dis- 
playing other domestic qualities, fraternity members in- 
vite a Kent professor to dinner at their house each week. 
The "brothers" of Alpha Epsilon Pi also keep active 
during the year with a variety of social events. High- 
lighting the social calendar this year was their annual 
train ride party. Members and dates chartered a train 
car from Kent to Youngstown, hired a band and danced 
in the Youngstown depot. This year's party had a wild 
West theme. AEPI also participates in intramural sports, 
Pork Barrel and Penny Carnival. Last summer the fra- 
ternity sent representatives to its national convention in 
Atlanta, Georgia. The organization was founded at New 
York University in 1913 and in 1949 was the third local 
fraternity on Kent's campus to gain national status. 







"» '^'^ »^-^T) 



Barry Hasson 
Jerry Kliot 
Michael Lapides 
Robert Marx 
Lee Nelson 
Milton Pasternak 



Lawrence Rose 
Irwin Shulman 
Arthur Stoler 
Arnold Topp 
Robert Turk 
Norman Union 




MANUAL LABORERS 

Helping at the house is sometimes compulsory. 



CONTENTMENT 

Reflection of AEPI's easy fraternity living. 





ELECTRIC SHAVERS 



Phi Kappa Tau 



Located for ten years on Main Street, Phi Kappa Tau 
plans to make its new home on South Willow this 
spring. The local chapter was established at Kent in 
1949. Phi Kappa Tau was well-represented within the 
campus system last year by its members. Phi Tau's held 
executive positions in Interfraternity Council and the 
Men's Student Association. Active in the fraternity in- 
tramural program, the group won trophies in softball 
and ping-pong. The fraternity's social events included 
a spring formal and a Hawaiian party. The selection 
of a Phi Tau Playmate was the climax of the Playboy 
Party in the fall. The local group sent representatives to 
the Phi Kappa Tau national convention in North Caro- 
lina last summer. 



Dennis Ramey, Pics 

Ronald Gawryszewski, V. Pres. 

Lance Meneghclli, Corr. Sec. 

Philip Bethea. Rec. Sec, 

Lawrence Zier, Treas. 

lona Rauber, Housemother 



Bella, Mascot 

James Angle 

John Blair 

Duard Bradshaw 

Joseph Briese 

Paul Broer 



James Bryan 

David Carr 

Larry Chojnowski 

John Curtin 

Michael Daniels 

Larry Davis 








CARD SHARKS 

Hand is quicker than the eye. 




PORK BARREL 

Photographer had no trouble shooting this picture. 




m 





OIL'\L OBSERVATION 

Not much coming— just another refill. 



Jim Eismon 
David Elia 



John Flood 
Jeffrey Hathaway 
Brian Heberling 
Hal Hilson 



John Hook 
James Hultin 
Joseph Lasinis 
William Levant 
Luke Lollini 
Robert MacClaren 



Arthur McVey 

Edward Milanich 

Joseph Paquelet 

Stanley Plocica 

David Renninger 

John Sadler 



Donald Saye 

Ted Scoville 

Anthony Segura 

Neil Sharp 

Joseph Sherry 

Randy Thomas 






^^J^k£^ 






John Doslak, Pres. 
John Shalaty. V. Pres. 
Patrick Flaherty. Sec. 
Robert Cygan, Treas. 



Hazel Sessions, Housemother 
Frank Borally 
John Brinzo 
Joseph Casagrande 



Phi Kappa Theta 



Carl Christopher 'IJE* 

George Cody 



Carl Craine 
John Czar 



Lee Fiedler 
Robert Ficzner 



Gary Ganim 
Richard Hamad 



James Jeffries 
John Knight 



Richard Lasby 
David Macko 




James McGrath 

Richard Meek 

Joe Medve 

Tracy Payne 

LeRoy Pintar 

Edward Porowski 



Frank Romano 

Kenneth Reddinger 

Norman Resko 

Ronald Stesiak 

Kenneth Tarantino 

Paul Yates 




CULINARY MISHAP 

"Thumbs up" still goes for cooking for yourself. 



Phi Kappa Theta, national Catholic social fraternity, 
began the school year with its annual Phi Kap-Newman 
Club party where incoming freshmen had an oppor- 
tunity to meet members of these two Catholic organiza- 
tions. The fraternity's social calendar was filled with a 
variety of events. At its traditional Roman party the 
chapter's large gabled home on West Main was trans- 
formed with pre-Christian era decor for a night of rev- 
elry. A Christmas party highlighted fall quarter events. 
With winter came the annual sleigh ride. The Phi 
Kappa Theta Sweater Hop with its queen and a winter 
formal were other cold weather events. The Phi Kaps 
won first place in Rowboat Regatta and tied for first 
place in the May Day Relays. The group's Gold Cup 
Formal brought the schedule of activities to a close in 
the spring quarter. 




DEMONSTRATION 
The skillful art of self-defense. 




SUCCESSFUL PUTT 

As seen through a glass. 




INFORMAL MIXER 

Some seem content i/i just u'atchin{ 



'^^■.^^ 



% 




REMAINS 

Delts don't drink; they luwe stock in "dixie 



K.\ 



:..■:. •■■^ 




k 



Robert Blumel, Pres. 

James Shupe, V. Pres. 

Al Silvidi, Rec. Sec. 

Alan Auble, Corr. Sec. 

Edward Swanson, Treas. 

Gcorgianna Weisenbach, Housemother 



Ali Amir-Parviz 

Thomas O'Donnell 

Paul Carpenter 

Noel Chamberlain 

Blair Cook 

Edward Curry 






M^Hi 

"If 



Thomas Davidson 
David Durst 
David Foreman 
Jack Fristoe 
Paul Grandin 
Jerry Kalb 



Richard Katz 
Robert Kellogg 
Charles Kimball 
Jack Kloss 
James Lann 
David McCrory 





Atbiki^M 



,'i5» «? 





^ *«■ 



tm^mdm£} 




Robert McMahon 
Carl Nothhaft 
William Oliver 
Dennis Peterson 
Richard Pfeiffer 
William Pirtle 



Edward Purser 
Jeffrey Renkenberger 
David Russell 
Thomas Schaefer 
Dennis Sefert 
Dave Stillson 



Richard Stillson 
Richard Vilem 
Robert Voorhees 
Donald Woodcock 
Robert Young 



Within a tightly knit brotherhood members of Delta 
Tau Delta strive for the attainment of goals beneficial 
to both the fraternity way of life and to non-Greek stu- 
dents. The Delts have a status of being campus poli- 
ticians and businessmen. Delts may be found among 
the managing personnel of The Chestnut Burr, the Daily 
Kent Stater and Interfraternity Council. A majority of 
the chapter assisted in the New Student Program, orient- 
ing incoming freshmen. Delta Tau Delta has been an 
active participant in interfraternity sports. Also in the 
area of athletics, the chapter hosted a state-wide basket- 
ball tournament which it initiated. The tournament 
comprised all of the Delt houses in the state. 



Delta Tau Delta 




THE BRIDGE SET 

Kimball appears vulnerable as he wails for the dinner bell. 




Plii Sigma Kappa 



^r 



FRATERNITY'S PRIDE 

The one in the middle. 




HOLDING THE PHONE 

Often leads to holding the ba 





PRACTICE SESSION 

Txuo going dozL'ji, ay^d txi'o gone. 





Tops in interfraternity scholarship during four of the last five years was 
Phi Sigma Kappa. The Phi Sigs, while holding a high grade average, 
sponsored many novel theme parties during the year including a Roman 
party and a Monte Carlo party. The brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa, 
known for their red hearse, won many honors during the 1962-63 year. 
From the national chapter the fraternity received both a Manpower 
Award and a Scholarship Award, and the group was praised by the 
Kent Junior Chamber of Commerce for assisting in the JC's carnival. 
The Phi Sigs' Homecoming display earned a third-place trophy. 



James Jaccaud, Pres. 

Roy Wilson, V. Pres. 

Myron Mohr, Sec. 



Earl Belden, Treas. 

Revenna Murphy, Housemother 

H. F. Raup, Advisor 





mmmmmi 



C. Joseph Barnette 
Forest Baughman 
Douglas Brewer 
John Drage 
Thomas Forestal 



Harry Gill 
Ted Holz 
Robert Jones 
Ronald Krivec 
James Luse 



Thomas Luxmore 
Carroll Monteith 
William Munroe 
Thomas Schofer 
James Shelly 



Paul Stone 
Neil Wilson 
Robert Wilson 
Jim Yurchison 




"HOOTIN' ANNY" 
A few even listetied. 



Kappa Sigma 



Begun in 1932 as a local group, Kappa Sigma 
Chi, Kappa Sigma went national in 1950. The 
24 members maintained an active interest in 
social affairs last year. Highlight of an agenda 
of parties was a spring formal, the Stardust Ball. 
Other fetes were a casino party, night club 
party, beatnik party and the annual street dance 
in front of their house on University Drive. The 
Kappa Sig's participate annually in the "Books 
for Asia" drive. The fraternity has continually 
been above the campus all-men's grade average. 
In the spring quarter the group ranked sixth 
scholastically among all fraternities. 



AFTERMATH 

Next step, under the table. 




DOMESTICS 

Sovie day, they'll make good husbands. 




\ 





4Tfeikife4ili 





i^^tnAlk 



Kenneth McArtor, Pres. 
John Sutter, V. Pres. 
John Spotts, Sec. 
Thomas Wilbur, Treas. 
Gladys Oberlin, Housemother 



David Bender 
Frank Boffa 
Gabor Brachna 
Roger Brownson 
Gary Carnicom 




TRACY FAN 

This tueek's "crime 




John Drullard 
Karl Hutchison 
Len Kolopajlo 
Tom Mattis 
William Miller 



Walter Palechka 
Thomas Peets 
Thomas Saddler 
Dean Saunders 




Alpha Tau Omega 



Turning "Hell" Week into "Help" Week earned the 
praises of Kent community officials for Alpha Tau Omega 
fraternity. The fraternity directed the actions of its win- 
ter pledge class toward a city service project. Along with 
community honors, the ATO's have also won campus hon- 
ors. The ATO Campus Day float, "An Adventure Comes 
to Life," was judged best in its class. The ATO Homecom- 
ing house display also gained a first-place trophy. The 
fraternity has many outstanding members. An ATO was 
Apollo for Greek Week, and "brothers" participated on 
varsity athletic teams. The selection of a queen from new 
sorority pledges at its White Tea Rose Ball topped the 
chapter's social events. 




George Jenkins, Pres. 

David Zac, V. Pres. 

Mark Smith, Sec. 

Dennis Howell, Treas. 

Ruth Schott, Housemother 

Thomas Hansmeier, Advisor 



Emil Berg, Advisor 

Robert Bader 

Gerald Barilla 

Daryl Bateman 

Robert Bates 

Thomas Battenberg 



John Bucey 

William Charvat 

John Climaco 

Arthur Connell 

Joseph D'Aurora 

Edward DeVille 





Dan Dixon 
Don Donay 
Don Earnest 
Richard Evans 
Samuel Gibson 
Louis Gilbert 



James Glavic 
Glen Gress 
Jack Hackenson 
George Harris 
Thomas Heinz 
John Hoover 



David Jones 
Dennis Kempt 
Nick Kukul 
Newell Landphair 
Ryon Lautenschleger 
William Lee 




David Lima 
Ronald Mandolin 
John Marceca 
William Martin 
Richard McKenzie 
John Mead 



William Michaels 
Leonard Mostello 
Phillip Munger 
Raymond Niedzialek 
Wally Nimlowycz 
Ralph Oates 



Tony Pahls 
Nicholas Panagopoulos 
Roger Pettibone 
Robert Pike 
Arthur Roth 
John Sayers 



James Scotchie 
James Sturznickel 
Ronald Swartz 
Richard Welsh 



Sigma Phi Epsilon 



Packing crates and a moving van signaled the start of 
the school year for Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. Fall 
quarter the Sig Eps moved their "house with the heart," 
so called because of the fraternity's heart emblem, from 
Summit Street to N. Lincoln. The local chapter actively 
participates in the functions of its national organization. 
Last summer it was host to a leadership seminar for Sig 
Eps from the Northeastern United States. The "broth- 
ers" also contributed to the national fund for the fra- 
ternity's children's camp in the Adirondack Mountains. 
Locally, the group took second place for its pie throw- 
ing booth at Penny Carnival last spring. Annual fra- 
ternity social activities include a playboy party, a roar- 
ing twenties party and a spring formal. 






£kM 




7M 



David Madge, Pres. 
Robert Kracker, V. Pres. 
Allan Stinson, Rec. Sec. 
Edwin Moore, Corr. Sec. 



Don Means, Treas. 
MoUie Woodruff, Housemother 
Maurice Palmer, Advisor 
Mai Ling, Mascot 



i f 





?^ii'V^ 



GRABNER 

Hoping she's not what his "brother" has. 



SPIER 

Although, his brother seems to be satisfied. 



John Allensworth 

Thomas Brandt 

James Browne 

Clayton Campbell 

Dannie Craycraft 

David Gulp 



Donald Davis 
Richard Dunnick 
Warren Grabner 

Donald Gray 
John Haley 

Leon Hodkey 





Donald Merchant 
James Miller 
Robin Peck 
Robert Pitcher 
James Reed 
David Rynearson 



Donald Sambrook 
Carl Spier 
Garry Takacs 
Titus Techera 
Steve Weber 



William Wendell, Pres. 

Wayne Creamer, V. Pres. 

Theron Weeks, Sec. 

Thomas Kracker, Treas. 

Orrin Marwusch, Hist. 

Raymond Anderson 



James Andrews 

James Carl 

Robert Balson 

Charles Brown 

Max Calland 

Robert Denniston 




Theta Chi 



With its members pooling their efforts, 
Theta Chi has copped first place tro- 
phies in Pork Barrel for the past five 
years. And for scholarship the group has 
received an award every year since 1956. 
Annual Theta Chi social events include 
a monster party, luau party and spring 
formal. Last year the group's "Dream 
Girl," selected at this formal, was run- 
ner-up in a judging at the Theta Chi 
state convention. The group is active 
in Student Council and Interfraternity 
Council. 




INSPECTION 

Wondering irlictlifr fjiianl>l\' is an appropriate 
subslitule for quality. 



DISTRACTING DECOR 

decorations capture "brother's" attention. 







a^^^ 



Stephen Diser 
Michael Donnelly 
James DuBro 
Herbert Eisenhut 
Milton Ensinger 
David Everson 



Charles Fagert 
Tom Featheringham 
Mark Freeman 
Richard Golenski 
Charles Henderson 
Pete Hollish 



Floyd Jackson 
Charles Jones 
Kent Keller 
James Kleinfeld 
Terry Kleinfeld 
Michael Kraft 



Robert Lease 
Stephen Ledger 
Joseph Lewandowski 
Jack Lilie 
Richard Loughry 
James Malone 



Daniel Mantsch 
Jack Miller 
William Miller 
John Minor 
William Moorhead 
Lawrence Pence 



John Petel 
John Petrunia 
David Ramsey 
Gary Rhiel 
Garry Robinson 
Richard Robinson 



Gerald Semon 
John Streppa 
Robert Swinehart 
Terry Urban 
William Wakelee 
Bruce Walker 



Spencer Zinner 
Francis Zuppan 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon mixes mourning with gaiety. For their annual 
Patti Murphy party fraternity members transform a mock funeral into 
a night of fun. Doing a take-ofE on an Irish wake, the SAE's choose a 
"brother" to be Patti Murphy and revel his "passing on" as their top 
spring quarter social event. But the SAE's are not imique only because 
of this social activity. They have distinguished themselves with top 
honors in many all-University events. In last spring's Campus Day the 
fraternity won a first place in Songfest and a third place in float com- 
petition. For their ball toss booth, the "brothers" took a first prize in 
Penny Carnival during Mothers Weekend. Members earned a second 
place in fraternity intramural sports. The organization is also active in 
community and national projects. As part of service to the city of Kent 
SAE recently painted the downtown comfort station. Members, par- 
ticipating in a program of the national organization, sent representatives 
to its national leadership school in Evanston, Illinois last summer. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon was founded at the University of Alabama in 1856. 



MONEY-RAISING REVENGE 

SAE Penny Carnival booth gives students a 
chance to release aggressions. 




Donald Moore, Pres. 

David Norris, V. Pres. 

James Rucker, Corr. Sec. 

Alan Johnson, Rec. Sec. 

John Wertheim. Treas 

Julie Pfleger, Housemother 



Etta Siegrist, Cook 

Tony, Mascot 

Dennis Arnold 

Jeffrey Ash ton 

Robert Babiak 

Corey Bailey 



George Bartelme 

Nick Benyo 

Thomas Borden 

Daniel Buckey 

Ronald Centa 

Russ Chambers 













Pete Christ 
Lee Crawford 
Thomas Crawford 
Gerald Damerow 
Jack Forshey 
Paul Fleischer 



James Florian 
Eugene Gilmore 
Larry Ginnegaw 
John Gruitza 
Roger Ishee 
Allyn Kain 



Michael Kennedy 
Richard Kricger 
Herman Lamers 
Peter Lawson 
Daniel Lavelle 
John Lee 



Roger Marty 

David Meyer 

Paul Miller 

Dave Moshier 

Curran Murphy 

Robert Nelson 



Thomas Peetz 

David Powell 

Max Powrie 

Richard Schooley 

Larry Shaffer 

Timothy Shapiro 





Joseph Snayd 
Donald Stewart 
James Taylor 
Louis Telerico 
Jan Thoma 
Robert Thomas 



Joeseph Thompson 
Laurence Thrasher 
David Todt 
Charles Waldron 
James Walters 
Fred Whitney 



Thomas Zercher 



4%^tk 



Collegiates 




LEISURE TIME 

Mosaic makes attractive background for injorinal moment. 




TWISTIN' TIME 

Background here is Collegiate party. 



Kent's only local independent fraternity, the Collegiates, 
were continual contenders for intramural championships. 
This year the group captured the fraternity bowling 
crown. Inculcating the spirit of fraternal independence 
while promoting the idea of "The man first, the student 
second, and the Collegiate third," the men have shown 
their concern for others by sponsoring a foster child in 
Viet Nam. The Collegiates received a scholastic trophy for 
spring quarter. An annual Roman party, a gambling party 
and a spring formal were on the Collegiate social card. 



William Phillips. Pres. 
Dale Boll, V. Pres. 



Ralph Gordon, Sec. 
Sydney Richards, Treas. 



Grace Simmons, Housemother 

Charles Soltis, Advisor apk 







^^^^k 








liAiktfi 




Klaus Bauer 
John Carey 
Michael Cummings 
Lawrence Graham 
Michel Hopkins 



Andrew Kotwis 
Edward Leanza 
Robert Lesko 
Joseph Martin 
Patrick Maurer 




John Stulak 
Edward Szalkowski 
Gary Warner 
Roy Weimert 



Phi Delta Theta 



REVERSE SITUATION 

Entertaining four brothers. 






Mock pledgings, house duties and Greek pins are "hon- 
ors" for sweethearts of Phi Delta Theta during the fra- 
ternity's annual She-Delt Week. A national Phi Delt 
activity, She-Delt Week shows the girlfriends of "broth- 
ers" the fraternity way of life. For seven days the girls 
go through a mock hell week and perform the usual 
duties of Greek pledges. But after the period of house- 
cleaning and observing fraternity rules, the girls are 
honored at a dance, highlight of the week's activities. 
Another nationwide Phi Delt activity is Community 
Service Day, when each fraternity chapter plans im- 
provement projects in its home city. The local chapter 
recently renovated a Girl Scout camp and cleaned 
streets of Kent as its part in the day of service. In addi- 
tion, the fraternity also sent representatives to its na- 
tional convention in Bedford Springs, Pennsylvania, last 
summer. Added to these national activities in the Phi 
Delt program are the all-Greek events at Kent. The 
fraternity rated tops scholastically fall quarter and was 
second in grade averages last spring. In intramural 
competition, members were second-place winners in vol- 
leyball and placed in football competition. The lo- 
cal chapter was founded in 1954 and is one of the six 
Greek organizations on campus that bought land for 
the fraternity row soon to go under construction near 
University School. 



REFRESHING PAUSE 

"How does it taste straight? 





iltli^tk^ 



Aia^saJt^Aiki 






James Hoobler 



Brian Jennings 



William Hoffman, Pres. 
William Beals, V. Pres. 
Robert Barres, Sec. 
Howard Pfeuffer, Treas. 
Steven Schick, Hist. 
Marie Johnson, Housemother 



Charles Barnhouse 
Richard Barton 
John Bezdek 
James Butler 
William Chambers 
Jim Clark 



James Colligan 
Donald Daley 
Douglas Daley 
Ron Emch 
Emil Hasenstab 
William Havas 




^ FACULTY SUPERVISION 

Making sure that no one gets out of hand. 








James Klecka 
Michael Lampe 
Christopher Larick 
Carl Lytle 
Terry Malish 
Robert Mather 



Bruce Mcintosh 
James Meal 
William Meissner 
David Noonan 
James Oberdorfer 
Dave Peterson 



Donald Richeson 
Theodore Sidaway 
Thomas Smith 
Thomas Tanski 
Nick Telemachos 
Larry Vermillion 



HOST AND GUEST 
Fraternity's good-will ambassador. 




Phi Gamma Delta 



Thomas Nighswander, Pres. 
Doug McNeil, Rec. Sec. 



Jack Sarsen, Corr. Sec. 

Tom Wilkins, Treas. 

Allen Rumbaugh, Hist. 

Alma Knight. Housemother 

Karl Auchenbaugh 

Thomas Baldwin 



Jeff Berg 

Chip Bjerke 

Roger BoUen 

Gary Burnett 

Bob Clark 

Michael Erdos 



James Fuedner 

Rob Graven 

James Green 

David Guy 

Larry Hannam 

Michael Jones 



Local chapter of Phi Gamma Delta gained prominence 
this year with the election of its faculty advisor to a 
national fraternity post. Faculty advisor Louis Man- 
gels, director of student activities at Kent, was chosen 
as Phi Gamma Delta section chief last January. In this 
office Mangels has charge of fraternity affairs at Michi- 
gan, Michigan State, Western Reserve and Kent univer- 
sities. But an outstanding advisor is not Phi Gamma 
Delta's only claim to fame. Fraternity members, known 
on campus as the Fijis, won second-place honors in 
Campus Day competition and intramurals. A Songfest 
trophy winner was the Fiji rendition of Eddystone Light, 
while a "bigger than life" model of Jules Verne's Phin- 
eus Fogg brought an award in the Campus Day float 
contest. The fraternity also took a second place in swim- 
ming competition among the Greeks. Phi Gamma Delta 
was founded at Jefferson College in 1848, and the local 
chapter gained national status in 1960. Each year the 
Kent group holds the traditional Fiji Island Party as 
its top social event. 




270 




FOOTWARMING 

At house-warming. 



Daniel Kenney 
Robert Lobel 
David Miller 




Richard Murphy 
Bud Nester 
Richard Pizzuti 
Niel Price 
Vic Reed 
Robert Rubins 



Richard Selong 
Bruce Shaw 
Richard Timko 
Thomas Vassallo 
James White 
Tuck Woodward 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



The Colony of Tau Kappa Epsilon has been a member 
of Kent's fraternity system since 1959 when the group 
gained colony status from Interfraternity Council. The 
main goal of the colony's 31 men is to become charter 
members of the largest national social fraternity, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon. The colony has shown desire for cam- 
pus and national recognition by participation in Greek 
activities and membership in various University organi- 
zations. Members won a first-place trophy in Pork Bar- 
rel in 1961 and a second-place award for their Home- 
coming display last year. Taking active part in frater- 
nity intramurals and IFC, the Teakes, as the group is 
known, hope to go national in 1963. 




■*■ '1^ 'm- 



BROTHERS FOUR 

Showing off new finery. 



FOOD FOR THOUGHT 

Mixing a Pork Barrel skit. 





Melvin Moorman, Pres. 
Dale Blass, V. Pres. 
Lester Ruszkowski, Sec. 
Peter Bau, Treas. 
Aurel Pamfilio, Hist. 
Helen Smith, Housemother 



Gary Beach 
Curtiss Corsello 
Tarey Cullen 
Les Fichter 
Gilbert Gerstenberger 
Richard Hanks 



PIANIST 

Or a "Great Pretender?" 






JiAMM^ih 




MiMjtMAik 




Edmund Hirsch 
Richard Hollow 
Donald Kallenborn 
Ronald Kessler 
Ron Lyme 
Paul Lorentzen 



Frank Meyerholtz 
Douglas Morrell 
Michael Oker 
John Perme 
William Searcy 
Russell Sopko 



Cleop Club 



Although a local sorority, the Cleops Club is hoping to 
gain recognition as a national organization. A proba- 
tionary member of Panhellenic Coimcil, the club has 
shown a desire for full acceptance by participating in 
all-campus activities. The group won second place in 
the Alpha Phi Omega quartet contest, took part in 
Penny Carnival and in intramurals with other campus 
sororities. A service as well as a social organization, the 
Cleops ushered at various University functions, stuffed 
envelopes for the Senior Women's Banquet and aided 
an underprivileged Kent family during the year. 



SERVICE 

Aiding an underprivileged Kent family. 





Cleop Club, Front row, i-r: Ruby Wyatt. Barbara Dukes, Rebecca Williams, Sandra Walker, Jacquelyn Warren, Odessa 
Perry. Row 2: Joan Bi;rry, Daine Bates, Thelma Hill, Marilyn Hilliard, Anita Miller, Doris Wilkinson, advisor. 





J^dtMd 




Ronald Isele, Pres. 
Paul Laemmle, V. Pres. 
Tom Eaton, Corr. Sec. 
Philip Kunze, Rec. Sec. 
Richard O'Brien, Treas. 



4 




Clii Sigma 



Chi Sigma, the second of Kent's colonies, was 
founded in January, 1962. Since that time the 
Chi Sigs have been working toward the status 
of social fraternity. The colony was active in 
Interfraternity Council and fraternity intramu- 
rals. The 18 members are included in many of 
the functions held by the national fraternity, 
Sigma Chi. In May, 1962, the group attended 
Sigma Chi State Day in Columbus. During the 
summer a delegate was sent to the Sigma Chi 
workshop in Illinois. Chi Sigma also partici- 
pated in social events with the Akron alumni 
chapter of Sigma Chi. 



CHI SIG SPIRIT 

Hats off to Kent. 




^ndi^ 



John Boron 
Larry Eger 
Thomas Geib 
Kenneth Granville 
Kenneth Hahn 
Robert Jones 



Glen Kreisher 
Daniel Martin 
Wade Mertz 
Milton Rudy 
Frank Sturgeon 



Delta Sigma Pi 
professional fraternity 




PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

Using business knowledge to promote smoker. 



Combining business with pleasure is Delta Sigma Pi, 
national Professional business fraternity. Organized on 
campus in 1938 as Delta Kappa Pi, the local chapter 
affiliated nationally in 1942. In line with its two-fold 
purpose, Delta Sigma Pi fostered scholarship in the 
study of business while encouraging a varied social life. 
With 35 members, the fraternity sponsored an array of 
professional and social events during the year: a Monte 
Carlo party, student-faculty coffee hours, winter and 
spring formals and field trips. The Delta Sigs annually 
present a scholarship key to the outstanding graduate 
in the College of Business Administration. The frater- 
nity took second place in softball competition for inde- 
pendent men last spring. 



PROFESSIONALS ^ 

Away from the office. 





AlberrHartman, Pres. 
Joe Megery, Sr. V. Pres. 
Gerald Glovka, Jr. V. Pres. 
Ronald Reedick, Sec. 
Richard Flack, Treas. 
James Daniels, Hist. 



Chalmers Monteith, Advisor 

Scott Shapiro 

Minor Lewis 

Frank Bigley 

Ralph Bingham 

Robert Boody 



Sam DeAngelo 
Jerry Donoghue 
Dennis Feola 
John Gambaccini 
Michael Golombuski 
Robert Hagmeyer 



Robert Hajek 
Ed Hibler 
Lad Humel 
Donald Locotosh 
Tim Lynsky 
Dennis Monos 



Ralph Myers 
John O'Donnell 
Leonard Orseno 
Richard Paplinski 
Gary Payne 
Walter Vlasak 



James White 
Arch Woodside 




SPRING CLEANING 

Sign of distinction for the house. 



Seniors 



Two months before President Bowman took office in 1944, 
Kent State University's enrollment totalled 891 students. 
This June, the University will graduate more than 1,000 
seniors, attesting to the phenomenal growth of the campus. 
For this thousand, it is hoped that the four-year molding 
process has served as a preparation for the larger education 
of daily life. In future years these, who have been part of 
the University world, may come to agree with Louisa May 
Alcott that "life is my college." 



A 



CARL ADAMS 

Cleveland 
JON ADAMS 

Cuyahoga Falls 
ANNE ADDIS 
Lakewood 





^ik 



ANITA AGARAND 

Canton 
ROBERT AGEE 

Tallmadge 
LARRY AHERN 
Parma 



GEORGIANNA AIVALIOTIS 

Steubenville 
DONNA ALCORN 

Warren 
IRENE ALDRICH 

Akron 
MICHAEL ALDRICH 

Akron 
CHRISTINE ALEXANDER 

Cuyahoga Falls 



ROBERT ALFORD 

Wintersville 
EDWARD ALLEN 

Ravenna 
LOIS ALLEN 

Newton Falls 
BERNARD ALMAYER 

South Euclid 
THOMAS ALTWIES 

Cuyahoga Falls 




VITA ANGEL 

Sugarcreek 
JAMES ANGLE 

Cleveland 
STANLEY ARNETT 

Louisville 













NORMA BALL 

Ashtabula 
EARL BARDALL 

Freeport 
GERALD BARILLA 

Steubenville 



NANCY BARKHURST 

Mt. Pleasant 
BARBARA BARNES 

Avon Lake 
SUSAN BARNES 

Mansfield 




JAMES ATTWOOD 

Euclid 
SAUNDRA AUCHTER 

Coraopolis, Pa. 
JAMES AUMAN 

Akron 
HELE AUNING 

Cleveland 
ANN AYRES 

Attica 



RUDOLPH BACHNA 

Canton 
DARLENE BAKER 

Solon 
ROGER BAKER 

Akron 
DARLA BAILEY 

Ashtabula 
ESTHER BALDAUF 

Painesville 



ELEANOR BARNETT 

Cleveland Heights 
GWENDOLYN BENNET 

Cleveland 
SANDRA BARNETT 

Salem 
JOSEPH BARNETTE 

Akron 
PHILLIP BARTLETT 

Tallmadge 



MONA BARTLEY 

Cuyahoga Falls 
CAROL BARTON 

Parma 
BARBARA BASINSKI 

Elyria 
JUDY BASSETTI 

New Philadelphia 
JOSEPH BAST 

Canton 



B 



LEDA BATTES 

Cleveland 
PETER BAU 

Gnadenhutten 

ROSEMARY BAUER 

Cuyahoga Falls 



SAMUEL BAUER 

Windham 
KATHLEEN BAUGHMAN 

Poland 
JAMES BAXTER 

Euclid 



CAROL BEAL 

Cuyahoga Falls 

NANCY BECHER 
Akron 

BRUCE BECHTEL 
Thompson 



KATHERINE BEES 

Youngstown 
EARL BELDEN 

Windham 
CHARLES BELKNAP 

Mantua 
ROSEMARY BENESH 

Cleveland 
NANCY BENJAMIN 

PainesvilJe 



NEIL BENNEKAMPER 

Cuyahoga Falls 
ANDREA BENNER 

Canton 
MIKE BENYA 

Barberton 
NICHOLAS BENYO 

Parma Heights 
RICHARD BERARDINELL 

Cleveland 




isk^i 




^^'SJUHHIil^BliSHI 




GABOR BRACHNA 

Cleveland 
CHARLES BRADSHAW 

Willoughby 
LYNNE BRANDES 

Warren 



CAROL BERRY 

Willard 
EDITH BERSON 

Canton 
JOHN BIANCHI 

Cleveland 
CHARLES BIGGS 

Cuyahoga Falls 
PAUL BIHN 

Wadswordi 



DONNA BILEK 

Williamsfield 
ROBERT BLACK 

Painesville 
JOHN BLACKMORE 

Cleveland Heights 
JAMES BLACKSTONE 

Massillon 
BETTE BLAKSLEE 

Medina 



HOWARD BLISS 

Cuyahoga Falls 
MICHELE BLOOMFIELD 

Shaker Heights 
MARIE BOARMAN 

Warren 
MARILYN BOCK 

Warren 
FRANK BOFFA 

Cleveland 



PETER BOGARDUS 

North Canton 
ANTHONY BOGOVICH 

Canton 
SHARON BOLLINGER 

Wooster 
JUDITH BOND 

Cuyahoga Falls 
M. ELIZABETH BORN 

Akron 



B 



STANLEY BRANSKY 

Maple Heights 
MARGARET BRENISER 

Navarre 
THOMAS BRENNER 

Barberton 



RICHARD BREZOVEC 

Cleveland 
DON BROTT 

Akron 
IRIS BROWN 

Cleveland 



LAIRD BROWN 

Kent 
LARRY BROWN 

Akron 
MARION BROWN 

Akron 



MARY JANE BROWN 

Girard 
MATTHEW BROWN 

Cleveland 
RICHARD BROWN 

Hartville 



TOBIE BROWN 

Cleveland Heights 
WILLIAM BROWN 

Cleveland 
RICHARD BROWSKE 

Cleveland Heights 



JACQUELINE BRUCK 

Parma 
RONALD BRUGGER 

Rochester, N. Y. 
JUDITH BRUNDIC 

Richmond Heights 








FRANK BRUNO 

Ravenna 
GERALD BRYAN 

Williamslield 
SARA BRYAN 

Doylestown 
JOHN BUCEY 

Toronto 
JOHN BUCHKO 

Middleburg Hts. 



AARON BUCHMAN 

Cleveland Hts. 
BARBARA BUDZIAK 

Parma 
BRENDA BULGRIN 

Barberton 
JOLENE BULKOWSKI 

Fostoria 
JAMES BULLOCK 

Ravenna 



RONALD BUNKER 

Kent 
VIRGINIA BUNTING 

Loudonville 
NORMAN BURGH 

Canton 
DALE BURGER 

Alliance 
MARLENE BURGER 

Parma 



PATRICIA BURGESS 

Warren 
JOHN BURNHAM 

Akron 
MONROE BURNETT 

Euclid 
JOYCE BURRELL 

Akron 
ROSEMARY BURSON 

Canton 



DONNA BURTNER 

Valencia, Pa. 
GUNTA BURVIS 

Cleveland Hts. 
SHARON BUSHANIC 

Parma 
BENJAMIN BUTLER 

Akron 
MARY ELIZABETH CAESAR 

Hubbard 



MARY ELLEN CAIRNS 

Canton 
SALLY CALLAHAN 

Cleveland 
ROBERT CAMERON 

Youngstown 
GEORGE CAMP III 

Chagrin Falls 
BARBARA CAMPBELL 

Cleveland 



ROSS CAMPBELL 

Deerfield 
MARY JANE CAPPONI 

Kent 
NANCY CARLSON 

Cuyahoga Falls 



SANDRA CARNES 

Mansfield 
GARY CARNICOM 

Cleveland 
DAVID CARR 

Chagrin Falls 



NANCY CARRIER 

Leroy 
ROGER CARRIER 

Newton Falls 
EDWARD CARTER 

Cleveland Hts. 
ROBERT CASEY 

Conneaut 
PAUL CASTLE 

Brooklyn Hts. 



ADELE CECCONI 

Canton 
PATRICIA CEDERVALL 

Willoughby 
PATRICIA CERTO 

Akron 
NOEL CHAMBERLAIN 

Bay Village 
JOSEPH CHIPPI 

Cleveland 







ROBERT CIPTAK 

Kent 
DAVID CLATTERBUCK 

Massillon 
H. R-UTH CLINE 

East Liverpool 




MARGERY CLUNK 

Garfield Hts. 
GRETCHEN CLUTTERBUCK 

Newark 
GEORGE CODY 

Cleveland 
JOHN COGAN 

Ashtabula 
ELI COHEN 

Cleveland 



BRUCE COLLINS 

Kent 
CAROLYN COLONNA 

Euclid 
KAREN CONDLEV 

Kent 
JOYCE CONE 

Painesville 
RUTH CONGDON 

Jefferson 



RICHARD COOK 

Canton 
DOUGLAS COPE 

Lorain 
KATHLEEN COUGHLIN 

Akron. N. Y. 
JANET RAE COVER 

Newton Falls 
NANCY COX 

Willoughby 



JUDITH CRABBS 

St. Clair Shores, Mich. 
CARL CRAINE 

Garfield Hts. 
DOROTHY CRAVER 

Garrettsville 
LEE CRAWFORD 

Chagrin Falls 
THOMAS CRAWFORD 

Euclid 



MARY DATISH 

Warren 
BUNNY DAVENPORT 

Meadville, Pa. 
TERRY DAVIS 

West Richfield 
NANCY DAWES 

Cuyahoga Falls 
KENNETH DAY 

Bedford 



KAREN DEAN 

Elyria 
GARY DEBUVITZ 

Cuyahoga Falls 
HERBERT DECKERT 

Lakewood 
GEORGE DELGROSSO 

Cleveland 
PAUL DENIREO 

Erie, Pa. 



SANDRA CRILE 

Akron 
JANE CRITCHFIELD 

Clairton, Pa. 
JON CRITCHFIELD 

Shreve 



SUZANNE CROZIER 

Cleveland 
MARY LOU CUNNINGHAM 

Perry 
ROSE-ELLEN CZAYKA 

Geneva 



NANCY DALY 

Suffield 
JAMES DANIELS 

Shreve 
JOAN DANIELS 

Fremont 



CHRISTINE DANKO 

Olean. N. Y. 
ANNAMAE DANNES 

Willowick 
RAYMOND DARBY 

Kent 






LINDA DERIGO 

Middleburg Hts. 
CAROLE DEROCHE 

Canton 
JOHN DICINTIO 

Akron 
JOSEPH DIRUSCIO 

Canton 
DIANA DESANTIS 

Warren 



JOHN DESMONE 

Cleveland 
EDWARD DEVILLE 

Lisbon 
JUDITH DICKERSON 

Mansfield 
LEO DICOLA 

Canton 
GEORGE DISBERGER 

Perry 



WILLIAM DISBRO 

Cuyahoga Falls 
DONALD DISCENZO 

South Amherst 
FRANK DITTRICH 

Chagrin Falls 
DANIEL DIXON 

Willowick 
LAUREL DODSON 

Twinsburg 



THEODORA DOLESKI 

Warnock 
T. E. DOLL 

Massillon 
LOU DOMJAN 

Cleveland 
MICHAEL DONNELLY 

Lakewood 
MARIO DONOFRIO 

Cleveland 



PHYLLIS DRASLER 

Cleveland 
DONALD DROUHARD 

Wooster 
DAVID DUDA 

Garfield Hts. 



D 



CARL DURST 

Mogadore 
JOSEPH DYLAG 

Cleveland 
MARILYN EARLEY 

Beloit 



RICHARD EATON 

Kent 
CAROL EBBERT 

Ravenna 
NOVA EDGERTON 

Lcctonia 



NANCY EDMAN 
Rocky River 

CAROL EDMONDS 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

JUDITH EHLEN 
Zanesville 



RICHARD EHLKE 

Elyria 
DONALD EHRHART 

Lancaster, Pa. 
ROBERT EICHNER 

Kent 



JAMES EISMON 
East Cleveland 

DAVID ELIA 
Painesville 

BARBARA ELIAS 
Steubenville 



DAVID ELLIOTT 

Canton 
MARTHA ELLIOTT 

Perry 
M. LOUISE ELLIS 

Conneaut Lake, Pa. 





F. LEE ELLS 

Lakewood 
RON EMCH 

Rittman 
LYNDA ENGLE 

Canton 
CAROL ERICSON 

Jamestown, N. Y. 
GILBERT ERKKILA 

Painesville 



CAROLYN EWING 

Barberton 
JANICE EVANO 

Toronto 
JEAN FARINA 

Galion 
TEIANA FEDOROWYCZ 

Parma 
BARBARA FENLEY 

South Euclid 



LYNN FERGUSON 

Kent 
MANUEL FERNANDEZ 

Barberton 
WILLIAM FERRELL 

Akron 
WILLIAM FERRY 

Amsterdam 
LEE FIEDLER 

Cuyahoga Falls 



FRANCINE FRIEDMAN 

University Hts. 
LEE FIERMAN 

Cleveland Hts. 
CATHY FINK 

Jefferson 
JUDITH FINKEL 

Wellington 
NANCY FIORINO 

Youngstown 



CONNIE FISHER 

Akron 
RICHARD FLACK 

Cleveland 
GERALD FLAK 

Alliance 
JOHN FLASCO 

Akron 
NORMAN FLEETER 

Mayfield Hts. 



KAY FLETCHER 

Mentor 
CAROLE FLIGNOR 

Lorain 
JAMES FLORIAN 

Parma Hts. 
JAMES FLYNN 

Toledo 
THOMAS FOLTY 

Akron 



F 



ROBERT FORD 

East Cleveland 
PATRICIA FORREST 

Grafton 
LOUISE FOSl ER 



RALPH FOX 

Canton 
RONALD FRANCE 

Cin.ihos.i Falls 
JOSEPH FRANKIE 

Warren 




Mi^ 



BARBARA FRASER 

Cu\.iho-j,.y Falls 
CAROLYN FREAS 

Lakewood 
CAROLE FRATER 

Garfield Hts. 
DAVID FREEMAN 

Euclid 
AWE FREY 

Chagrin Falls 



JACK FRISTOE 

Akron 
NORMA FULK 

Jeromesville 
JANIS FULLER 

Geneva 
MARIA FUR 

Cleveland 
MARY FUREY 

Hanoverton 




ROBERT FUREY 

Malvern 
ROBERTA GABEL 

Cuyahoga Falls 
LYNN GALAM BOSSY 
Girard 



RONALD GALITSKY 

Campbell 
JUDITH GALLOWAY 

Olmsted Falls 
MICHAEL GAREAU 

North Olmsted 



■|K .'W|i«H 





BARBARA GARLAND 

Scotia, N. Y. 
DEE GARRISON 

Akron 
RICHARD GATES 

Aurora 
BARBARA GAYDAR 

Parma Hts. 
VIRGINIA GAYLORD 

Sharon Center 



JOHN GEORGE 

Akron 
RAY GEORGE 

Kent 
DIANE GERBER 

Salem 
JUDITH GIBBONS 

Lakewood 
DIANA GIBSON 

Akron 



JON GLASER 

South Amherst 
MARILYN GLASS 

Cleveland Hts. 
JAMES GLAVIC 

Maple Hts. 
SANDRA GLOVER 

Uniontown, Pa. 
ROBERT GODLEWSKI 

Lorain 



MARY GOEKJIAN 

Shaker Hts. 
FRANCINE GOLDSTEIN 

South Euclid 
JAMES GOMBAC 

Parma 
JAMES GONCZY 

Mantua 
MARILYN GONDER 

Canton 



G 



JERRY GREEN 

Steubenville 
REBECCA GREEN 



JOYCE GOODSPEED 

Elyria 
GALE GORDON 

Stow 
WILLIAM GORDOS 

Euclid 



ELAINE GORENCE 

Warren 
MARLENE GOUGLER 

Akron 
MARLENE GRABILL 

Warren 



SANDRA GRABAN 

Kent 
WARREN GRABNER 

Wayne, Ind. 
SUSAN GRAHAM 

Cuyahoga Falls 



Pair 



■ille 



WILLIAM C. GREEN 

Ashtabula 
WILLIAM W. GREEN 

Kent 
VIRGINIA GREENE 

East Cleveland 




SHERIE GREENLESE 

Akron 
MARGARET GRIFFITHS 

Columbiana 
BARBARA GRILLS 

Columbia Station 
JACK GRISSOM 

Hudson 




LINDA GRAU 

Mentor 
DONALD GRAY 

Hubbard 
EILEEN GREEN 

Cleveland 



I 




LAUREN GROMEN 

Berea 
PATRICIA GRUBBE 

Sandusky 
LORNA HAAPANEN 

Conneaut 
THOMAS HAAS 

Niles 
ROY HADDEN 

Euclid 



PAUL HADINGER 

Atwater 
JANET HAD LEY 

Fredericktown 
MARJORIE HALE 

Upper Sandusky 
EILEEN HALTER 

Garfield Heights 
LINDA HAMILTON 

Maumee 



NORMAN HAMM 

Parma 
JOHN HAMPTON 

Coshocton 
ELAINE HANCHULAK 

Warren 
GARY HUNDLER 

Shaker Heights 
SANDRA HANNA 

Akron 



GERALD HANNAY 

Louisville 
DAVID HANSEN 

Cuyahoga Falls 
CAROL HANSROTE 

Akron 
CHARLES HARDISTY 

Dayton 
LANA HARDMAN 

Alliance 



BETTY HARRY 

Akron 
EDGAR HARTZELL 

Alliance 

REED HARVEY 

Salem 



H 



JOYCE HASKELL 

East Cleveland 
ANN HASTINGS 

Wooster 
KENNETH HATHAWAY 

Louisville 



WILLIAM HAVAS 

Cleveland 
BETTY HAWKINS 

Steubenville 
ANNE HAYDEN 

Cuyahoga Falls 



LINDA HAYS 

Beaver Falls, Pa. 

BRIAN HEBERLING 
Wadsworth 

FRED HECKMAN 
New Milford 



LARRY HECKY 

Cuyahoga Falls 
LINDA HEDDEN 

Hornell, N. Y. 
THOMAS HEINZ 

Euclid 



LINDA HELM 

Ashtabula 
DAVID HENCSHEL 

Brecksville 
MARILYN HENDERSON 

Cleveland 



LINDA HENDRICKS 

Kent 
RUSSELL HERIG 

Kent 
JERRY HICKERSON 

Kent 





SUSAN HILL 

Andover 
MARILYN HILLIARD 

Cleveland 
LINDA HIMES 

Louisville 
JANET HIRD 

Youngstown 
EDMUND HIRSCH 

Euclid 



JOAN HIRSCH 

Kent 
JOYCE HOCHHEISER 

Stow 
NANCY HOFER 

Homeworth 
CHARLES HOFF 

Massillon 
CARL HOFFMAN 

Bakersville 



WILLIAM HOFFMAN 

Bradfordwoods, Pa. 
THOMAS HOHENSHIL 

Smithville 
ELAINE HOLDEN 

Geneva 
MARILYN HOLDSWORTH 

West Lafayette 
DOROTHY HOLECKO 

Newton Falls 



DONNA HOLLEN 

Barberton 
GAY HOLLENBACK 

Ravenna 
WILLIAM HOLSKEY 

Akron 
JAMES HOOBLER 

Elmira, N. Y. 
CHARLES HOOKS 

Maple Heights 



JOHN HOOVER 

Toronto 
SAMUEL HOPKINS 

Columbus 
KAREN HORKY 

Bedford 
MARIANNE HORVATH 

Barberton 
BERNARD HOVAN 

Cleveland 



DENNIS HOWELL 

Warren 
PETE HRONEK 

Maple Heights 
CAROLYN HUBER 

Kent 
ROBERT HUFFED 

Berea 
CAROLYN HUFLER 

Canton 



H 



CHARLOn E HUGHES 

Conncaut 
JAMES HUGHES 

Shiloh 
JAMES HULTIN 

East Cleveland 



CHARLES HUSTON 

East Cleveland 
JAMES HUTTON 

Canton 
ROGER ISHEE 

Chardon 
SANDRA JACKSON 

Chardon 
EUGENE JAKULIS 

East Cleveland 



EESIK JANDURA 

Canton 
SALLY JANES 

Wadsworth 
KAYHRYN JANSON 

Euclid 
(iEORGE JENKINS 

Cadi^ 
WILLIAM JENSEN 

Warren 




JOYCE JOHNSON 

Navarre 
LAURIE JOHNSON 

Leavittsburg 
KITTY JOHNS ION 

Garrctlsville 



298 




CAROL JONES 

Elyria 
GARY JONES 

Massillon 
HARRISON JONES 

Cuyahoga Falls 
KAREN JONES 

South Amherst 
JOYCE JURCAK 

Westlake 



SALLY KADIS 

Cleveland Heights 
JANET KADOWAKI 

Garfield Heights 
JOHN KADUCK 

Cleveland 
B. ALLYN KAIN 

Snyder, N. Y. 
PETER KAKIS 

Continental 



PAT KEELOR 

Rocky River 
ROBERT KELLOGG 

Medina 
BETTE MAE KELLEY 

Oberlin 
RONALD KEMELHAR 

Beechwood 
DENNIS KEMPF 

Coshocton 



ELMIRA KENDRICKS 

Cincinnati 
RONALD KESSLER 

Cleveland 
JACK KESTNER 

Toronto 
DENNIS KEYERLEBER 

Willoughby 
CYNTHIA KEYS 

Steubenville 



K 



JAMES KLEIXFELD 

Middlefield 
JOHN KNIGHT 

Stow 
RALPH KLINGER 

North Royalton 
JOHN KLOSS 

Warren 
KATHERIN KNIPPENBERG 



KEITH KNOBLOCK 

Sandusky 
DAVID KNOW 

Akron 
MARY ANN KOBA 

Lorain 
RUTHMARY KOHLER 

Fairview Park 
VIKKI KOHLHOF 

Burton 



THOMAS KIKENDALL 

Cuyahoga Falls 
THOMAS KILKER 

Ashtabula 
CHARLES KIMBALL 

Hudson 



JANET KING 
Dillonvale 
KATHLEEN KING 

Springfield, Mass. 
RONALD KING 
Painesville 



BARBARA KISH 

Cleveland 
DAVID KISH 

East Cleveland 
OLGA KITRINOU 

Youngstown 



NEVA KITZMILLER 

Homeworth 
MARGARET KLASS 

Plainfield, N. J. 
JAMES KLEIN 

Canton 




mhi^ 








I 




mamk 



dUM 





IRVING KUNDTZ 

Cleveland 
WILLIAM KVET 

Euclid 
NANCY KVVALLEK 

Kent 



LINDA LAMARCA 
Youngstown 

ALFRED LAMBO 
Eastlake 

HERMAN LAMERS 
Bedford 



MIKE KOHN 

Shaker Heights 
JOHN KOKKO 

Lyndhurst 
ARLEEN KOLBY 

Parma 
KENNETH KOLTHOFF 

Strongsville 
ALLEN KORNER 

Shaker Heights 



VIRGINIA KOSARKO 

Strongsville 
ROSEMARY KOSEY 

Cleveland 
LINDA KOTELES 

Medina 
ANDREW KOTWIS 



Bellaire 

JAMES KOVACH 

Lisbon 



LAURIE KOVACS 

Hudson 
THOMAS KRACKER 

Massillon 
ROBERT KRAMER 

Medina 
SARA KRAUS 

Cuyahoga Falls 
KENNETH KREINER 

Mogadore 



JEFFREY KREUTZER 

Youngstown 
RONALD KRIVEC 

Euclid 
VINCENT KUBANCIK 

Kent 
GERALDINE KUCINSKI 

Maple Heights 
GEORGE KULCZYCKYI 

Cleveland 



WILLIAM LAMONT 
Cuyahoga Falls 

GEORGE LANDIS 
Beloit 

KENNETH LANDOLL 
Norwalk 



MARY LANDOR 

Canton 
ANNE LANGE 

Sandusky 
KAY LANGELL 

Ravenna 



JEAN LANZI 

Panna 
DIANE LAPOLLA 

Cuyahoga Falls 
EDWARD LEANZA 

Cleveland Heights 



ROBERT LEASE 

Warren 
SHAREN LEATH 

Canton 
GRANT LEDFORD 

Akron 



STEPHEN LEDGER 

Newton Falls 
JOHN LEE 

Cuyahoga Falls 
GARY LEGG 

Crestline 




TERRENCE LEQUYEA 

Brecksville 
DAVID LEMOINE 

Akron 
MICHAEL LENNA 

Dillonvale 



^^ 





GRETCHEN LETZELTER 

Dillonvale 
JOHN LEVENTIS 

Warren 
JOSEPH LEWIS 

Cuyahoga Falls 
THOMAS LEWIS 

Parma 
SHARON LIEBERMAN 

Cleveland 



JACK LILIE 

Randolph, N. Y. 
JEAN LILLEY 

Euclid 
MAYRIS LIND 

Aurora 
BARBARA LIPINSKI 

Cleveland 
PAULA LISKA 

East Cleveland 



DIANA LLOYD 

Canton 
MARTHA LOCKE 

Nonvalk 
DONALD LOCOTOSH 

Painesville 
PRISCILLA LODGE 

Bannock 
KATHERIXE LOMBARDO 

Garfield Hts. 



BONNIE LOOMIS 

Newton Falls 
MARJORY LOSCH 

Alliance 
RICHARD LOUGHRY 

Canton 
WANDA LOUIE 

Cleveland 
DALE LOVE 

Euclid 



ROBERT LOVE 

Akron 
GAY LUCAS 

Kent 
LARRY LUCK 

Barberton 
JOHN LUCKNER. JR. 

Massillon 
MARILYN LUDWICK 

South Euclid 



RUTH LUOMA 

Ashtabula 
THOMAS LUPICA 

Toledo 
BILLY LUTES 

Akron 
PHYLLIS LUTZ 

Hartville 
RON LYME 

Loudonville 



DALE LYONS 

Ashtabula 
CARL LYTLE 

Fredericksburg 
KENNETH McCARTOR 

Salem 



LELA McCASLIN 

Akron 
JANET McCLEERY 

Beaver, Pa. 

NANCY McClelland 

McDonald 



LAWRENCE McCORMICK 

Kent 
LEWIS McCURRY 

Canton 

LARRY McDonald 

Canton 
MARGARET McGlNTY 

Cleveland 
LINDA McGONIGAL 

Dover 



ROBERT McGRUDER 

Dayton 
MARY McHENRY 

University Hts. 
RICHARD McKENZIE 

Washingtonville 
MARJORY A. McLAREN 

Alliance 
FAITH McMAHON 

Cuyahoga Falls 





ERROL McNEAL 

Canton 
DOLORES McQUINEY 

Warren 
ROGER MAGILL 

Cirdeville 



PATRICIA MAHOVLIC 
Warrensville Hts. 

MARGARET MAIRS 
Akron 

JEAN ANN MAJICK 
Mineral Ridge 



LINDA MARTIN 

Rav 
NOMA MARTIN 

Fredericksburg 
WILLIAM F. MARTIN 

Youngstown 
WILLIAM R. MARTIN 

Barberton 




FRANCES MAJOR 

West Richfield 
MARTIN MALATIN 

Maple Hts. 
SANDRA MALINAS 

Cleveland Hts. 
MARLENE MALLARNEE 

Scio 
ROSEMARIE MARINO 

Lorain 



GARY MARSHALL 

Ravenna 
JERRY MARSHALL 

Akron 
ELAINE MARTIN 

Painesville 
JANETTE MARTIN 

Ashland 
JOHN MARTIN 

Cuyahoga Falls 



MARIA MARTINI 

Youngstown 
WILLIAM MARTZ 

Cuvahoga Falls 
JOANN MASKOW 

Westlake 
DIANE MATHEWS 

New Philadelphia 



l^iLifeil 



PEGGY MATHEY 

Mineral City 
GAIL MATHIS 

Canton 
WILLIAM MAURER 

Cleveland 
CAROLE MAXWELL 

Girard 
RELDA MAXWELL 

Jeromesville 



RICHARD MECK 

Lorain 
WILLIAM MEISSNER 

Kent 
DAVID MENGES 

Kent 
RICHARD MERSHMAN 

Delphos 
WADE MERTZ 



M 



JAMES METCALF 

Tallmadge 
PETER METROVICK 

East Liverpool 
FRANK iMEVERHOLTZ 

Napoleon 



RICHARD MEZERA 

Parma 
JUDITH MICHAEL 

Canton 
CAROLE MIKASH 

Northfield 



ANITA MILLER 

Alliance 
HARRIET MILLER 

Barberton 
MARVBETH MILLER 

Cuyahoga I'alls 



SANDRA MILLER 

Solon 
THOMAS A. MILLER 

Cuyahoga Falls 
THOMAS K. MILLER 

Ravenna 



SANDRA MILLS 

Tallmadge 
GEORGE MILOSEVICH 

Steubenville 
MARY MINADEO 

Bedford 
BARBARA MINER 

Chagrin Falls 
PHYLLIS MINTZ 

Ashtabula 



THOMAS MOIR 

Rocky River 
MARGARET MOLIN 

McDonald 
SUSAN MOLNAR 

Lorain 
LOIS MONOS 

Lorain 
ADA MONTAGNER 

Cleveland 






MARY MONTGOMERY 

Alliance 
LINDA MOOK 

Conneaut 
DANIEL MOORE 

Barnesville 
PHYLLIS MOORE 

Ravenna 
MELVIN MOORMAN 

Leipsic 



JOYCE MORFORD 

Kinsman 
DOUGLAS MORRELL 

Wadsworth 
MICHAEL MORRELL 

Kent 
NORA MOTTL 

Northfield 
PATRICIA MOWIXSKI 

Northfield 



JAMES MOXLEY 

Lakewood 
ROBERT MUELLER 

Cleveland 
DARLEXE MULLETT 

Barberton 
NANCY MUNDY 

Salem 
JANICE MUNGER 

Jefferson 



LINDA MURPHY 

Akron 
SUZANNE MURPHY 

Cleveland 
KAY MURRAY 

Parma 
NANCY MUSSELMAN 

Massillon 
DIANE MYERS 

Akron 




DONALD NADER 

Cleveland 
MARCALEE NARAGON 

Salem 
RICHARD NATURALE 

Ravenna 



MARGARET NEBERGALL 

Sandusky 
SALLY NEFF 

Warren 
HELEN NEMEC 

Bay Village 



N 



JULIA NEWELL 

Oberlin 
SARA NICELY 

East Cleveland 
JANICE NIIXISTO 

Conneaut 



RUTH NILSSON 

Tallmadge 
ZENOVIA NIiMYLOWVCZ 

Cleveland 
DAVID NORRIS 

Seven Hills 



CONSTANCE NOSAN 

Willoughby 
CARL NO THHAFT 

Sharon, Pa. 
DIANE NOVKOV 

Akron 



GERALD NOWAK 
Garfield Hts. 

THOMAS NVLUND 
Stone Creek 

VALERIE OAKUM 
Akron 



RALPH OATES 

Alliance 
DANIEL OBRINGER 

Norwalk 
EILEEN" OCKULY 

Parma Hts. 



MICHAEL OKER 

Cleveland 
TED OLCZAK 

Maple Hts. 
MARTHA OLINKEVYCH 

Cleveland 





iMiiiEl 




LOIS OLIVER 

Mansfield 
WAYNE OLLILA 

Painesville 
JUDITH ORTON 

North East, Pa. 
MARION OSBORN 

Cleveland 
ROBERT OSBORNE 

Warren 



RICHARD PAIGE 

Albany, N. Y. 
E. CAROL PANCOST 

Sycamore 
DANIEL PAPPANO 

Akron 
RICHARD PAPLINSKI 



RALPH PARDEE 



BRUCE PARKER 

Batavia, N. Y. 
BARBARA PARSH 

Kent 
GEORGE PARSONS 

Lyndhurst 
JAYNE PARYZEK 

Burton 
MILTON PASTERNAK 

Brecksville 



ROBERT PATON 

Kent 
JOHN PATTERSON 

Cuyahoga Falls 
DONALD PAUL 

Canton 
DAREEN PAWUK 

Cleveland 
KAYLEENE PAYER 

Girard 



RICHARD PAYSOR 

Kent 
JUDY PEATE 

Rocky River 
MONROE PEELER 

Cleveland 
THOMAS PEETZ 

Madison, Wis. 
DAVID PELLOW 

Kent 



LAWRENCE PENCE 

Cuyahoga Falls 
IRENE PENFIELD 

Cleveland 
EUGENE PENN 

Warren 
JUDY PENNELL 

Canton 
KATHLEEN PERDUE 

Garrettsville 



BONNIE PERKINS 

Chardon 
ROBERT PERKINS 

Canton 
NANCY PERRINE 

Columbiana 



NORMAN PETERSON 

Cleveland 
CHERYL PETRAITIS 

Akron 
VIVIAN PETRISON 

Canton 
PETER PETROFF 

Akron 
NANCY PEURA 

Ashtabula 



PENNY PFLEGER 

Bethesda 
JAMES PHELAN 

VersiUes 
WILLIAM PHILLIPS 

Salem 
NITASNA PICHITAKUL 

Bangkok, Thailand 
WILLIAM PIERSON 

East Liverpool 




PASCAL PIGLIA 

Cuyahoga Falls 
WILLIAM PIRTLE, II 

Twin Lakes 
DONNA M. PITTEN 

Cleveland 



DONNA R. PITTEN 

Cleveland 
JOANN PIXLEY 

Garrettsville 
JOSEPHINE PIZER 
Great Neck, N. Y. 



dM^^ 





JOSIE QUAGLIATE 

Cleveland 
JEAN QUINN 

Canton 
KAREN RAASCH 

LaGrange, 111. 



MARGARET PLAS 

Elyria 
CARL PLESNICHER 

Twinsburg 
BARBARA PLETCHER 

Asthbula 
JEANNETTE PLUCINSKI 

Berea 
EUGENIE PODOJIL 

Ravenna 



BETTY POLACSEK 

Cleveland Heights 
ISAAC POLLOCK 

Lyndhurst 
TERIA POULAKOS 

Youngstown 
SARAJAXE POWELL 

Euclid 
MAX POWRIE 

Lakewood 




JEANNE RAJKOWSKI 

Niles 
ELIZABETH RAMBACHER 

Akron 
JACQUELINE RAMELLA 

Rocky River 
DENNIS RAMEY 

Newton Falls 
LEE RAMSEY 

Kent 



HOWARD RANEN 

Cleveland 
TEODORO RAPONI 

Lorain 
RICHARD RAW 

Wadsworth 
MARIANNE RAYMOND 

Geneva 
DAVID READY 

Kent 



R 



KAREN REAGAN 
Jamestown, N. Y. 

CAROLYN REAMS 
Grafton 

MARY REDMAN 
Akron 



JAMES REED 

DiUonvale 
SANDRA REED 

Niles 
RONALD REEDICK 

Cleveland 




HAROLD REX 

Kent 
JO ANN REYNOLDS 

Parma 
KENNETH REYNOLDS 

Willoughby 
EVA RICE 

Bristolville 
MARGARET RICHARD 

Akron 



LOIS RICHARDS 

Northfield 
SYDNEY RICHARDS 

Bay Village 
BEVERLY RICHARDSON 

Portsmouth 
DONALD RICHESON 

Robertsville 
JOHN RIGOLI 

Buffalo, N. Y. 



CHARLES REIMAN 

Canton 
DONALD REJKOWSKI 

Tallmadge 
LAWSON RENNIE 

Kenosha, Wis. 















JEAN RUPERT 
New Waterford 

NANCY RUSS 
Canton 

GALE RUSSO 
Lorain 



LESTER RUSZKOWSKI 

Cleveland 
MILDRED SABO 

West Richfield 
BONNIE SALAY 

Aliquippa, Pa. 



VIRGINIA RILA 

Canfield 
CHARLES RIMBEY 

Beaver Falls, Pa. 
EDWIN RISLER 

Toronto 
SANDRA ROBB 

Orville 
CORINNE ROBERTS 

Woodstock, Vt. 



LAURA ROBERTS 

Stow 
SUSAN ROBERTSON 

New London 
VIRGINIA ROBINSON 

Newton Falls 
MARY SUZANNE RODDA 

Cleveland Hts. 
ROBERT ROG,\LSK.I 

Garfield Hts. 



ROSE ROGAN 

Youngstown 
FRANCIS ROGERS 

Kent 
NINA RONSHAUSEN 



Salem 
TED ROOT 



BARBARA ROSS 
North Royalton 



ROBERT ROSS 

Cleveland 
DAVID ROTH 

Kent 
KENNETH ROWE 

Cuyahoga Falls 
CLIFFORD RUDD 

North Olmsted 
DONALD RUPERT 

Cuyahoga Falls 



JEAN SALVADOR 

Lansing 
BARBARA SAMUELSON 

Copley 
[OSSELYN SANBORN 

Elma, N. Y. 



HARRIET SANFORD 

Akron 
KAREN SAVINSKY 

Lorain 
BRUCE SAXMAN 

Kent 



JUDITH SAXMAN 

Kent 
NOREEN SCHAEFER 

Euclid 
MARTHA SCHEIDLER 

North Ridgeville 



JOHN SCHILLER 

Erie, Pa. 
ROBERT SCHLEMMER 

Stow 
MARGARETE SCHMID 

Fairview Park 



STEPHEN SCHMIDT 

North Canton 
MARILYN SCHNEIDER 

Shaker Heights 
PATRICIA SCHONER 

Akron 



RICHARD SCHOOLEY 

Cuyahoga Falls 
LAWRENCE SCHRADER 

Akron 
SHERRI SCHROEDER 

Brecksville 





JOAN SCHROMEN 

Orrville 
FRANK SCHUBECK 

Lakewood 
CAROLYN SCHUENEMANN 

Parma 
DONNA SCHULTZ 

Parma Heights 
FRED SCHULTZ 

Alliance 



ELIZABETH SCHUMACHER 

Akron 
BARBARA SCHUSTER 

Salem 
ADOLPH SCHWARZ 

Cleveland 
PATRICIA SCHWEYER 

Canton 
HERMINE SCHWOLOW 

Maple Heights 



ROSALIE SCIANGULA 

Westlake 
NEIL SCOTT 

Akron 
RICHARD SCREDON 

Canton 
DAVID SEEMANN 

Canton 
DONALD SEIDNER 

North Lima 



NANCY SELZER 

Lakemore 
KENNETH SENFT 

Northfield 
RONALD SENSE 

Massillon 
DOROTHY SER 

Masury 
JOHN SERGI 



Canton 



NADWA SHARIF 

Akron 
NEIL SHARP 

Garfield Hts. 
HAROLD SHAW 

Cleveland 
JAMES SHELLEY 

Cuyahoga Falls 
JOAN SHEPLIN 

Akron 



DONNA SHEPPARD 

East Liverpool 
ANN SHIFTLETT 

McConnelsville 
SALLY SHIREY 

Olmsted Falls 
RICHARD SHOEMAKER 

Canton 
IRWIN SHULMAN 

University Heights 



ARTHUR SICHAU 

Cleveland 
LAVERNE SIDAWAY 

Massilon 
MARY ANN SILA 
Garfield Hts. 



BARBARA SINGER 

Akron 
PATRICIA SITES 

Cleveland 
KATHARINE SLAGEL 

Ironton 
DOROTHEA SLANKER 

Salem 
MONICA SMERICK 

Parma Heights 



ERMA SMITH 

Canton 
JEAN SMITH 

Cleveland 
MARK SMITH 

Wilmington 
ROBERT SMITH 

Akron 
SUSANNE SMITH 

Norwalk 




JANET SOOY 

Salem 
ELAINE SOPKA 

Hudson 
RUSSELL SOPKO 

Cleveland 



FRANCIS SOPYLA 

Parma 
FRANCINE SOSPIRATO 

Cleveland 
JEAN SPENCER 

Streetsboro 




i 




MARY SPETHAKIS 

Barberton 
JOHN SPIDLE 

Beach City 
JOHN SPOTTS 

Streetsboro 
JOYCE SPRINGER 

Jefferson 
KENNETH STAATS 

Akron 



PATRICIA STAINBROOK 

North Ridgeville 
RONALD STANLEY 

Kent 
JAMES STANTON 

Euclid 
CELLA STARR 

Litchfield 
JOHN STAVOT 

Canton 



LUBA STECIAK 

Cleveland 
JUDITH STEFANSIC 

Ravenna 
CAROLE STEIGERWALD 

Cleveland 



KAREN STEIN 

Braceville 
G. JAY STEPHENS 

Mansfield 
RONALD STESIAK 





DONALD STEWART 

Akron 
ELAINE STEWART 

Steubenville 
DAVID STILLSON 

Youngstown 
ALLEN STINSON 

Solon 
ALICE ST. JOHN 

Bristolville 



ROBERT STOCK 

Cuyahoga Falls 
HELEN STOKOVIC 

Salem 
KATHRYN STRIBRNY 

Hudson 
WILLIAM STROM 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
MATHIAS STROMMER 

Cleveland 



AMNUAY TANGTRONGCHITR 

Bangkok, Thailand 
CYNTHIA TAYLOR 

Cleveland Heights 
ANGELIQUE TELEMACHOS 

Cleveland 
NICK TELEMACHOS 

Cleveland 
JEFF THOMAS 

Cleveland 



SHARLENE THOMAS 

Warren 
NANCY SUE THOMAS 

East Cleveland 
JAMES THOMPSON 

Cincinnati 
JERRY THOMPSON 

Canton 
JOSEPH THOMPSON 

Lima 



HAROLD STUBBS 

Akron 
WALTER STUDER 

Canton 
THOMAS SUCHAN 

Seven Hills 



RICHARD SUDER 

Girard 
DONALD SULLIVAN 

Delaware 
RICHARD SUOMELA 

Fairport Harbor 




^ M I 



MARILYN SURFACE 
Ravenna 


THP 


RONALD SWARTZ 


V "" ^ 


Loudonville 


*— »'y>' 


THOMAS SWINFORD 
Canton 


^ jff£ 






DENNIS SYKORA 
Cleveland 


TH 



JOHN SZWAST 

Akron 
ROBERT TAIPALE 

Lake Milton 










318 




THOMAS THURMON 

East Rochester, N. Y. 
ARTHUR TIMMS 

Warren 
SHARON TIPPETT 

Columbus 
PATRICIA TITO 

Latrobe, Pa. 
MARY TITTLE 

Newbury 



ELLEN TODD 

Cleveland 
ROBERT TONNER 

Kent 
KAREN TOOHIG 

Cleveland 
MARGARET TOSHA 

Alliance 
DONALD TOTH 

Fairport Harbor 



ROSETTA TRACZYNSKI 

Cleveland 
MICHAEL TRAINA 

Chagrin Falls 
ROSE TRBOVICH 

Steubenville 
WILLIAM TRBOVICH 

Canton 
DAN TRIFELOS 

Canton 



JOSEPH TURKAL 

Massillon 
MICHAEL TURKO 

Youngstown 
RICHARD TUROCY 

Parma 
MABEL TUTTLE 

Madison 
STEPHEN UHALL 

Cleveland 




JERRY UNROE 

Kent 
CHRISTINE VAFIADES 

Akron 
C. JEAN VALIGORA 

St. Clairsville 



JOHN VAN 

Kent 
JANE VAN ALMEN 

Canton 
ANKA VANEFF 

Mansfield 



V 



JAMES VARGO 

South Amherst 
CHERYL VARNEY 

Cuyahoga Falls 
BRUCE VASKO 

Wickliffe 



JAMES VATAHA 

Cleveland 
RONALD VENEZIA 

Spring Valley, N. Y. 
CAROL VERMILLION 

East Liverpool 



RICHARD VILEM 

Cleveland 
RICHARD VINCIQUERRA 

Wickliffe 
JAMES VINE 

Garrettsville 



WALTER VLASAK 

Windsor 
WILLIAM VOGEL 

New Milford 
JUDITH VOLK. 

University Heiglits 



ROBERT VOORHEES 

Columbus 
EMIL VRANA 

Cleveland 
BARBARA WAGNER 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SIGRID WAGNER 

Peninsula 
ANN WAITINAS 

Chardon 
HARRY WALDBAUM 

Cleveland Hts. 





BRUCE WALKER 

Willoughby 
MAR\- WALKER 

Amherst 
iMAXLXE WALLACE 

Alliance 
BARBARA A.\.\ WALl ER 

South Euclid 
GERALD \VALTER 



J. DAVID WALTER 

Barnesville 
KERMIT WALTER 

Canton 
MARSHA WALTERS 

Bettsville 
MARGARET WAXDAS 

Kent 
JAMES \A'AN'LESS 

Akron 



WILLIAM WARD 

Elyria 
CLARENCE \VARFIELD 

Lorain 
BARBARA WARMAN 

Tallmadge 
FRANCES WARNER 

Strongsville 
KATHRYN WARREN 

Lakewood 



PATRICIA WASSON 

Newton Falls 
CAROL WATSON 

Wooster 
GEORGE \VEAVER 

Akron 
JAMES WEAVER 

Milliard 
LAUREL WEBSTER 

Painesville 



ELLEN WEIDNER 

Barberton 
SANDRA WEINHARDT 

Parma 
GAMBLE WEIR 

Kent 
DONNA WEISS 

Lakewood 
JOAN WELLS 

Akron 



RICHARD WELSH 

Columbus 
JOHN WELTON 

Kirtland 
MARGARET WELTZHEIMER 

Columbus 
WILLIAM WENDELL 

Eastlake 
DONALD WENNER 

North Olmsted 



w 



TODD WENNING 

Canton 
HARVEY WENSEL 

Garrettsville 
THOMAS WHEELER 

Akron 



LINDA \\HELLER 
Garfield Hts. 

JAMES WHITE 
Dover 

LUCILLE WHITE 
Warren 



JAMES WHITLEDGE 

Mantua 
JAY WHITMAN 

Barberton 
JOAX WICKS 

Middlefield 



RICHARD WIEDLUND 

Cleveland 
HAROLD WIGGINS 

Canton 
LAUREL WILCOX 

Cleveland 




miih 



JANICE WILKER 

Cleveland 
JOHN WILKINSON 

Elyria 
CAROLANNE WILLIAMS 

Zanesville 
ROGER WILLIAMS 

Lakewood 
RONALD WILLIAMS 

Lakewood 



DELLA WILSON 

Cuyahoga Falls 
LOIS WILSON 

Weslfield, N. J. 
NYRA WILSON 

Grafton 
WILLIAM WILSON 

Alliance 
MELVIN WILT 

Munroe Falls 





FRED WINTHER 

Akron 
RICHARD W'IRTH 

Cleveland 
MARJORIE WISE 

Waverly 
RICHARD WISEMAN 

Sandusky 
JUAMTA WISMEWSKI 

Cliardon 



ERAXK WITHEROW 

Dover 
VANGE WOLCOTT 

Atwater 
RICHARD \VOLF 

Poland 
CLAIRE WOLFE 

Bedford 
DONALD \VOODCOCK 

Akron 



RICHARD WOODRUFF 

Lindsey 
SARA WOODS 

Aurora 
THOMAS WOODS 

Massillon 
RUBY WVATT 

Cleveland 
EDWARD WVDARENY 

Kent 



PAUL YATES 

Parma 
SHING LANG YANG 

Formosa, China 
DARLEEN YEAGER 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
NANCY YENTCH 

Mentor 
MARY YODER 

Hartville 



LOIS YUND 

Wooster 
DOLORES YURTIN 

Warren 
YOLANDA YUTZEY 

Moundsville, W. Va. 



z 



t 



JANET ZACZEK 

Brookpark 
VIVIAX ZADOROZNY 

Lorain 
RONALD ZAGATA 

Maple Hts. 



LOIS ZAGRAY 

Akron 
PAUL ZAGRAY 

Akron 
DAVID ZAK 

Toledo 



ANNE ZIEGLER 

North Canton 
SUZANNE ZIELINSKI 

Garfield Hts. 
LAWRENCE ZIER 

Linden, N. J. 
FRANCES ZILKA 

Avon 
KENNETH ZITZ 

Cle\eland 



JACQUELYNN ZORZI 

Masury 
JOANNE ZUBER 

Massillon 
KAYE ZUFALL 

Copley 
ELAINE ZUMMER 

North Canton 
RUl H ZURN 

Maple Hts. 




Organization Index 



A Cappella Choir 190 

ACE 182 

AIA 181 

Alpha Chi Omega 238 

Alpha Epsilon Pi 246 

Alpha Gamma Delta 232 

Alpha Phi 236 

Alpha Phi Alpha 243 

Alpha Phi Omega 165 

Alpha Psi Omega 194 

Alpha Tau Omega 258 

Alpha Xi Delta 222 

American Chemical Society 174 

Angel Flight 186 

Arnold Air Society 186 

AWS 144 

Blue Key 157 

Cardinal Key 156 

Chestnut Burr 152 

Chi Omega 228 

Chi Sigma 275 

Christian Science 173 

Cleop Club 274 

Collegiates 266 

Delta Gamma 234 

Delta Omicron 159 

Delta Psi Kappa 180 

Delta Sigma Pi 276 

Delta Tau Delta 252 

Delta Upsilon 240 

Delta Zeta 225 

Dunbar Hall 210 

Eastern Orthodox 168 

Engleman Hall 206 

English Club 193 

Epsilon Pi Tau 161 



Flasherettes 1 96 

Gamma Delta 173 

Gamma Phi Beta 230 

Golden Eagles 187 

Golden K 164 

Hillel 172 

Home Economics Club 199 

HPE Club 180 

IFC 148 

Industrial Arts Club 175 

Inter-Hall Council 219 

Internationals 198 

IVCF 174 

Johnson Hall 216 

Kappa Alpha Psi 242 

Kappa Delta Pi 179 

Kappa Omicron Phi 158 

Kappa Phi 170 

Kappa Sigma 256 

Kent Stater 150 

Lake Hall 218 

Lowry Hall 202 

Madrigals 190 

Meddent Club 197 

Men's Glee Club 191 

Merrymen 189 

Moulton Hall 204 

MSA 146 

Newman Club 166 

Olson Hall 217 

Panel of Americans 163 

Panhellenic Council 149 

Pershing Rifles 184 

Phi Alpha Theta 161 

Phi Delta Theta 268 

Phi Epsilon Kappa 162 



Phi Gamma Delta 270 

Phi Kappa Tau 248 

Phi Kappa Theta 250 

Phi Sigma Kappa 254 

Pi Mu Epsilon 163 

Pi Omega Pi 159 

Pi Sigma Alpha 162 

Prentice Hall 212 

Public Affairs 154 

Rifle Club 195 

Sailing Club 196 

SAM ' 176 

Scabbard and Blade 188 

SEA 183 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 264 

Sigma Delta Chi 160 

Sigma Nu 244 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 260 

Sigma Theta Epsilon 171 

Silver Eagles 187 

Social Committee 142 

Stopher Hall 215 

Student Council 140 

Tau Beta Sigma ^ 158 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 272 

Terrace Hall 207 

Theta Chi 262 

Theta Sigma Phi 160 

Ukrainian Club 197 

University Theatre 194 

Verder Hall 214 

Wesley Foundation 169 

WKSU-FM 155 

Women's Chorus 191 

WRA 192 



Faculty Index 



Anthony, Donald E 133 

Anthony, Mark 131, 198 

Atkinson, Charles 24 

Bailey, James 219 

Barbe, Walter 25 

Barnes. Sherman B 25 

Baur, Frederick 23 

Beer, Ronald 131 

Berg, Emil 23 

Bergeon, Catherina 131 

Brailey, Lester 24 

Bunn, John 23 

Christopher, Henry 25 

Cowperthwaite, Leroy 132 

Coutt, John T 133 

Dubetz, Michael 168 

Forsythe, Margaret 131 

Golding, Lawrence 162 

Hansmeier, Thomas 131 

Hartzell, Ralph E 191 

Harvev, Virginia 180 

Head, Fred 24 

Hill, Robert 133 

Hodgkins, Jordan A 25 

Hudson, Hersel 133 

Ible, Oscar 162 

Kamerick, John 132 

Keiser, Marjorie 132 

Kelley, Kenneth 197 

Linnard, Martha 24 

Lewis, Elizabeth 133 

Makinson, Alice 23 

Martin, Harold 133 

McCormick, Edgar L 193 

Morbito, Joseph 17, 25, 132 

Morrow, Robert 25 

Mulvihill, Donald F 133 

Nicholson, John B 25 



Novotny, Elmer 13i: 

Nygreen, Glen 130 

Roskens, Ronald 84, 131 

Rotzel, Richard 24 

Sanders, Rena 131 

Saneholtz, Betty J 199 

Shennan, Muriel 131 

Smith, Edwin 219 

Soltis, Charles 133 

Stillings, F. S 132, 191 

Taylor, William 25, 132 

Tischendorf, Elbert 132 

Todd, Leslie 174 

Wenger, Roy E 25 

Wheeler, Louise H 177 

White, Robert 28 

Zucchero, William H 194 



Photo Credits 

Laird Brown 

3, 105, 151, 268, 269 

Edward Dickau 

4, 24, 26, 67, 68, 69, 84, 97, 98, 

101, 147, 166, 167, 200, 207, 217 

Antanas Jucaitis 
51, 52, 57, 78, 84, 86, 90, 91, 93, 
95, 98, 99, 100, 109, 112, 118, 
129, 135, 147, 150, 151, 152, 153, 
154, 155,201, 214,216, 226,232, 
233, 248, 258, 272, 332 
Paul Knittel 
25,27, 36, 37,40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 
45, 48, 49, 50, 55, 56, 58, 59, 71, 
79, 82, 83, 88, 89, 91, 95, 96, 
115, 119, 122, 123, 125, 141, 150. 
152, 153, 189, 192, 215, 222, 224, 



230, 235, 248, 249, 251, 332 

Charles Roche 

6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 17, 23, 26 

27, 28, 29, 31, 48, 50, 51, 52, 53 

55, 63, 65, 66, 70, 76, 84, 85, 86 

87, 89, 115, 134, 136, 137, 138 

139, 144, 150, 152, 164, 195, 202 

203, 204, 205, 206, 208, 209, 211 

237, 264, 274 

John Roszkowski 

23, 24, 30, 50, 51, 52, 54, 57, 58, 

60, 64, 72, 73, 77, 78, 86, 92, 93, 

94, 95, 101, 102, 103, 110, 114, 

116, 117, 120, 121, 128, 130, 

131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 149, 153, 

154, 155, 212, 219, 222, 224, 227, 

231, 243, 254, 257, 258, 260, 261, 

262, 264, 270, 273, 332 

Jeanette Substanley 

75, 102, 103, 143, 200, 204 

Thomas Suchan 

51, 52, 53, 91, 126, 135, 142, 

147. 213, 227, 228, 234, 237, 

240, 242, 243, 247, 254, 256, 261, 

262 

Alan Zelina 

10, 61, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 

109, 110, 111, 124, 131 

COLOR CREDITS 

Paul Knittel 

11, 25, 47 

Charles Roche 

1, 10, 14, 15, 18,21, 47 

John Roszkowski 

2, 14, 16, 19, 25, 46 

Tom Suchan 

25 



Student Index 



Abdallah, Ahmad 189 

Achenbach, Janice 223 

Abdolrasouli, Soleman .... 198 
Adams. Bonnie ..182. 196, 2(18 

Adair, Karen 193 

Addis, Anne 183, 193 

Allele, Antoine 198 

.Adrian, Erica 214 

Aganko. Richard 217 

Agarand, .Anita 159 

Aguila, Frank 244 

Ahem, Larry 176, 24") 

Aicher, Mike 21.") 

Alba. Carolyn 193 

Albertson, Dee 145, 208 

Albertson, De.Anne 233 

Albright, Jav 170 

Aldad, Hiishang 198 

Alexander, Christine .183, 193 

Alexander, Lee 176 

Allen, Clyde 242 

Allen, Jane 230 

AUcnsworth, John 261 

Almond, Bill 170 

Amatangclo, Lino 194 

Amato, Paula 184, 223 

Ambrose, Dee 210, 229 

Anient, Beth 143, 238 

Anient, Darrell 162 

Anicrsback, Carole 196 

Aniick, Marion 163 

AmirParvis, AH 252 

Anima, Rose 233 

Anderson, Lois 182 

Anderson, Raymond 262 

Anderson. .Siinda 183 

Anderson, ^Villiam 245 

Andrew. Jeff 245 

.Andrews, James 262 

.Angle, James 146, 24H 

.Anderson, Lois 196 

Androvic, Richard 215 

Apcl, Randy 218 

.Appel, Robert 161 

Arliippainen, Laila 198 

.Armstrong, Charles 218 

Arner, Stanley 143 

Arnold, Dennis 264 

Aronoff, Jason 217 

Ashton, Jeffrey 264 

Astbury, Diana 238 

.Atwood, James 194. 281 

Aublc, Alan 252 

.Aiichlcr, .Sanndra 281 

.■\iiman, James 281 

.Auning, Helen 197, 2RI 

Averv. J. C 149 

A\rcs, Ann 194, 281 

B 

Babiak, Robert 264 

Babinchak, Sandy. 140, 214, 230 

Bachna, Rudy 162, 281 

Ba<lcr, Robert 258 

Bailey, Corey 264 

Bailcv. Darla 281 

Bailey, Louise. .. 192, 196. 225 

Bailey, James 218 

Baker. Carol Ann 193 

Baker, Darlene 233,281 

Baker, John 195 

Baker, Roger 281 

Baldauf, Esther 198, 281 

Ball, Barbara 186, 229 

Ball, Norma 183, 281 

Ballanre. Bunny 194 

Balinski. Robert 176 

Balint, John 181 

Balson, Robert 262 

Baldwin. Jon 240 



Banghart. Gerald 189 

Banser, ^ViUiam 245 

Baranv, Edith 210 

Bardall, Earl 281 

Barkhurst, Nancy 149, 178, 

225, 281 

Barilla. Gerald 258. 281 

Barlow, Barbara 183 

Barnes, Barbara. . 182. 174. 281 

Barnes, Richard 218 

Barnes, Susan 281 

Barnett, Eleanor 281 

Barnett, Marcia 213 

Barnett, Sandra 281 

Barnette. Joseph 255, 281 

Barnhousc, Charles 269 

Barrcs, Bob 148, 269 

Barrett, Carol 182, 230 

Bartclme. George 264 

Bartholomew. Edwin 189 

Bartlett. Phillip 281 

Bartley. Mona 281 

Barto. Thomas 176 

Barton. Carol 281 

Barton. Richard 269 

Baron. Ken 217 

Baschart. Richard 194 

Bates. Bob 140 

Basinski. Barb 214, 281 

Bassetti, Judy . . .186, 223, 281 

Bast, Joseph' 281 

Bateman. Daryl 258 

Bates. Miriam 173 

Battaglia, Sylvia 214 

Battenberg. Thomas 258 

Battes, Leda 282 

Bau, Peter 273, 282 

Bauer, Klaus 196, 267 

Bauer, Samuel 282 

Baughman. Forest 255 

Baugliman. Kathleen 282 

Baxter, James 282 

Bazen, Angela 186, 237 

Bazzone, Barbara 197 

Beach, Gary 273 

Beal, Carol 229. 282 

Beal. Donald 245 

Beals, William 269 

Beauregard, Karen 229 

Bcchberger, Robert 173 

Becher, Nancy 282 

Bechtel, Bruce... 186, 189, 282 

Bechtold, Elizabeth 282 

Becka, Kathleen 282 

Bcckman, Judith 182. 282 

Beebe. Bruce 217 

Bees. Katherine 282 

Beickosh, Mary 180 

Beidle, Helen 209 

Belak, Ron 215 

Belden, Earl 255, 282 

Bell, Carolyn 159 

Bell, Joyce 170 

Bellan. Carol 229 

Bemba, Daniel 198 

Bender, David 257 

Bender, Janice 196 

Bendix, Karen 223 

Benedetti, Donna 223 

Benesh, Rosemary 180, 282 

Benjamin, Nancy 282 

Benjamin, Robert 246 

Bennekamper, Neil 282 

Benner, Andrea 282 

Bennett, Gwendolyn. . 183. 186. 
281 

Bennett, Robert 245 

Bennett, Chuck 240 

Benya, Mike 282 

Benyo, Nicholas 264, 282 

Bergstrom, Lilly 230 

Bernabei, John 194 

Bernard, Don 217, 219 

Bernardinell. Richard ....282 



Bernhart, Jay 218 

Berry, Al 240 

Berry, Carol 283 

Berson, Edith 283 

Bertram, Deanna 210 

Bessick, Joan .... 144, 145, 149, 

1.56, 234 

Bcthea, Philip 248 

Beutel, Nancy 230 

Bezdek, John 269 

Bianchi, John 283 

Bickel, Peter 240 

Biddlestone, Joyce 237 

Bierbaum, Gretchen 152, 

193, 225 

Bierwirth, Nancy 238 

Biggs, Charles 283 

Bigier, Carole 230 

Biiin, Paul 283 

Bilek. Donna 283 

Billctt. Carol 223 

Billingslcc. Robert 242 

Biltz, Lawrence 240 

Bingham. Ralph 277 

Bingman. Frances .... 180. 192 
Birch. Julie 145. 156. 

164. 234 

Biros. J. W 191 

Bischoff. Barbara 238 

Bistline. Dick 187. 193 

Bittner. Gary ....183,193,215 

Bixler. James 162 

Black. Eilyn 177 

Black. Robert 283 

Blarkhurn. Jim 218 

Blarkmore. John 283 

Blackstone. James 283 

Blair. Jack 146 

Blair. John 248 

Blakslee, Bette ...178. 194.283 

Blass. Dale 273 

Blavos. Doris. 168. 182. 214. 233 

Bliss. Howard 283 

Bloomfield. Michele 283 

Blue. Reggie 242 

Blumel. Robert 252 

Boarman, Marie. .180. 192. 283 

Bocci. Ravinond 245 

Bock. Marilvn 283 

Bodmann. Janice 182 

Boffa. Frank 257. 283 

Bogardus. Peter 283 

Bogovich. .Anthonv 283 

Bohnenstengcl. Fred 176 

Boland. Thomas 184 

Boll. Dale 266 

Bollard. Jean 213 

Ilfillinger. Sharon 283 

Bond. Judy.. 140. 156. 237. 283 

Boodv. Robert 277 

Booth. Kathleen 173 

Borallv. Frank 250 

Borchik. Diane. 182. 183. 213. 
230 

Borden. Priscilla 193, 195 

Borden, Thomas 264 

Borger, Donna 208 

Born, Elizabeth.. 140, 156, 179, 
183, 205, 283 

Boron, John 275 

Boros. Elizabeth 283 

Boischel. Frank.. 165. 174. 215 

Boston. Rand 191, 245 

Boylcs, Carol 199. 158 

Bowles. Billy 245 

Bowman. David 188, 283 

Bevies, Carol 283 

Brachna, Gabor 257, 283 

Bradshaw, Charles 283 

Bradshaw, Duard 248 

Brandes, Lynnc 182. 283 

Brandt. Thomas 261 

Bransky. Stanley 284 

Braun, John 181 



Braun. Marianne 238 

Brav, Richard 177 

Brcinke, Bob 181 

Breniser, Margaret 284 

Brenner, Thomas 284 

Brezovic, Richard 284 

Breul, Linus 174 

Brewer. Brenda 209 

Brewer. Douglas 255 

Brewster. Kerri 174 

Brczine. Jerry 166 

Briese. Joseph 248 

Brinkerhoff. Betty 177 

Brinkerhotf. Linda .186, 193 

Brinzo, John 250 

Brislen, Pamela 208 

Brodskv, Sheldon 172, 246 

Broer, Paul 248 

Bromm, Lynne ..182, 183, 196 

Bronczek, Jo.Ann 225 

Brookover, Sharon 208 

Brott, Don 284 

Brower, Wayne 163 

Brown, Charles 262 

Brown, David 240 

Brown, Donna 195 

Brown, Frank 173 

Brown, Frederick 187 

Brown, Gene 193 

Brown, Iris 209, 284 

Brown, James 261 

Brown, James D 184 

Brown, John 240 

Brown, Laird 284 

Brown, Larry 162, 284 

Brown, Marianne 193 

Brown, Marion 284 

Brown. Mary 284 

Brown. Matthew 216, 284 

Brown, Pamela 234 

Brown, Peter 189 

Brown, Richard 284 

Brown, Robert 177 

Brown, Tobie 284 

Brown. William 242, 284 

Brownell, Peggy 234 

Browske. Richard 284 

Bruck. Jacqueline 182. 284 

Brugcss. Particia 225 

Brugger. Ronald 284 

Brulin. George 163 

Brumage. Stephanie 208 

Briuidic. Judy 228. 284 

Bruno. Frank 285 

Brunst. Cara 214. 237 

Brunt. Sue 171. 196 

Brutte. Edward 193 

Bryan. Gerald 285 

Bryan. James 248 

Bryan, Sally 171, 182 

Bryan, Sara 285 

Bucey, John 258, 285 

Buchko, John 285 

Buchman, Aaron 285 

Buckey, Daniel 264 

Buddie, James 240 

Budziak, Barbara 285 

Bulgrin, Brenda 285 

Bulkowski. Jolenc 238, 285 

Bullock, James 285 

Bunker, Ronald 285 

Bunting, Virginia 223, 285 

Burch. Janet 208 

Burch. Norman 285 

Burchett, William 187 

Burger. Dale 285 

Burger. Marlene 183, 285 ' 

Burgess, Patricia .142, 156, 285 

Burke, Jean 237 

Burnard, Mary 171 

Burnham, John 285 

Burnett, Gary 148, 175 

Burnett, M. M 191, 285 

Burns, Robert 245 



Burrell, Joyce... 156, 163. 180. 
225, 285 

Burrow, Tom 181 

Burson, Ro.semary 285 

Burtner, Donna 285 

Burton. Alan 187 

BuTvis, Gunta 285 

Bushanic, Sharon 285 

Bushman, Frank 215 

Busta, Tom 218 

Butler, Andy 198 

Butler, Benjamin 285 

Butler, Bob 198 

Butler, Dawne 186 

Butler, James 269 

Buz'.elli, Cindy 229 



Cackowski, Paul 187 

Caesar, Marv 285 

Cain, Frank 240 

Cairns, Judy 159, 205 

Cairns, Mary 285 

Callahan, Marti 196 

Callahan, Sally 285 

Calland, Max 262 

Callas, JoAnn 223 

Cameron, Robert 162, 285 

Caiup, George 162. 285 

Campana, John 215 

Campbell. Barbara . . .182, 285 

Campbell, Clayton 261 

Campbell, Linda 225 

Campbell. Ross 286 

Canfield, Betsy 196, 225 

Canning, Carolyn 238 

Cannon, Lowell 163 

Canon, Joan 233 

Cantrell, Bonnie 173 

Capel, Pattc 194 

Capponi, Mary 286 

Capra, Marion 182, 225 

Carey, John 267 

Carl, James 262 

Carl, Judy 174, 183 

Carlson, Britta 196 

Carlson, Nancy 286 

Carnahan, Bob 170 

Carnes, Sandra 286 

Carnicom, Gary.. 188, 257, 286 

Carpenter, Paul 252 

Carr. David 248 

Carr, David 286 

Carrier, Roger 286 

Carroll, Joyce 163 

Carson, Mark 174 

Carter, Edward 286 

Carter, Mike 218 

Carter, Susie 140, 206 

Casagrande, Joseph 250 

Casey, Bob 140, 141, 286 

Castle, Paul 286 

Cauvet, Jane 230 

Cebulski, Jim ...216, 219, 186 
Cedervall, Patricia . . .182, 183. 

286 

Cecconi, Adele 286 

Centa, Ronald 264 

Cermak, Pat 171 

Cernigoj, Hank 245 

Ceroky, Virginia 158, 213 

Cerato, Patricia 286 

Cetto, William 245 

Chamberlain, Noel . . .252, 286 

Chambers, Dora 169, 171 

Chambers, Russ 264 

Chambers, William 269 

Chapman, Melinda 163 

Charvat, William ....181, 258 

Cheeks, Paul 163 

Chenot, Patricia 206 

Chinn, Betty 186 

Chippi, Joseph 286 

Chiramonte, Eileen 193 

Chisholm, Glenda . . . 158, 234, 

286 

Cicora, Wilma 286 

Cinco, Frances 286 



Ciptak. Robert 286 

Chitea. Anthony 240 

Chmielewski, Jace 218 

Chojnow.ski, Larry 248 

Christ, Pete 265 

Christopher, Carl 250 

Christos, Anastasia 168 

Chunat. Gerald 186 

Cianciolo, Charles 245 

Cika, Charlotte 159 

Cindrich, Mary 205 

Cinkle, Carol 229 

Cironi, Linda 238 

Clairmont, Alban 198 

Clark, Jim 269 

Clark, Marty 199 

Clark, Ron 217, 241 

Clark, Sandy 173, 205 

Clark, Keith 174 

Class, Janet 183 

Clatterbuck, David 286 

Clay, Linda 206 

Clem, Sandy 202 

Clement, Geri....l45, 213, 237 

Climaco, John 258 

Cline, Ruth 238, 286 

Clunk, Margery 287 

Clutterbuck, Gretchen. 177, 287 

Clyne. Patrick 196 

Coblitz, Helenc 163 

Cody, George ...157, 250, 287 

Coe, Lawrence 191, 246 

Coffield, Patrick 187 

Cogan, Carol 210 

Cogan, John 287 

Cohen, Eli 287 

Cohen, Neil 148 

Cole, Charles 163, 215 

Cole, Jim 169, 170 

Cole, Rebecca 237 

Cole, Sandra 230 

Colligan, James. . .186, 187, 269 

Collins, Bruce 194, 287 

Collins, James 166, 189 

Colonna, Carolyn 287 

Coltman, Mary ' 174 

Compton. James 173 

Cone, Joyce 287 

Congdon, Ruth 287 

Conley, Kay 287 

Connell, Arthur 258, 287 

Conners, Rosemary 287 

Connor, William 287 

Conomos, Magdaline .194.229. 
287 

Conrad, Judith 195 

Conti, Elizabeth 229 

Conti, Jo Anne 287 

Cook, Blair 252 

Cook, Richard 241, 287 

Cook, Sue 171 

Cooper, Linda 238 

Cooper, Lucile...l74, 196, 182 

Cope, Douglas 163, 287 

Corbett, Barbara 183 

Cordell, John 215 

Corley, Terry 194 

Corpe, Roy 170 

Corsaro, John 219 

Corsello, Curtiss 273 

Cortese, Cathleen ....210, 234 

Coughlin, Kathleen 287 

Coulter, Karen 223 

Coup, John 193, 218 

Cover, Janet 287 

Cox, Nancy 199, 287 

Crabbs, Judith 206, 287 

Cracraft, Judi 196 

Craig. Howard 176 

Craine, Carl 250, 287 

Cramer, Ron 173 

Crausaz, Winston 193 

Graver, Dorothy. . 179, 183, 287 

Crawford, Lee 265, 287 

Crawford. Phyllis ....198, 208 
Crawford, Thomas . . .265, 287 

Craycraft, Dannie 261 

Creamer, Wayne 262 

Crelli, Sandy 199 

Crihfield, Deronda -...183 



Crile, Sandra 288 

Critchfield, Jane 205. 288 

Croce, Eileen 208 

Crossen, Stacy 196 

Crouch, Helen 186, 237 

Crozier, Suzanne 288 

Cowan, Connie 195 

Cullen, Tarey 273 

Gulp. David 261 

Cummings, Michael 267 

Cummins. Kenneth 163 

Cunningham. Mary 288 

Curley.Rav 184 

Currie, Carol '. . .210 

Curry, Deward 252 

Curtin, John 146, 248 

Curtis, Clifford 163 

Cvgan, Robert 250 

Czar, John 184, 250 

Czayka, Rose Ellen 288 

D 

Dado, Carole 166, 182 

Daley, Donald 269 

Daniels, James 277 

Dallmann, Ruth 173 

Daly, Nancy 288 

Damerow, Gerald 265 

D'Amico, Carol 196 

Daniels, James 176, 288 

Daniels. Joan 158, 288 

Daniels, Michael 248 

Danko, Christine. 177. 223. 288 
Dannes. Annamae .... 149, 288 

Dante, Susan 234 

Danzey, Barbara 193 

Daranius, Thomas 241 

Darby, Leslie 196 

Darby, Raymond 288 

Datish, Mary 288 

Dauber, Martha 238 

Daugherty, Margaret 223 

D'Aurora, Joseph 258 

Davenport, Bunny ...229, 288 

Davidson, Thomas 252 

Davis, Donald 261 

Davis, Larry 248 

Davis, Ruth 171 

Davis, Terry 179, 288 

Daugherty, Peg 193 

Dawes, Nancy 159, 177, 

196, 288 

Day, Kenneth 288 

Deames, Bill 146, 215 

Dean, Karen 182, 288 

DeAngelo, Sam 176, 277 

Debuvitz, Gary 288 

Deckert, Herbert 194, 288 

DeForest, Judy 173 

Deibel, Ronald 195 

Deiger, Fred 187 

Deimling, Paul 241 

DelBane, Larry 148, 245 

DelGrosso, George 288 

Delter, Gary 175 

DeMarco, Robert 189 

Dencer, R. B 191 

Denes, James 183, 215 

Denirio, Paul 288 

Denman, Jan 193 

Dennis, Nancy 208 

Denniston, Robert 262 

Dent, Norman 184 

Derigo, Linda 289 

DeRoche, Carole 289 

Derrick, Judith 192 

Derus, Pat 210 

DeSantis, Diana 208, 289 

Desmone, John 188, 289 

DeVille, Edward 258, 289 

DeWeese, Lewis 184, 245 

Dewey, Joan 186 

Dianiska, Steve 195 

Dible, Jim 166 

DiCinto, John 289 

Dickerson, Judith 289 

DiCola, Leo 289 

DiCorpo, Dianne 166 



Diem, Nauyen Xnan 198 

Diruscio, Joseph 289 

Disberger, George 176, 289 

Disbro, William 289 

Discenzo, Donald. 176, 241, 289 

Diser, Stephen 263 

Dittrich, Frank 197, 289 

Dixon, Daniel . . .188, 2,59, 289 

Dod, Robert 170 

Dodson, Laurel 289 

Doerrer, Dorothy 183, 193 

Doleski, Theodora . . .158, 166, 
210, 289 

Doll, T. Everett 188, 289 

Domjan, Lou 289 

Donaldson, Janet 182 

Donay. Don 259 

Donecker, Kay 237 

Donnellan, P. J 191 

Donnelly, Michael ... .263, 289 

D'Onofrio, Darlene 196 

D'Onofrio, Mario 289 

Donovan, Colleen 196 

Donovan, Gary 195 

Donoghue, Jerry 277 

Dornbush, Joe' 140 

Dornbush, Robert 218, 219 

Doslak, John 250 

Douglas, Daley 269 

Dours, Eugene 289 

Dours, Kathryn 289 

Doutt, Arthur 218 

Doverspike, William 289 

Downing, Kathleen 140 

Downs. Michael 184 

Dragash, John 181 

Drage, John 255 

Drasler, Phyllis. .186, 230. 289 

Dreher. Richard 177, 187 

Dria. Frances 158, 199 

Drotos, John 187 

Drouhard, Donald . . .165, 216, 
289 

Drullard, John 143, 257 

Drullard, Linda 237 

DuBey, Nancy 182 

DuBro, Gary 263 

Duda, David 289 

Duda, Janet. 145, 173, 183, 213 

Dudley, Marjorey 195 

Dunckel, Roy 241 

Dunlap, Judy 193, 213 

Dunnick, Richard 261 

Dunning, Ann 181 

DuPriest, Anne 206 

Durst, Carl 290 

Durst, David 252 

Dylag, Joseph 290 

Dwyer, William 187 

Dylag, Joseph 176 



Earnest, Don 259 

Earley, Marilyn 290 

Eaton, Richard 176 

Eaton, Tom 275 

Ebaka, Abraham 198 

Ebbert, Carol ...158, 171, 199 

Ebbert, Larry 170 

Ecrement, Eugene 195 

Edgerton, Joyce.. 158, 171, 199 

Edman, Nancy 238, 290 

Edmonds, Carol 290 

Edmonds, Dianne 196 

Edmunds, Carol 140, 208 

Edwards, Carole 208 

Edwards, Dave 193 

Eger, Larry 275 

Ehlen, Judith 290 

Ehlke, Richard 290 

Ehrbar, Annette 210 

Ehrhart, Donald 290 

Eichner, Robert 290 

Eisenhut, Herbert 263 

Eisraon, James 249, 290 

Elba, Clyde 242 

Elia, David 249, 290 

Elias, Barbara 233, 290 



Eliner, Frank 181 

Elliott, David 290 

Elliott, Larry 189 

Elliott, Martha ..145, 202, 290 

Elliott. Sue 171, 183 

Ellis, Bertha 198 

Ellis, Louise 290 

Ells, Lee 291 

Elser, Patricia 193 

Emch, Ron 148, 269, 291 

Emerson, Jim 217, 241 

Emons, Jeanne 183 

Engle. Lynda 182, 291 

Ensinger. Milton 263 

Epstein, Barrv 246 

Ericson, Carol . . . 179, 237, 291 

Erkkila, Gilbert 291 

Ervin. Joyce 193 

Eshlen, Helen 199, 238 

Espelage, Penny 196. 213 

Estep, Scottie . 206 

Evano, Janice 291 

Evans, Carol 238 

Evans, Judy 196, 229 

Evans. Richard 176, 259 

Evershed, Diane 186, 234 

Everson, David 263 

Ewing, Carolyn. . . 149. 229. 291 



Fabri. Jack 241 

Fagcrt. Charles 186. 263 

Fagert. Xancv 171 

Fails. Donna 193 

Fails. Sharon ..> 182 

Fair. Gary 175 

Fanchcr. Jane 238 

Farquhar. Roberta 194 

Farina, Jean 291 

Farinacci, .Allen 241 

Farrcll. Elaine ..193. 196. 209 

Farris. David 197 

Fasick, fohn 186 

Fay. Mike 216 

Featheringham, Tom 263 

Federevich. Anne 195 

Fedoroivvcz, Tania ...197, 291 

Feinberg, Steven 246 

Felch, Bill 218 

Fellouzis, Carrie 198 

Felt, 'Walter 245 

Fenley, Barbara 229, 291 

Fenn. Raymond 194 

Fcola, Dennis 277 

Ferguson, Lvnn 291 

Fernandez, Manuel . . .241, 291 

Fernilla, Mike 180 

Ferrell. William 291 

Ferry, William 291 

Fichard, Marggie 180 

Fichter, Les 273 

Ficzner, Robert 250 

Fiedler, Lee 142, 250, 291 

Fields, Ernest 242 

Ficrman, Lee 291 

Fink, Cathv 291 

Finkel, Judith 158, 291 

Finley, Bobbi 174 

FioRino, Xancy . . 182. 213, 291 
Fisher, Connie ..149, 234, 291 

Fisher, Donna 170 

Fisher, Janice 158 

Fisher, Richard 181 

Flack, Richard ..176, 277, 291 

Flack, Sanford 246 

Flak, Gerald 291 

Flaherty, Patrick 250 

Fiasco, John 291 

Fleeter, Norman 291 

Fleischer, Janet 199 

Fletcher, Kay 229, 291 

Flignor, Carole 291 

Flood. John 249 

Flood. Tim 241 

Florian, James 265, 291 

Flynn, James 291 

Folty, Thomas 291 

Forbes, Barbara ] 82 



Ford, Robert 292 

Forestal, Thomas 255 

Foreman, Dave 184, 252 

Foreman, Maureen 210 

Forgue, Mary 195 

Forrest, Patricia. . 183, 229. 292 

Forshey, Jack 265 

Foskie, Carole 182 

Foster. Louise 158, 292 

Fowler, Diane 209 

Fowler, Donald 177 

Fox, Beverly 234 

Fox, Eunice 149, 237 

Fox, Ralph 292 

Frame, Mary 170 

France. Ronald 292 

Francis, James 187 

Frankie, Joseph 292 

Eraser, Barbara. . 158. 177. 292 

Frater. Carole 292 

Fratiani, Fred 177 

Frazzini, Syl 184 

Freas, Carolyn 233, 292 

Frease, Gail 186, 223 

Freeman, David 292 

Freeman, Mark 263 

Freshwater, Lois 196 

Frey. .Anne 292 

Frick, John 174 

Friedel, David 174, 246 

Friedman, Francine 291 

Fries, Theresa 208 

Fristoe. Jack 142, 148. 157. 

252, 292 

Frost, Don 217 

Frye. Pat 205 

Fulk, Norma 292 

Fuller, Cam 169, 171, 183 

Fuller, Jacquelyn 223 

Fuller, janis 292 

Fur, Maria 197, 292 

Furev, Donald 174 

Furev. Robert 163, 174, 

188, 292 



Gabcl, Roberta 160, 292 

Gabcrt, Janet 170 

Gable, Bill 191, 193 

Gainar, Kenneth 241 

Galambossv, Lynn 292 

Galberaith! Ric 218 

Galitsky, Ronald 176, 292 

Gall, Sue 182 

Gallagher, Sherry 225 

Gallatin, Noreen. .145, 149, 237 

Gallo, Jean 229 

Galloway, Judy 174, 292 

Gambaccini, John 277 

Gambatese, Claire ...182, 230 

Ganim, Gary 143, 350 

Gareau, Michael 292 

Garland, Barbara . . . .174, 182, 
206, 293 

Garrett, Linda 206 

Garrison, Dee 293 

Gaskell, William 187 

Gaston, Carrie 223 

Gates, Richard 293 

Gause, Mary 199 

Gautcher, Eileen 213 

Gawryszewski, Ronald ....248 
Gaydar, Barbara. 166, 182, 293 

Gaylord, Virginia 293 

Geib, Thomas 275 

Geitz, Kaylene 173 

Gelatka, William 241 

Gennett, Susan 140 

Gentry, Eloise 193, 205 

George, John 293 

George, Ray 181, 293 

Gerber, Diane 183, 293 

Germana, Richard 189 

Gesche, Jerry 195 

Gcrstcnberger, Gilbert . . . .273 

Gibbons, Judith 293 

Gib.son, Ann 234 

Gibson, Diana 293 



C;ibson, Mary 225 

Gibson. Raymond 293 

Gibson, Samuel 259 

Giffin, Frances 199, 293 

C;ilbert, Louis 259 

C;i!bert, Sanford 246 

Gilberti, Louis 181 

Gilbo, Ole 241 

Gildzen, Al 193 

Gilger, Becky 170 

Gilida, Marilyn 140, 145, 

225, 293 

Gill, Harry 255 

Gill, Judy 194, 293 

Gill, T. R 191 

Gillman, Jack 189 

Gilmore, Eugene 265 

Gilmore, Judy 183 

Giltz, Byron 245, 293 

Ginnegaw, Larry 265 

Ginsberg, Melvin 246 

Girsch, Mary 238, 293 

Glaser, Jon 293 

Glass. Marilyn 293 

Glanzer, Gail 223 

Glavic, James 259, 293 

Glover, Sandy 229, 293 

Glovka. Gerald 170, 277 

Godfrey, Christine 193 

Godfrey, Richard 245 

Godlewski, Robert 293 

Goekjian, Mary 293 

Golstcin, Francine 182, 293 

Golenski, Richard 263 

Golombuski, Michael 277 

Gombac, James 293 

Gonczy, James 293 

Gonda, Pat 210 

Gonder, Marilyn 293 

Goodhart, Janice 182 

Goodman, Bob 216. 241 

Goodman, Nancy 202 

Goodspeed, Joyce 230, 294 

Gorczyca, Don 187 

Gordon, Bonita ..182. 183. 208 

Gordon, Gale 294 

Gordon, Ralph 266 

Gordos, William 294 

Gorence, Elaine 228, 294 

Gorretta, Paula 193 

Gougler, Marlene 294 

Gozur, Kenneth 245 

Graban, Sandra 294 

Grabill, Marlene 294 

Grabner, Warren 261, 294 

Grahain. Ray 181 

Graham, Lawrence 267 

Graham, Susan 294 

Grandin, Paul 252 

Granville, Kenneth. .. 191, 275 

Gratis, Michelle 158, 1,59 

Grau, Linda 294 

Graves, John 197 

Gray, Donald 261, 294 

Gray, Linda 233 

Green, Eileen 294 

Green, Jerry 162, 294 

Green, Rebecca 294 

Green, Virginia 182, 294 

Green, William 162, 294 

Greenlese, Sherie 294 

Greincr, Rickie 173 

Gress. Glen 259 

Greve, Jonathan 174 

Grier, Barry 242 

Griffith, Jean 213 

Griffeth, Martha 196 

Griffiths, Margaret 294 

Grills, Barbara 156, 178, 

180, 192,237, 294 

Grills, Norma 237 

Grimm, Barbara 225 

Grisak, Marie 168 

Grissom, Jack 294 

Gromcn, Laureen 295 

Grootegoed, Russ ....184, 191 

Gross, Roberta 213 

Grubbe, Patricia 225, 295 

Gruber, Gay 186 

Gonder, Marilyn 171 



Gould, Sandra 196 

Grills, Norma 199 

Gruitza, John 181, 265 

Guentzler, William 175 

Guest, Daniel 146, 241 

Guest, Janice 170, 158 

Guinta, Sandra 196 

Guisinger, Joan 213, 223 

Gusbar, Robert 245 

Gustafson, Nancy ....196, 229 

Gustin, Gail 225 

Gysler, Louis 175 

H 

Haapanen, Lorna 295 

Haas, Thomas 295 

Habenschuss, Michael .... 163 

Hackenson, Jack 259 

Hacker, Lillian 149, 230 

Hadden, Roy 169, 176, 

188, 295 

Hadinger, Paul 295 

Hadley, Janet 230, 295 

Hagen, Dennis 170 

Hagmeyer, Robert. . . .176, 277 

Hahn, Kenneth 275 

Hajduk, Stephanie 182 

Hajek, Robert 277 

Hale, Marjorie 295 

Hale, Sue 158, 234 

Haley, John 261 

Haley, R. E 191 

Hall. Janet 225 

Hall. Patricia 199 

Halstead. Mike 216 

Halter, Eileen 229, 295 

Hamad, Richard 250 

Hamilton, Linda 180, 295 

Hamm, Norman 295 

Hamin, Sandra 199 

Hammer, Katie 225 

Hampton, J. W 191, 295 

Hanchulak, Elaine 295 

Handler. Gary 295 

Hanks, Richard 273 

Hanna, Nancy 230 

Hanna, Sandy . . . 145, 234, 295 

Hannan, Samuel 177 

Hannay, Gerald.. 174, 218, 295 

Hansen, David 295 

Hansrote, Carol 295 

Harding, Anne... 171, 183. 206 

Harding, Nancy 237 

Hardisty, Charles 295 

Hardman, Lana 295 

Harper, Brooke 210 

Harris, Carlyle 195 

Harris, David 181, 295 j 

Harris, George 2,59 

Harris, Jerry 140, 218, 295 

Harris, Judith 235 

Harris, Marguerite 179 

Harris, Robert 295 

Harris, Roxy 163 

Harrison, Marion 175 

Harrison, Robert 243 

Harry, Betty 295 

Hart, Roger 165, 187 

Hartman, Albert 277 

Hartzcll, Edgar 295 

Harvey, Reed 142, 146, 

170, 176, 295 

Hasenstab, Emil 269 

Haskell, Joyce 296 

Has.son, Barry 246 

Hastings, .Ann 296 

Hatch, Barbara 196 

Hatch, Gene 161 

Hathaway, Jeffrey 249 

Hathaway, Kenneth 296 

Hausmeier, Thomas 146 

Havas, William 188, 269, 

296 

Havren, Julia 193 

Hawk, Shirley 158, 1.59 

Hawkins. Betty 296 

Hawkins. Homer 242 

Hawkins, Linda 235 



Hawkings, William ..148, 217 

Hayden, Anne 296 

Hayes, James 188 

Hays, Linda 296 

Head. Al 217,219,243 

Heberling, Brian ...249, 296 

Heck, Shirley 213 

Heckman, Fred 296 

Hecky, Larry 296 

Hedden, Linda 144, 145, 

156, 161, 178, 296 
Heestand, Pat ...183, 193, 196 

Heichel, Lynn 196 

Heidy, Donna 182, 206 

Heilman, Mark ..173, 186, 187 

Heinz, Thomas 259, 296 

Held, Rhonda 205 

Helm, Linda 296 

Hemdel, Debbie 235 

Hencshel, David 296 

Henderson, Charles 263 

Henderson, Marilyn ..183,296 

Hendricks, Linda 296 

Henkel, Barbara 193 

Henkin, Phvllis 214 

Henneges. Elaine 196 

Heppert, Marlene ...145, 182, 
223 

Herbert, Sandy 182 

Herig, Russell ..177, 186, 296 

Hesselbarf, Willard 245 

Hiblcr, Ed 217, 277 

Hickerson, Jerry 162, 170, 

174, 296 
Hildebrandt. Joan . . . 149, 235 
Hill, Susan . . 163, 183, 238, 297 

Hill, Thelma 149 

Hillard, Hank 165 

Hilliard, Marilyn. 183, 192, 297 

Hilson, Hal 249 

Himes, Linda 297 

Hinks, Tom 163 

Hird, Janet 297 

Hirke, Ronald 174 

Hirsch, Edmund ....273, 297 

Hirsch, Joan 297 

Hirschfield, Susan 158 

Hladik, Arlene 171, 208 

Hobart, John 181 

Hochheiser, Joyce 297 

Hocking, Heather 173 

Hodkey, Leon 261 

Hofer, Paul 297 

Hofer, Paul 216 

Hoff, Charles 297 

Hoff, Darlene 213 

Hoffman, Bev 182 

Hoffman, Carl 218, 297 

Hoffman, William ...269, 297 
Hogue, DeRonda ....145, 193 
Hohenshil, Thomas ......297 

Holden, Elaine 182, 297 

Holdsworth, Marilyn 297 

Holecko, Dorothy 297 

Hollen, Donna ..161, 183, 297 

HoUenback, Gay 297 

HoUish, Pete 263 

Hollow, Richard 273 

Holskey, William 297 

Holt, Jerry 175 

Holt, Ted 218 

Holz, Ted 255 

Hoobler, James 269, 297 

Hook, John 249 

Hopkins, Michel 267 

Hopkins, Samuel 243, 297 

Horky, Karen 180, 297 

Hornyak, Michele 195 

Horvath, Marianne ..145, 214, 
297 

Hoskins, Lynn 210 

Hoste, Ida 205 

Hotchkiss, Kay 183, 238 

Hott, Jean 166 

Hott, Margaret 166 

Houchin, Dick 196 

Howe, Tony 174 

Howell, Dennis 258, 297 

Howie, Arthur 181, 215 



Hronek, Pete 245, 297 

Huber, Carolyn 297 

Hueffcd, Robert 297 

Huetter, Sandra 193 

Hufler, Carolyn 297 

Hughes, Charlotte ...182, 298 

Hughes, James 298 

Hughes, R. Frederick .... 194 
Hultin, James ..191, 249, 298 

Humel, Lad 277 

Huml, Barbara ..180, 196, 298 
Huml, Frank ...161, 175, 298 

Hunt, Diane 199 

Hunt, Harvey 243 

Hunter, Joyce 298 

Hunter, William 197 

Hussein, Adan Abdi 198 

Huston, Dan 218 

Huston, James 298 

Hutch, Gail 171, 209 

Hutchison, Dennis 184 

Hutchison, Karl 257 

Hutton, James 241, 298 

Hyle, Nancy 196, 237 



Imber, George 217 

Ingham, Joyce ..140, 141, 149, 
239 

Irwin, Barbara 230 

Irwin, Leo 261 

Isele, Ron 157, 275 

Ishee, Roger 265, 298 

Ismail, Ismail Ali 198 

Iswarienko, Alex 198 

J 

Jaccaud, James 148, 255 

Jackson, Floyd 263 

Jackson, Major 245 

Jackson, Sandra 298 

Jacobs, Dave 184, 191 

Jaegers, Carolyn 223 

Jaegerson, Karen 223 

Jaffe, Gilbert 177, 187 

Jakulis, Eugene 298 

Jakymice, Anna 197 

James, Jim 195 

Jandura, Elsie 298 

James, Sally 298 

Janson, Kathryn 298 

Kasinski, Nancy 183, 193 

Jaskels, Christine .... 193, 214 

Jeffries, James 250 

Jenkins, Carol 223 

Jenkins, Gayle 197 

Jenkins, George . .157, 258, 298 

Jennings, Brian 269 

Jensen, William 298 

Jerome, Myrna 298 

Jevack, Jerry 216 

Jirkans, Ravmond 161 

Johannl, Tom 241 

Johns, Jacquelun 237 

Johnson, Alan 264, 298 

Johnson, Beth 231 

Johnson, Gayle 196 

Johnson, Grayce 193 

Johnson, Ingrid 198 

Johnson, James 261 

Johnson, Joyce 298 

Johnson, Judy ..183, 208, 298 

Johnson, Laurie 182, 298 

Johnson, Kitty 298 

Johnson, Margaret . . . 192, 239 

Johnson, Paul 215 

Johnson, Sue 166, 210 

Johnston, Kitty ..158. 177, 186 

Johnston, Linda 182 

Jollitf, Robert 218, 241 

Jones, Carol 299 

Jones, Charles 263 

Jones, Charles 263 

Jones, David 259 

Jones, Gary 188, 299 

Jones, Harrison 299 



Jones, Karen ..145, 197, 206, 
299 

Jones, Margaret 231 

Jones, Marsha 196 

Jones, Polly 149, 223 

Jones, Robert ..187, 275, 255 

Joyce, Mike 146, 241 

Julian, James 241 

Jusuf, Rival 198 

K 

Kadis, Sally 299 

Kadowaki, Janet ....144, 145. 
156, 182, 183, 238, 299 

Kaduck, John 299 

Kain, Allyn 265, 299 

Kaiser, Nancy 237 

Kakis, Peter 299 

Kalb, Jerry 252 

Kaliden, Carole.. 142, 1,56, 177, 
178, 235, 299 

Kaliszew.ski, Jerry 186 

Kallenborn, Donald 273 

Kan, Yuen-Ram 198 

Karis, Pete 261 

Kase, Elaine 223, 299 

Kaserman, James ....146, 245 

Kasler, Jeff 161, 299 

Kasperavicius, Virgil 187 

Kass, Jim 299 

Katz, Lois 186 

Katz, Richard 252 

Kawai, Pauline Terry ...182, 
183, 299 

Kazmaier, Mary 182, 229 

Keefer, Pat 213 

Keelor, Pat 223, 299 

Keener, Elaine 299 

Keith, Dave 189 

Keith, Karol 170 

Kellar, Jean 182 

Keller, Keith 218 

Keller, Kent 263 

Keller, Robert 218, 219 

Keller, Sara 239 

Kelley, Michael 216 

Kelling, Gilbert 245 

Kellner, Janet 213 

Kellogg, Robert 252, 299 

Kelly, Bette 299 

Kelso, Craig 261 

Kemelhar, Ronald 299 

Kempf, Dennis 259, 299 

Kemple, Larry 261 

Kendricks, Elmira ...140, 141, 
156, 163, 299 

Kennedy, Judy 214 

Kennedy, Michael 265 

Kenney, Daniel 271 

Kermode, Joy 170 

Kerner, Sue 182 

Kerr, Jonelle 225 

Kessler, Ronald 273, 299 

Kessler, Tom 218 

Kestner, Jack 299 

Kever, Tom 174 

Keyerleber, Denny ...170, 299 

Keys, Cynthia 237, 299 

Kieber, Elizabeth 233 

Kietlanski, Barbara ..149, 182, 

213, 225 

Kikendall, Thomas ..176, 241, 

300 

Kikta, Chris 196 

Kilker, Thomas 300 

Kimball Charles 252, 300 

Kines, Linda 231 

King, Janet 300 

King, Jeffrey 240 

King, Kathleen 230, 300 

King, Ronald 300 

King, William 242 

Kinney, Edward 193, 195 

Kirby, Barbara 206 

Kirk, Dottie 208 

Kirman, Steve 168, 215 

Kirtley, Mike 189 

Kish, Barbara 300 



Kish, David 300 

Kisiel, Phyllis 182, 213 

Kissel, Carol 182, 183 

Kitrinou, Olga ..163, 193, 198, 
300 

Kittle, Charles 180 

Kitzmiller, Neva ....145, 171, 

208, 300 

Kluiniemi, Linda ...171, 213 

Klaas, Margaret 300 

Klecka, James 269 

Kleeh, John 175 

Kleihaver, Brent 173 

Kleihavcr, Scott 173 

Klein, James 300 

Kleinfeld, James 263, 300 

Klcinfcld, Terry 263 

Kliot, Jerrv 246 

Klingcr, Ralph 175, 300 

Klo.ss, Jack 252, 300 

Klouda, Kenneth 163 

Klug, Kaye 196 

Knight Deanna .182, 183, 208, 
237 

Knight, John 250, 300 

Knippenberg, Katharin ...300 

Knittcl, Paul 153, 173 

Knoblock, Keith 300 

Know, David 300 

Knowles,^Lindalee 193 

Knox, David 197 

Koba, Mary 300 

Koch, David 166, 216 

Kocour, Frank 187 

Koehler, Rita 214 

Kohler, Ruthmary ..182, 183, 
300 

Kohlof, Vikki 300 

Kohmann, Les 218 

Kohn, Michael 246, 300 

Kokko, John 301 

Kolby, Arleen 301 

Kolopajlo, Len 257 

Kolthoff. Kenneth 301 

Komyati, Barbara 210 

Korab, Thomas 245 

Korner, Allen 301 

Korpowski, Joy 167 

Kosa, Carol 168 

Kosarko, Virginia ...166, 301 

Kosey, Rosemary 182, 301 

Kosher, Carole 210 

Kostelnik, Jack 194 

Kostelnik, Phillip 245 

Koteles, Linda 301 

Kotwis, .^Kudrew 267, 301 

Kovacs, Fran 182, 301 

Koval, Kathleen 231 

Kowal.ski, Jerome 189 

Kozuh, Karen 239 

Kracker, Robert 260 

Kracker, Thomas ...262, 301 

Kraft, Michael 263 

Kramer, Joyce 196, 202 

Kramer. Marilyn 182 

Kramer. Robert 301 

Kramer, Terry 183, 193 

Kraus, Sara 159, 177, 301 

Kreiner, Kenneth ...162, 301 

Kreisher, Glen 275 

Kreitler, Marilyn 183, 196 

Kreutzer, Jeffrey 301 

Kridler, Richard 245 

Krieger, Richard 265 

Krispinsky, Carol 239 

Krispinsky, Jerome 174 

Krispinsky, Karol ....182, 149 

Krites, Vance 215 

Krivec, Ronald 255, 301 

Krotz, Jean 233 

Krupienski, Janice ...223, 149 

Kubancik, Vincent 301 

Kubicek, Ron 245 

Kucinski, Geraldine 301 

Kucharek, Arleen . . . .183, 208 

Kuchenbrod, Gerald 245 

Kucinsky, Gerry 163 

Kuhlke, Denis 245 

Kuhn, Thaya 208 



Kulczyckvj, George ..1!)7, 301 

Kiindlz, irv 169. 170, 'iOl 

Kiinsman. Sandra 208 

Kunzc, Philip 275 

Kiiratnick. Barbara. . 108. 193 

Kurihara. Atsuo 198 

Kurtz, Linda 206 

Kvet. William ..1-16. 170. .301 
Kwallek, Nancy 301 



LaCivita, Jim 218 

Ladd. Ellen 190. 231 

Uaenimle. Paul 27.') 

LaMarca. Linda 239. 30) 

Lambo. Al 196, 301 

Lamers. Herman 20.5. 301 

Lamont. William 188. 302 

Lamp, Fred 174, 189 

Lampe, Michael 269 

Landefcld, Dale 217 

Landis, George ..188. 245, 302 

Landoll, Kenneth 302 

Landor, Mary 237, 302 

Landphair, Newell 259 

Lange, Anne 302 

Langcll, Kay 302 

Lann. James 252 

Lanzi. Jean 182, .302 

Lapidcs. Michael 216, 246 

LaPolla, Diane 235, 302 

Larcomb. James 193 

Larick. Christopher 269 

Larson, Bruce 173 

Lasby. Richard 250 

Lasinis, Joseph 249 

Latta, Betty 192. 205 

Lauteschleger. Ryon 2.59 

Lavelle. Daniel 265 

Lawsen, James 174 

Law.son, Barbara 140 

Lawson, Pete 175. 265 

Lcanza. Edward 267. 302 

Lease, Robert 263. 302 

Lealh, .Sharen 302 

Leathers. Kathie 193 

Ledtord. (;rant 302 

Ledger, Stephen 203, 302 

Lee. John ..140. 141, 205, .302 

Lee, William 259 

Lecdom, Carol 170 

Leedy, Benita 195 

Lcedy. Donald 218 

Legg.' Gary 302 

Lehmiller. Mike 189 

Lehnhardt. David 177 

Lehowicz. Larry 184 

Lemoine. David 302 

I.enna. Michael 302 

Lenox. Linda 205. 225 

Lent/. Rich 169. 170 

Lequyea. Terrv 217. 302 

Lesko, Robert 207 

Leskovas, Tom 108 

Less, Mary .' 181. 229 

Letzelter, Gretchen ..239. 303 

Levant. William 249 

Levenlis. John 303 

Lcwandoski. Joseph 263 

Lewandoski, Nancy 174 

Lewis, Grayce 193 

Lewis, Janice 223 

Lewis, Joseph 303 

Lewis, Minor 277 

Lewis, Thomas 140. 303 

Libby, Barbara 145, 239 

Liberator, Andrea 205 

Lieberman, Sharon 303 

Lilic, Jack 263. .303 

Lillcy, Jean 182, 303 

Lima, David 259 

Limburg. Joan 197 

Liiiiongi. Eleanor 235 

Lincavage. Karen 183 

Lind, Mayris 182, 303 

Lin<lquist, Constance 103 

Lindscy. Dianne 171 

Linerodo. Wan<la 239 



Ling. Vih -Tang 103 

Lininger. Joanne 235 

Linvillc. Lvie 101 

Lipin.ski. Barbara 209. 303 

Lippert. Donald 245 

Liska. Paula 303 

Little, Jo 205 

Little, Lawrence 201 

Llewellyn, Tim 218 

Lloyd, Diana ,303 

Lloyd. Karen 233 

Lloyd, Robert 189 

Lloyd. William 240 

Lobel. Bob 140. 218. 271 

Lobello. Anthony 183 

Lockart. Sharon 180 

I.ochc. Martha 303 

Locotosh. Donald ...277. 303 

Lodge. Priscilla 182. 303 

Logan. Mary 182, 214 

LoUini, Luke 217. 249 

Lombard. William 105 

Lombardo, Katherinc 303 

Loomis. Bonnie 179. 180 

Lopatich. Dave 181 

LoPresti. Patricia .... 183. 208 

Lorentzcn. Paul 273 

I.osch, Marjory 303 

Losey, Rosemary 183 

Louden. S. C 191 

Loughry, Richard ...203. 303 

Louie. Wanda ..182, 183, 198. 

200, 303 

Love. Dale 303 

Love. Robert 303 

Lube. Joan 183, 190. 213 

Lucas. Gay 231. 303 

Lucas. Susan 223 

Luce. Darlcne 182 

I.iuk. Larry 303 

l.nckner, John .303 

Liidwick. Marilyn 303 

Lukes. Elizabeth 202 

Lukucli. Frank 245 

L"'len. Tarey 181 

Luoma, Ruth 303 

Lupica. Thomas 303 

Luse, James 255 

Lutes. Billy 303 

Lutkus. Carol 193, 233 

Lutz, Phyllis 303 

Lux. Cheryle 196 

l.uxinorc, Thomas 255 

Lyday. Anne 193, 226 

Lyme, Ron 273, 303 

Lyons, Dale 304 

Lynski. Tim 277 

Lyile. Carl 269. 304 

Mc 

McAllister. Joanne 170 

McArtor, Ken ...148. 257, 304 

McBey, Art 146 

MrClallum. James 189 

McClarthv. Edward 181 

McClaslin. Lela 231. 304 

McClain. Carol . . 150. 180. 226 

McClcary. Jan 237 

McClcerv. Jan... 180, 196, 304 

McClelland, Nancy 304 

McClelland, Susan 202 

McCormick. Lawrence ...304 
McCullagh. Bob.. 140, 193. 217 

McCurry. Lewis 304 

McDonald, Larry 304 

McDonald. Pat 145, 186. 

192, 210, 237 

McElroy, Judy 195 

McGarry, Jan 1.59, 177 

McGintv. Margaret 304 

McGonigal, Linda ...1.59, 177. 
237, 304 

McGowan, Kay 140, 202 

McGrath, James 250 

McGnider. Robert 304 

Mcllenrv. Mary.. 149, 231, 304 

Mclnlosli. Bruce 269 

MiKcTi/ic. Joan 188 



McKenzic. Richard .,2.59. 304 

McKinnev. Linda 174 

McLaren. Marjory 304 

McLean. David 189 

McMahon. Failh 304 

McMahon. Patrick 105 

McMahon. Robert 253 

McManamon. Mary 182 

McNamara. Bill 216 

McNeal. Earl 243 

McNcal, Errol 304 

McNeill, Allan 190, 198 

McQiiiney. Dolores 304 

McVey. Arthur 249 

M 

MacClaren, Robert 249 

MacGregor, Diane 229 

Mackenzie. Lynore 208 

Mackil. Pat . '. 205. 223 

Macko. David 250 

Madden. Ginny 171 

Madge. David 260 

Magalcnga. Pat 229 

Magill. Roger... 170. 241. .304 

Mohoulic. Patricia 304 

Mairs. Margaret 226, 304 

Majick. Jean 180, 233, 304 

Major. Frances 305 

Malatin. Martin 305 

Malco. Joanne 196 

Malinas. Sandra 305 

Malish. Terrv 269 

Mallarnce. Marlene ..158. 159. 
171. 199. .305 

Malone. James 263 

Malvnowskv. Areta 208 

Mandel. Emanuel 172 

Mandnsky. Judy 145, 205 

Mansfield, Carol 140, 235 

Manisch, Daniel 263 

Manzi. Cai4a 200 

Marccca. John 259 

Marchand. Harry 174 

Marchiore. Lvnne 183. 

196. 229 
Marino, I.ihbv . ,115, 1,56, 202 

Marino, Rosemarie 305 

Markovic, Ricliar<l 241 

Markulis. Mary 183 

Marhoff. Pearl 103. 200 

Maron. Robert 181. 198 

Marquardt. Karen 235 

Marshall. Diane 199 

Marshall. Gary 305 

Marshall. Jerrv 305 

Marshall. Margaret 208 

Martin, Daniel 275 

Martin, Elaine 174, 305 

Marl in, Jancttc 305 

Martin, John 305 

Martin, Joseph 207 

Martin, Linda, . .109. 171. .305 
Martin. Norma ..180. 183. .305 

Martin, William 259. 305 

Martin. William 305 

Martini. Maria 180. 192. 

2.37, .305 

Many. Keith 181 

Marly. Roger 265 

Martz. ^Villiam 305 

Marvin. Pete 189. 210. 219 

Marwiisch. Orrin 202 

Marx. Gcri 182 

Marx. Robert 246 

Mascara. William 187 

Maser. Lvnne 186 

Maskow. JoAnn 223. 305 

Maslyk. Thomas 188. 241 

Masquelier. Louise ...158. 174 

Massey. Linda 210. 235 

Malchev. Joseph 181 

Mather. Robert 209 

Mathes. Gail 1.59 

Mathews. Diane 23.5, 305 

Mathey, Peggy 305 

Mathis. Gail .305 

Mattias. Reltig 101 



Mattis, Tom 257 

Maurcr. Patrick 267 

Maurer, William 305 

Maxwell, Carole 226, 305 

Maxwell, Relda 305 

May, Nancy 199 

Mayer, Carol 202 

Mayerholtz, Frank 273 

Mayernick, Tom 189 

Mead. John 176, 259 

Meadows, Barbara 198 

Meal. James 209 

Means. Don 200 

Meek. Richard. . .160. 2.50, 305 

Medas, Judy 183 

Medve, Joe 250 

Megery, Joe 176, 277 

Mehl, Richard 240 

Meir, Thomas 241 

Meissner. William ...269, 305 

Melchcr, Pat 174, 191 

Melnyk. Helen 197 

Mendolin, Ronald 259 

Meneghclli. Lance 248 

Mengcs, David 205 

Merchant. Donald 261 

Mershman, Richard 305 

Mcrtz. Wade 275, 305 

Mesnick, I.awrei\ce 246 

Metcalf, Elinor 235 

Mctcalf, James 306 

Metrovick, Peter 306 

Meyer, David 265 

Meyerholtz, Frank 306 

Meyers. Bruce 215 

Mezcra. Richard 306 

Michael, Judy 144. 145. 

223. 306 

Micheals. William 259 

Michalski. Jim 218 

Michener. Karen 202 

Michl. Maryanna 193 

Mikash. Carole 193. .306 

Milanich. Edward 249 

Miller. Anita 156, 306 

Miller. Bonnie 214 

Miller. David 271 

Miller, Donna 235 

Miller, Garv 189 

Miller, Gloria 169, 171. 

182, 233 

Miller, Harriet 306 

Miller, Jack 263 

Miller, James .,.187. 261, 263 

Miller. Karen 193 

Miller. Lvnda 196 

Miller. Marybcth , 145. 235, 306 

Miller, Maxine 213 

Miller, Melodic 183. 214 

Miller. Paul 265 

Miller. .Sandra .306 

Miller. Thomas 188. 300 

Miller. Willard 215 

Miller. William . .218. 257. 203 

Mills. Kathy 193. 209, 237 

Mills. Sandra 300 

Milosevich. George 300 

Minadeo, Mary 306 

Minadio. William 271 

Miner. Barbara 306 

Minor. John 140. 263 

Minter. Carole 206 

Mintz. Phyllis 306 

Mi.sch, Margaret 182 

Miltendorf. Betty 238 

Millendorf. Jane' 182 

Mohr. Myron 255 

Mohrman. Evelyn 208 

Moir. Thoinas 306 

Molin. Margaret 306 

Moll. Eric 215 

Molnar. Barbara 205 

Molnar, Kenneth 271 

Molnar. Sue 160, 306 

Mololky. Carol 176 

Monos, Dennis 277 

Monos, Lois 306 

Monlagner. ,\da 228. 306 

Monteith. Carroll 255 

Montgomery, Joanne 239 



Montgomery, Mary 307 

Montgomery, Nancy . .143, 237 

Mook, Linda 307 

Moore, Daniel 162, 307 

Moore, Donald 148, 264 

Moore, Edwin 260 

Moore, Patty 180 

Moore, Phyllis 179, 307 

Moorehead, Bill 140, 263 

Moorman, Melvin . . . .273, 307 

Moorman, Mike 148 

Moran, Kathy 186, 229 

Moran, Marilyn 180 

Moran, Tcrrence 241 

Morford, Joyce 229, 307 

Morgan, Terri 239 

Morrall, Richard 166, 218 

Morre, Phyllis 182 

Morrell, Douglas 273, 307 

Morrell, Michael .... 162, 307 

Morrow, Becky 164, 193 

Morrow, Carolyn. 145, 158, 214 

Morrow, Gavle 239 

Morton, R. H 191 

Mo.ser, Sharon 182 

Mosher, Harriet 210 

Moshier, Dave 265 

Mostello, Leonard 259 

Mottl, Nora 182, 183, 307 

Molyka, Francis 173 

Mouahedi, Manouchehr .198 

Mowels, Mary 198 

Mowinski, Patricia 307 

Moxley, Jaines 307 

Mueller, Karen 202, 226 

Mueller, Robert 307 

Muesegaes, Mary. 140, 149, 231 

Mullett, Darlene 307 

Mundy, Nancy 307 

Munger, Jan 180, 307 

Mungcr, Phillip 259 

Munroe, William 255 

Murdock, Ginger 182 

Murdock, Sandy 182 

Murfin, James 157, 181 

Murphy, Curren 265 

Murphy, Linda 307 

Murphy, Pat 145, 156 

Murphy, Raymond 187 

Murphy, Richard 271 

Murphy, Suzanne . . . .231, 307 

Murray, Kay 307 

Murry, Hilton 242 

Musbach, Edward 241 

Musselman, Nancy 307 

Myers, Diane 307 

Myers, Pam 182 

Myers, Ralph 176, 277 



N 

Nader, Donald 307 

Nail, William 189 

Napoli, Philip 267 

Naragon, Marcalle 307 

Naturale, Richard 307 

Naymik. Kay. 168, 183, 193,214 

Neay, Nancy 198 

Nebergall, Margaret 307 

Ncff, Sally 171, 183, 307 

Ncgin, Miriam 183 

Nelson, Karen . . .143, 210, 237 

Nelson, Lee 246 

Nekson, Robert 265 

Nemec, Helen 307 

Nero, Tom 140, 215 

Nester, Bud 271 

Neuzil, Ken 189 

Newell, John 165 

Newell, Julia 308 

Nicely, Sara 308 

Niece, Don 195, 218 

Niedzialek, Raymond 259 

Nunisto, Janice 308 

Niksson, Ruth 308 

Nimlowycz, Wally. . . .259, 308 

Nimon, Larry 163 

Nimylowycz, Zenovia 197 



Noel, Millie 196 

Noonan, David 269 

Norris, Dan 217 

Norris, David 264, 308 

Nosan, Connie 229, 308 

Noss, Walter 218 

Nothaft. Carl. , . .148, 253, .308 

Novak, John 216 

Noukov, Diane 308 

Novotny, Karen 237 

Nowak, Gerald 308 

Nowdome, Patricia 233 

Nyerges, William 215 

Nylund, Tom 163, 198 

o 

Oakum, Valerie 308 

Gates, Ralph 140, 146, 2.59 

Ober, Marilu 177 

Oberdorfer, James 269 

O'Brien, Patricia 182 

O'Brien, Richard 275 

Obringer, Daniel 308 

Obst, Randall 241 

Ochendowski, Jan 166 

O'Connor, Michael 187 

Ockuly, Eileen 308 

O'Donnel, Thomas 252 

O'Donnell, John 277 

Ohitmer, Ann 183 

Oker, Michael 273, 308 

Olbrysh, Ronald 162 

Olczak, Ted 188, .308 

Olinkevych, Martha. . .197, .308 

Oliver, Lois 231, .309 

Oliver, William 253 

Ollila, Wavne ...173, 218, .309 

Olm, Clifford 175 

Olrich, Gale 215 

Olsen, Nina 195 

Oltmanns, Katie 171, 183 

Ondrasek, Michael ...186, 187 

Ondrev, Dick 180 

Orloff,' Wladimir 198 

Orr, Marilyn 229 

Orrill, Betty 196 

Orseno. Leonard 277 

Orton, Judith 309 

Osborne, Robert 177, 309 

Osborne, Sondra 223 

Osman, Yusuf 198 

Overcasher, Linda .... 183, 195 



Pahls, Tony 259 

Paige, Richard 162, 309 

Painter, Eric 175 

Palechka, Walt 148, 257 

Palek, Kenneth 187 

Palusci, Peter 245 

Pamfilio, Aurel 181, 273 

Panagopoulos, Nicholas . . .259 

Pancost, Carol 199, 309 

Paparone, Paul 218 

Paplinski, Richard 277, 309 

Pappano, Daniel 309 

Parachek, Lynn 218 

Pardee, Ralph 162, 309 

Parish, O. N 191 

Pariso, Barbara 237 

Parizman, Harvey 218 

Parker, Bill 196 

Parker, Bruce 309 

Parker, Dianne 171, 210 

Parker, Marilyn 169, 171 

Parsh, Barbara 309 

Parsons, Dennis 241 

Parsons, George 309 

Parvis, All 198 

Paryzek, Jayne 186, 309 

Pasaic, Carol 186 

Pasternak, Milton ...246, 309 

Paton, Robert .309 

Pattee, Susan 197 

Patterson, John 161, 162, 

309 



Patterson, Sharon ...149, 214, 
226 

Paul, Donald 309 

Pauline, Suzanne 163 

Paulus, Gail 235 

Pavlick, Pete 193 

Pawuk, Darecn 168, 309 

Payer, Kayleene 156, 309 

Payne, Gary 277 

Payne, Tracy 250 

Paysor, Richard 176, 309 

Pearch, Thomas 187 

Peate, Judy 234, 309 

Peck, Robin 261 

Peeler, Monroe 243, 309 

Pects, Thomas 257 

Pectz, Thomas ..188, 265, 309 

Fellow, David 309 

Pence, Lawrence ....177, 186, 
263, 309 

Pentield, Irene 309 

Penn, Eugene 309 

Penncll, Judy 309 

Pentz, Bonnie 163 

Perdue, Kathleen 161, 309 

Perkins, Antoinette 237 

Perkins, Bonnie 310 

Perkins, John 187 

Perkins, Rick 140, 164 

Perkins, Robert 310 

Perme, John 187, 273 

Perrinc, John 241 

Perrine, Nancy 238, 310 

Perry, Odessa 310 

Perry, Phyllis 186, 193 

Pcrshern, John 188 

Pcrzanowski, Janice 310 

Petel, John 263 

Peters, Joyce 170, 183 

Peterson, Dave 269 

Peterson, Denny 140, 253 

Peterson, Karen 223 

Peterson, Nancy. 182, 186, 210, 
310 

Peterson, Norman 310 

Petraitis, Cheryl 142, 149, 

237, 310 

Petrie, Carol 208 

Petrison, Vivian 193, 310 

Petro, Marion 173 

Pelroff, Peter 310 

Petrovic. Pat 145 

Petrunia, John 263 

Pettay, Judy 164, 180, 229 

Pettibonc, Roger 259 

Peura, Nancy 182, 310 

Pcvec, Hildcgarde ...195, 202 

Pticger, Penny 310 

Pfeiffer, Richard 253 

Pfender, Barbara ....182, 183 

Pfeuffer, Howard 269 

Pfingsten, James 245 

Pflegcr, Penny 226 

Ptoor, Susan 229 

Phalen, James ..218, 219, 245, 

310 

Phillips, Bill ... .148. 266, 310 

Phillips, Georgia 193 

Phillips, Harvey 195, 216 

Pichitakul, Nitasna ..165, 174, 
197, 198, 310 

Pickard, Ed 181 

Pickford, Bruce 187 

Pierce, Carolyn 231 

Pierson, William 310 

Piglia, Pascal 310 

Pihulak, Oksana 197 

Pike, Robert 259 

Pike, Sharon 183, 213 

Pilutti, John 219 

Pine, Pattie 210 

Pino, Santo 162 

Pintar, LeRoy 250 

Pirtle, William 253, 310 

Pitcher, Robert 261 

Pitten, Donna 310 

Pixley, Joann 310 

Pizer, Josephine 230, 310 

Pizzuti, Richard 271 



Place, Roger 194 

Plas, Margaret 311 

Plesnicher, Carl 311 

Pletcher, Barbara 311 

Plocica, Stanley 249 

Plucinski, Jean 214, 311 

Plues, Sandra 229 

Podojil, Eugene 311 

Polacsek, Betty 311 

Polacsek, Betty 311 

Polanski, Camille 213 

Pollock, Isaac 311 

Popa, Vicki 213 

Popio, Richard 187 

Porowski, Edward 250 

Portteus, Carrie 223 

Posgay, Harriet. .156, 180, 183, 
192, 233 

Potashnik, Chuck 216 

Poulakos, Tcria 311 

Powell, David 265 

Powell, Sara 226, 311 

Powrie, Max 265, 311 

Prathcr, Larry . . . < 187 

Prechtel, Patricia 194 

Price, Cathy 196 

Price, Eleanor 235 

Price, Niel . . .: 271 

Primm, Donna 311 

Profusek, Georgia ...145, 231 

Prokopius, Rich 217 

Ptak, Karla 183, 193, 311 

Pucci, Maria 239 

Pudloski, Frank 162, 311 

Purcell, Jackie 164, 231 

Purely, Rich 170, 217 

Purser, Edward 253 

Pusateri, Judy 196 

Q 

Quagliate, Josie 311 

Quinn, Jean 311 

Quintiliani, Gerald 175 

R 

Raasch, Karen ..173, 182, 311 

Radovic, James 241 

Ragon, Ellen ...208, 209, 233 

Rainey, Ron 175 

Rajkowski, Jeanne 311 

Rakowsky, Roman ...184. 197 
Rambacher, Elizabeth ... .31 1 

Raniella, Jacquic 235, 311 

Ramey, Dennis 248, 311 

Ramey, Kelly 140 

Ramsey, David 263 

Ramsey, Doris 199, 208 

Ram.scy, Lee 311 

Ramsey, Linda 228 

Randy, Thomas 146 

Ranen, Howard 176, 311 

Ran.som, Marilyn ...171, 233 
Raponi, Ted ...216, 219, 311 

Ratochka, Olga 197 

Rattan, Karen 226 

Rausch, James 191, 196 

Raw, Richard 311 

Rawlings, T. D 191 

Ray, David 217 

Raymond, Marianne 311 

Razem, Ruth 213 

Ready, David 311 

Reagan, Karen ..142, 156, 237, 
312 

Reams, Carolyn 312 

Rebell, Marie ..192, 214, 235 

Reddinger, Kenneth 250 

Redington, R. F 191 

Redman, Mary 312 

Reed, James ....189, 261, 312 

Reed, Lillian ..158, 196, 199, 

143, 226 

Reed, Sandra 312 

Reed, Vic 271 

Rccdick, Ronald .176, 312, 277 
Reese, Richard ,.186, 187, 198 



Reichart. John 186, 187 

Reigleman, Mary 173 

Reiling, John .' 218 

Reiman, Charles 312 

Reinbolt, James 181 

Reiter, Shirley 183 

Reikowski, Don 162. 312 

Remington, J. W 193 

Remmy, Gerald 267 

Renkenberger, Jeffery 253 

Rennie, Lawson 312 

Renninger, Dave 148, 157, 

249, 312 

Resko, Norman 250, 312 

Rettig, Matthias 312 

Rex, Harold 312 

Reynolds. Beverly ...183, 193 

Reynolds, Jan 226 

Reynolds, JoAnn ....149, 179, 

237, 312 

Reynolds, Kenneth 312 

Reynolds, Linda 312 

Reznick, Judy 174 

Rhiel, Gary 263 

Rhodes, J. M 191 

Rice, Eva 312 

Rice, Joan 145 

Richard. Margaret ..175, 312 

Richard, Taylor 175 

Richards, Judy 195 

Richards, Lois 312 

Richards. Sydney ....266, 312 

Richardson, Beverly 312 

Richardson. Diane 196 

Richeson. Donald ...269, 312 

Richmond, Sara 159 

Rickert, Nancy 193. 226 

Riddle. Nancy 183. 226 

Riebe. Dawn 170 

Riedel, Janet 159 

Rieger, James 187 

Riehl, Marjorie 173 

Rieth, Bob 189 

Rietz, John 189 

Rigby. Donna 210, 237 

Riggenbach, Betty 179 

Rigoli, John .. '. 312 

Rila. Virginia 183, 313 

Rilev, Ann 149, 229 

Riley, Michael 186, 218 

Rimbey, Charles 313 

Risler.Ed 161, 313 

Ritzert, Gary 184 

Roach, Ruth 174 

Robb, Sandra 313 

Roberson, Bob 164 

Roberts, Corinne ...140, 225. 
313 

Roberts, Laura 313 

Roberts, Nancy 140, 231 

Robertson, Beverly .183, 193. 

196, 2.39 

Robertson, Phyllis 196 

Robertson, Susan 313 

Robison. Jill 173 

Robinson. Richard 263 

Robinson. Virginia 313 

Rocca. Carol 193 

Rodda, Suzanne 225. 313 

Rodriguez. Hector 215 

Roebuck. Sharon 208 

Roehler, Rita 166 

Rogalski, Robert 313 

Rogan. Rose 313 

Rogers. Francis 313 

Rogers, William 186. 187 

Rolbuck, .Sharen 173 

Romane. Frank 193 

Romanin, Tom 143, 216 

Romano. Frank 2.50 

Romito. Elizabeth 197 

Ronshausen, Nina . .183, 223. 
313 

Roof. Patricia 239 

Roonev, Catherine 223 

Root, Ted 188, 241, 313 

Roper, Marianne 171 

Rose, C. R 191 

Rose, Donna 172 



Rose, Lawrence 246 

Rose. Melanie 186 

Rosenberger, Carol .168, 182 

Ross, Barbara 237, 313 

Ross, J. R 191 

Ross, Robert 313 

Roszkowski, Mary 199 

Rote. Patricia 237 

Roth, Arthur 259 

Roth. David 181. 313 

Rotnem, M. B 175 

Rottman. R. E 191 

Rovtar, Mary 231 

Rowe, Kenneth 165, 313 

Rozanski, Diane 235 

Rubins, Bob 143. 271 

Rucker. James 148. 264 

Rudd, Clifford 188, 313 

Rudy, Milton 218, 275 

Ruetenik. Sandy 158, 199 

Rupert, Donald 313 

Rupert, Jean ...158, 199, 313 

Russ, Nancy 313 

Russell. David 253 

Rus,sell. Norma 239 

Russo. Gale 313 

Ruszkowski. Lester ..273. 313 

Rynearson. David ...186, 187. 

261 

s 

Sabo, Mildred 313 

Sabo, Theodore 187. 241 

Sabol. Ron 175 

Sabol. Dick 166 

Sabula, Barb 196 

Sackman, Al 218 

Saddler. Thomas 257 

Sadler, John 249 

Salav, Bonnie 238, 313 

Saluk, Kwitka 197 

Salvador, Jean ..144, 145, 156. 
178, 179, 183, 314 

SaLcr, Sharon 193 

Sambrook. Donald ...184, 261 

Samstag. Carol 227 

Samuelson. Barbara 314 

Sanborn, Jo.sselyn ...192, 314 

Sanders, Sandra 171 

Sander-son, Carol 193 

Saners, Nancy 180, 192 

Santord, Harriet 314 

Santora, Joseph 217 

Saunders. Dean 257 

Savinsky, Karen 239, 314 

Savoy, Peter 177 

Saxman, Bruce 314 

Saxman, Judith 314 

Saye, Donald 249 

Sayers, John 259 

Savrc. Richard 189, 218 

Scarlett, Sandy 163, 182 

Schaefcr, Noreen ....231, 314 

Schaefer, Thomas 253 

Schaeffcr, Mark 189 

Schaeffer, Martin 187 

Schappelle, Robert 163 

.Scharf, Jean 183 

Schecter. Don 146 

Scheel, Judy 180 

Schcidler, Martha 314 

Schick, Steven 269 

Schiller, John 314 

Schindlcr, Carolyn 199 

.Schislcr, Marylee 180, 196 

Schissler, Carly 164 

Schlemmer, Robert 314 

Schmid. Margarctc. . . 159, 177. 

314 

.Schmidt, Louise 229 

Schmidt. Stephen 314 

Schneider, Kenneth 166 

Schneider, Luther 175 

Schneider, Marilyn 314 

Schneiter, Kathie 183 

Schnider. Marguita ..173, 195. 

202 
.Schoter, Thomas 255 



Schoner, Patricia 314 

Schooley, Richard ..163, 265, 

314 

Schrader, Lawrence 314 

Schreiner. Donna 237 

Schroeder, Chris 180 

Schroeder. Diane 229 

Schroeder, Jcanctte ..158, 182 

Schroeder, Joanne 171 

Schroeder, Mary 205 

Schroeder, Shcrri 314 

Schromen, Joan 315 

Schubeck. Frank 267, 315 

Schuenemann. Carolyn . . .235, 

315 

Schuller, Carol 183, 233 

Schultz, Donna 315 

Schumacher, Elizabeth 315 

Schuster, Barbara 315 

Schwarz, Adolf 315 

Schwartz, Michael 217 

Schweyer, Patricia 315 

Schwolow, Hermine 315 

Sciangula, Rosalie ...223, 315 

Scotchie, James 259 

Scott, Neil 315 

Scott, Stuart 177 

Scoville. Ted 249 

Scredon, Richard 315 

Seaman, Dorothy 199 

Seanton, Nancy 149 

Searcy, William 273 

Seasev, Richard 187 

Secrest, Sheryl 237 

Seemann. David 315 

Segura, Anthony 249 

Seidner, Donald 315 

Seifert, Dennis 252 

Seifried, Phyllis 202, 231 

Sek-Man, Young 198 

Selzer, Nancy 315 

Selong, Richard 271 

Semanik, Tom 166 

Semon, Gerald 263 

Sems, Edward 173 

Senft, Kenneth 315 

Sense. Ronald 315 

Ser, Dorothy 229, 315 

Sergi. John 315 

Serknis, Anne 196 

Seufer. Judith 192, 213 

Shaffer, Larry 265 

Shaffer, Lucy 159, 177 

Shalaty, John 148, 250 

Shankleton, D. M 191 

Shapiro. Scott 277 

Shapiro. Timothy 265 

.Sharif, Nadwa 198, 315 

Sharp, Neil 249, 315 

Sharp, Priscilla 182, 195 

Shaw, Amy 173, 183 

Shaw, Bruce 271 

Shaw. Harold ...174, 198, 315 

Shearer, Linda 149, 239 

Sheilder. Barbara 205 

Shelby, Helen ...182, 183. 208 

Sheller, Carol 206 

Shelley, James 315 

Shelly, James 177, 255 

Sheplin, Joan ...192, 231, 315 

Sheppard, Donna 315 

Sherry, Joseph 249 

Sherwood, Jack 217 

Shie, Duane 163, 183 

Shiftlett, Ann 315 

.Shimandle, Bonnie ...182, 208 

Shirey, Sally 315 

Shirk, Guy 195 

Shively, Diane 196 

Shissler, Carvl 182, 223 

Shively, Pat 170 

Shoemaker, Richard 315 

Shore, Patti 206 

Showers, Judy 180, 192 

Shulman, Irwin . .157, 246, 315 

Shunders, Barbara 193 

Shupe, James 253 

Shuster, Joseph 181 

Siane, Donald 174 



Sibbald, Merrillie 174 

Sichau, Arthur 181, 316 

Sidaway, Laverne 316 

Sila, Mary 316 

Sidaway, Theodore 269 

Sigler, Janet 171 

Sikorski. Dianne 239 

Sila, Mary 156, 228, 316 

Silvert, Robert 218 

Silverthorn. Nova 181 

Silvidi, Al 252 

Simcox, Phil 189, 193 

Simmons, Barbara 202, 316 

Simmons, Mary 239 

Simmons. Sally 234, 316 

Simon, Steve 216 

Simpson, Molly 316 

Singer, Barbara 316 

Sisunik, Bill 189 

Sites, Patricia 239, 316 

Sitler. Jean 145, 193, 214 

Slagel, Kathy ....140, 230, 316 

Slanker, Dorothea 316 

Sleeper, Ronald 244 

Slivka, Marie 160 

Smart, Betty 196 

Smart. Donald 267 

Smerick, Monica 316 

Smith, Bonnie 239, 149 

Smith, Charlene 145 

Smith, Erma 316 

Smith, James 187 

Smith, Jean 316 

Smith, Karen 164, 180 

Smith, Mark ....164, 258, 316 

Smith, Pat 205 

Smith, Rebecca 181 

Smith. Robert 316 

Smith. Roberta 206 

Smith, Sue 238. 316 

Smith. Thomas 269 

Smythe. Harry 173 

Snayd, Joseph 265 

Snively, Nancy 231 

Snyder, Barbara 161, 183 

Snyder, Julie 227 

Soj'ka, Yaro 216 

Soltis. Charles 266 

Sonnichsen, Ed 218 

Soos, Jim 165 

Sooy, Janet 238, 316 

Sopka, Elaine 316 

Sopko, Russell 273, 316 

Sopyla. Francis 316 

Sospirato, Francine 316 

Spangenberger. Barbara ...231 

Spelman. Jeanette 174 

Spencer, Jean 194. 316 

Sper. Barbara 233 

.Sperrv. Janice ...196, 208. 229 

Spethakis. Mary 317 

Spicer. Sheila .' 193 

.Spidle. John 317 

Spier. Carl 261 

Spisak. Eileen 186 

Spotts. John 2.57, 317 

Spring. Judv 205 

Springer. Joyce 317 

Springer. Karen 182. 196 

Square, Karen ...159. 177, 2.30 

Staats. Kenneth 317 

Stacho. Robert 189 

Stainbrook, Patricia. .. 174, 317 

•Stanley, Ronald 317 

Stanton, Nancy 229 

Stamm, Barbara 192. 202 

Stanley, Ronald 177 

Starbuck. Judy 160, 206 

Starin, Marilyn 214 

Stark. Frank 195 

Stark. Joe 140, 141 

Starner, Lowell 245 

Starr, Celia 317 

Stavot. John 317 

Stcbbins, Kathie 199 

Steciak, Luba 197, 317 

Steel, Heidi 196 

Stefansic, Judith 317 



Stehler, Leann 197 

Steigcrwald, Carole 317 

Steigerwald, Ed 218 

Stein, Karen 142, 145, 

163, 193, 317 

Stein, Michael 157 

Steiner. William 241 

Steitz. Sandra 199 

Stephan, Jim 218 

Stephen. Nancy 237 

Stephens, Craig 140 

Stephens, Jav 196, 317 

Stephens, judi 193 

Stephens, Mary 182 

Sterling, Suzanne 171 

Stern, Leonard 246 

Stesiak, Ronald.. 166, 2.50, 317 

Stewart, Donald 265, 317 

Stewart, Elaine 317 

Stewart, Judy 214 

Stewart, Mary 183 

St. George, Jennifer 196 

Stillson, Dave 253, 317 

Still.son, Richard 253 

Stine, Cindy 169, 171 

Stinson, Allan 157, 260, 

186, 317 

St. John, Alice 317 

Stock, Robert 317 

Stockhaus, Louise 173, 182 

Stokovic, Helen 317 

Stoler, .Arthur 246 

Stone, Karen 208, 227 

Stone, Paul 255 

Stonebraker, Suzie ...171, 233 

Storm, Mona 229 

Straight, Vicki 197 

Strausser, Lois 183 

Streppa, John . . .189, 216, 263 

Stribrny, Kathv 180, 317 

Strickland, Walt 218 

Stroh, Dean 216 

Stroh, Robin 184 

Strom, William 317 

Strommer, Mathias ..188, 317 
Stubbs, Harold.. 157, 242, 318 

Studer, Walter 318 

Stulak, John 267 

Sturgeon, Frank 181 

Sturm, Carl 173, 183 

Sturznickel, James 259 

Suchan, Robert 184 

Suchan, Thomas 318 

Suchy, George 184 

Suder, Richard 186, 318 

Sullivan, Donald 318 

Suomela, Richard 318 

Supinski, Charles 218 

Surface, Marilyn 318 

Sutter, John .' 257 

Suty, Virginia 235 

Swanson , Edward 252 

Swanson, Ned 143 

Swanson, Terri 193 

Swartz, Ronald. . .148, 259, 318 

Swasey, Susan 196 

Sweeney, John 184, 244 

Swinehart, Linda 196, 210 

Swinehart, Robert 263 

Swinford, Thomas 318 

Swyrydenko, Ludmilla. 168, 182 

Swyrydenko, Walter 197 

Sykora, Dennis 176, 318 

Szalkowski, Edward 267 

Szanyi, Char 193 

Szenborn, Teddy 218 

Szwast, John 216, 318 



Taddeo, Diane 223 

Taggart, Marilyn 196 

Taipale, Robert 318 

Takacs, Garry 189, 261 

Takis, Sandi 196 

Talbott, Marty 227 

Talbott, Nancy 225 

Tangtrongchitr, Amnuay ..318 



Tanski, Thomas 269 

Tarantino, Kenneth 250 

Tareznyn, Zenovia 197 

Tarulli, Dick 218 

Tate, Alfred 242 

Taylor, Cynthia 318 

Taylor, Eloise 19.3 

Taylor, James 265 

Taylor, Kent 241 

Taylor. Patty 180 

Taylor, Robert 191, 241 

Techera, Titus 261 

Telemachos, Angelique .198. 
318 
Telemachos, .-Antigone ...198 
Telemachos. Nick . . . .269. 318 
Telerico. Louis.. 189, 216, 265 

Terry, Herbert 195 

Tester, Marilyn 171 

Thayer, Bonnie 186 

Thiel, Sandy 174 

Thiry, Helen 205 

Thoma. Jan 265 

Thoman, Ron 193 

Thomas, Benjamin 175 

Thomas, James 163 

Thomas, Jan 149 

Thomas, Janet 233 

Thomas. Jeff 318 

Thomas, Larry 170 

Thomas. Nancy 171,180 

Thomas, Randy 249 

Thomas, Robert. 197. 241. 265 
Thomas, Sharlene. 171, 183,318 

Thomas, Nancy 318 

Thomes, Joan 171 

Thompson, Eric 163 

Thompson, James 318 

Thompson, Jerry 318 

Thornberry, Gary 1 65 

Thorne. Virgene 196 

Thrasher, Laurence 265 

Throckmorton, Caroline. .. 163 

Thurmon, Thomas 319 

Timms, Arthur 319 

Tice, Joyce 193 

Tihansky, Dorothy 199 

Timko, Eric 271 

Timlin, Sara 199 

Tippett, Sharon 223. 219 

Tito, Patricia 205, 319 

Tittle, Mary 319 

Tkocz, Heide 183 

Tober, Carolyn 227 

Todd, Ellen 319 

Todd, Jackie 193 

Todor, Janice 233 

Todt, David 265 

Tome, Barbara 168, 182. 

213, 237 

Tomlinson, Linda 233 

Tomplins, Linda 233 

Tonner, Robert 318 

Toohig, Karen 319 

Topalian, Violet 183 

Toperzer, Jeffry 241 

Topie, Dorothy 180, 205 

Topp, Arnold 246 

Tosha, Margaret 319 

Toth, Donald 319 

Town, Nancy 145, 205 

Toxar, Rosemary 231 

Traczynski, Rosetta ..229, 319 

Traina, Michael 319 

Trbovich, Rose . .162, 239, 319 

Trbovich, William 319 

Trende, Pat 208 

Tretinik, Marianne ..192, 210 

Trifelos, Dan 319 

Trobovitch, Rose 161 

Trotter, Lee 187 

Troutman, Phil 216 

Troxell, Nola....l63, 173, 202 

Trustz, Wanda 170 

Tsaloff, Karen 231 

Tuckerman, Murray 198 

Tuckerman, Tom 166 

Turk, Bob 172, 246 

Turkal, Joseph 319 



Turko, Michael 319 

Turlington, Brenda. . . 184, 235 

Turner, Paul 195 

Turoly, Richard 319 

Turpack, Beverly 193 

Tuskes, Kenneth 181 

Tuttle, Mabel 319 

u 

Uhall, Stephen 319 

Uhrin, Marianne 214 

Unger, Merrily 229 

Union, Norman 246 

LInroe, Jerry 319 

Urban, Terry 263 

Urso, Maria 140 

Uthe, Richard 183, 191 



Vafiadcs, Christine 319 

Vaicaitis. Christine. .. 183, 193 

Valentine. Karen 182 

Valentine, Robert 241 

Valigora, Jean 202, 319 

Valince. Barbara 231 

Van, John 319 

Van Almcn. Jane 237, 319 

Vandcrpool, Bobby K 187 

Vaneff, Anka 163, 319 

Van Epps, Judith 235 

Van Ettcn. Jean 227 

Van Horn. Sfarv Jane 173 

Vanik. Robert 241 

Vansickle, Karen 170 

Vargo, lames 146. 157, 

188, 240, 320 

Varney, Cheryl 320 

Varney, Joan 235 

Vasko.' Bruce 320 

Vassallo, Thomas 271 

Vassos. Mary .'Ann 196 

Vataha. James 320 

Vecchio. Shcrvl 183 

Venezia. Ronald 244, 320 

Vermillion, Carol 320 

Vermillion, Larry 269 

Velse, Carole 223 

Vilem, Richard 253, .320 

Vinciquerra, Richard. .188, 320 

Vine, James 320 

Vlasak. Walter 184, 188. 

277, 320 

Vlaszk, Richard 176 

Vodarska, Ronald 196 

Vogel, William 320 

Voik. Judith 320 

Volk, Roily 241 

Von Guten. William 245 

Voorhees. Robert. 188, 253, 320 

Vrana, Emil 320 

Vura, Hope 223 

w 

Wack, Eileen 193 

Wagler, Mark 193 

Wagner, Albert 169, 170 

Wagner, Barbara ....229, 320 

Wagner, Pat 196 

Wagner, Sigrid 163. 320 

Wahl, Marilyn 186, 187 

Wakefield, June 237 

Wakelee, William 263 

Walansky, Mary Ann 168 

Walchko, Jack C I("i8 

Waldraum, Harry 320 

Waldron, Charles 265 

Walker, Bruce 263, 321 

Walker, Jim. 140, 165, 189, 216 

Walker, Mary 321 

Wallace, Andrew 241 

Wallace, Jesse 195 

Wallace, Maxine 320 

Walsh, James 215 

Walsh, Susan 239 



Walter, Barbara Ann 320 

Walter, Carl 181 

Mr alter, Gerald 321 

Walter, J. David 321 

Walter, Kermit 321 

Walters, James 265 

Walters, Marsha 149, 156, 

159, 183, 233, 321 

Walworth, William 245 

Wandas, Margret 321 

Wanless. James 321 

Wannemacher, Nancy ....233 

Ward. William 321 

Warfield, Clarence ...243, 321 
Warman, Barbara . . . .183, 321 

Warner, Frances 227. 321 

Warner. Gary 267 

Warren, Jack 165, 218 

Warren, Kathryn 321 

Wasserman, M 191 

Wa.sson. Patricia 231, 321 

Watts. Marilyn 229 

Watts, Tom ■ 196 

Waugh. Lynn 239 

Weatherlv. Gayle 183 

Weaver, Don 1 89 

Weaver, Ceorge 321 

Weaver, James 162, 163, 

218, 321 

Weber, Steve 261 

Web.ster, Laurel. .1.56, 178, 321 

Webster. Laurel 237 

Weeks, Theron 262 

Wegman, Kathleen 196 

We'idner, Ellen 321 

Weil, Steve 172 

Weimert. Roy 267 

Weinhardt. Sandra 321 

Weir, Gamble 321 

Weir, Judy 158, 197 

Weirick, Marlene 186, 2.39 

Weiss, Donna 321 

Wells, Joan 321 

Welsh, Ken 140, 141 

Welsh, Ronald 259 

Welsh, Richard 321 

Welton, John 188, 321 

Weltzeimer, Margaret 321 

Wendell, William 321 

Wenner, Donald 321 

Wenning. Todd 180, 322 

Wensel, Harvey 186, 322 

Wenzlick. Marilyn 183 

Werner. Donna 229 

Wertheim, John 264 

West, Judy 196, 214 

West, Sandra 235 

Westfall, Loy 170 

Westling, Tom 215 

Wheeler, Thomas 322 

Wheller, Linda 231, 322 

Whisman, Juanita 171 

Whitaker, David 187 

White, James 193, 271, 

277, 322 

White, Lucille 322 

White, June 164, 214 

Whitledge, James 321 

Whitman, jav 216, 322 

Whitney, Fred 265 

Wicks, Joan 322 

Widenor, Joyce 180, 239 

Widlicka, Judi 223 

Weidlund, Richard 322 

Wiggins, Harold 322 

Wiibert, Holly 149, 2.35 

Wilbur, Thomas 2,57 

Wilcox, Laurel 178, 179, 

180, 156, 322 

Wilder, J. B 191 

Wilford, Tom 175 

Wilhelm, Gary 177 

Wilker, Janice 322 

Wilkes, Alberta 160 

Wilkin, Dan 175 

Wilkins, Tom 148 

Wilkinson, John 322 

Willey, David 174, 245 

Williams, Betsy 197 



Williams, Carolanne 322 

Williams. Don 21 S 

Williams. James 197 

■Williams, Lowell 242 

■Williams. Rebecca 202 

Williams. Rhonda ...171. 196 

Williams, Roger .322 

Williams. Ronald ...186. .322 

Williams, Theresa 180. 

206. 192 

Willis, Marilvn 197 

Willison, Karen 174, 183 

Wilson, Delia 322 

Wilson, Grace 233, 149 

Wilson, Janet 193, 196 

Wilson, Lois 163, 322 

Wilson, Neil 2.^.^ 

Wilson, Xvra 322 

■Wilson, Robert 25.5 

Wilson, Rov 255 

Wilson, Sallv 210 

Wilson, William 322 

Wilt, Melvin 322 

Winther, Fred 323 

Wirth, Richard 323 

Wiseman, Richard ...162. 323 
■Wisniewski. Juanita. . .231. 323 

Witherow. Frank 218. 323 

Woidtke, Paul 173, 189 

Wolanskv, Marv .Ann 168 

Wolcott, V'ange ISO, 323 

Wolf Richard 245, 323 

Wolf, Wavnc R 187 

Wolf, Claire 233, 323 



Wollam, Betty Jo.... 140, 143, 
227, 186 

Wong, Norman 198 

Wood, Bill 218 

Wood. Carol 192, 229 

Wood, J. L 191 

Woodcock, Donald ..157. 253. 
323 

Woodrow, Nancy 229 

Woodruff, Richard.. .217. 323 

Woods. Bob 189 

Woods. Sarah 323 

^Voods, Thomas 323 

Woodside, .Arch 277 

■Woodward, Tuck 271 

Wordsworth, ■Melody. .143, 235 
Worthing. Dick ......189, 191 

Wright, Jack 245 

VVyatt, Ruby 323 

Wydareny, Edward 323 

Wvman, Virginia 227 

Wynn, Holly 237 

Wyrsta, Romana 197 



Yatc, Paul 323 

Yanchar, Bonnie 210, 229 

Yang, Shing-Lang.162, 198, 323 

Yates. Paul 250 

Ycagcr. Carlcen 223. 323 

Ycamans. Sandra Kav 198 

Ycntch. N'ancv 140, 227. 323 



Yethers, Linda 193 

Yochira, John 245 

Yocum, Marv 235, 145, 210 

Yoder, Sharon 183, 229, 

193, 196 

Yoder, Marv 323 

Yoke. Steve 193 

York. Bob "215, 323 

Yosowitz. Ruth 323 

Young. Carole 210, 227 

Young, Robert 193, 253 

Youngblood, .Arthcr 245 

Yourga, Marlene. .140, 210, 235 

Yuasr, Raymond 323 

Yuill, Pat 180 

Yukich, Marie 186, 227 

Yunaska, Carol 171 

Yund, Lois 158, 323 

Yurchison, Jim 255 

Yurtin, Dolores 323 

Yurtin, Carol 173 

Yurtin, Dee 213, 229 

Yurtinus, J. F 191 

Yutzey, Loni 182, 231 

Yutzev, Yolanda 323 



7ac. David 258 

Zaczck, Janet 183, 177, 324 

Zadoroznv, ■Vivian 324 

Zagata, Ronald 324 

Zagray, Lois 324 



Zagrav, Paul 324 

Zak, David 324 

Zaietel, Bob 157, 216. 324 

Zamberlan, Karen 202 

Zamecnik, Barbara ..158, 199, 
324 

Zanecnile, Barbara 199 

Zanella, Joan 196 

Zelina, Allan 181 

Zell, Frank 218 

Zeman, Frances 158 

Zenczak, Taras 176, 324 

Zerchar, Thomas 265 

Zickcl, Sam 148, 265 

Ziegler. .Anne 324 

Ziegler, Joyce 239 

Ziegler, Judith 239 

Zielinski, Suzanne 324 

Zier, Lawrence 248, 324 

Zilka, Frances 231, 324 

Zimmer, Elaine 227 

Zimmerman, Twila 161 

Zinner, Spencer 263 

Zinz, Dennis 175, 217 

Zitz, Kenneth 324 

Zorzi, Jacqhelynn 324 

Zub, Bernadine 196 

Zuber. Joanne 324 

Zufall, Kave 324 

Zummer. Elaine 234 

Zupan, Francis 263 

Zurn, Ruth 324 

Zygmunt, Joyce 196 



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